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Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: A - B  

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, its faculty and alumni.
Last Updated: Aug 28, 2013 URL: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCOHWethingtonAB Print Guide Email Alerts

UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: A - Albright Print Page
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Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Proejct: A - Albright.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

00OH79 A/F 608

MAUREEN STRIDER ABEL

Date:  July 3, 1997

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Sharon Childs

Length: 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Fair to Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: Permission of Sharon Childs Required

 

97OH82 A/F 587

MARY A. ADAMS 

Date:  October 10, 1997

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Lauretta Byars and Helen Swain

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Poor to Fair 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

Mary A. Adams was among the first graduate students to integrate the University of Kentucky.  A graduate of Kentucky State University, Adams’ father encouraged her to enter UK to earn her master’s degree in secondary education.  Adams states that her father highly valued the education of his children.  Her mother was a former teacher.

In September of 1949, Adams began her studies at UK.  She recalls that some members of her family attempted to discourage her from attending for fear that she would be harassed, but Adams states she did not have a bad experience.  Of course, her experience was different than most white students.  In one class taught by future UK President Frank Dickey, she was asked to sit in an area separate from the white students.  She was also ignored by many students, and one professor.

Adams graduated in 1950, and states that she was graded fairly and that she was determined to show the people at UK that she could do just as well as anyone else.  Adams taught high school in Cynthiana, Kentucky for five years and then came back to UK to change her certification to elementary education.  She subsequently taught in Lexington area schools for 35 years.  She remembers her best experience at UK was walking across the stage to receive her degree and actually having white people clap for her.  She discusses her views of integrated schools, the need for more black teachers, and her expectations for African American students. 

   

95OH201 A/F 533

NORMA BOSTER ADAMS 

Date:  September 19, 1995

Location: Somerset, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

Norma Boster Adams was born in Providence in Webster County, Kentucky.  She attended Western State Teachers College between 1948 and 1950 and then enrolled in the University of Kentucky Law School.  Adams states that she had no burning desire to practice law, but that she liked what she had heard about legal education.  She explains her decision to go into a non-traditional field for women and states that she does not remember any barriers or roadblocks to her admission to law school. She recalls law school orientation and the affect of the Korean War on her class sizes.  Adams states that there were a total of four female law students when she started law school, many of whom became successful lawyers.

Adams describes her classes, and explains that she was invited to become the first female student to work on the Kentucky Law Journal.  She mentions some influential law professors like Paul Oberst who she feels helped to broaden the thinking of law students.  She mentions that she did not particularly like Roy Moreland who was unkind to the female students.  She discusses the culture of the law school and social activities.

Adams recalls that when she was getting close to graduation she was encouraged to look for jobs other than those which would require her to practice law.  She had married during her third year of law school, and since her husband was in the air force, she moved to Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio after graduation.  Adams and her husband moved later to Somerset, Kentucky where he began a law practice, and she took a job as a bookkeeper for the county schools.  The Adams’ started their family in Somerset, eventually having four children.  She began her law career by helping farmers file their tax returns.  She describes the difficulty of being a mother and having a career. 

Adams’ first court room work consisted of filing motions.  She describes how some judges treated her differently.  Within a short period of time she became president of the local bar association, and she became involved in the state bar association.  She served on the ethics committee of the state bar association in the mid-1970s.  Adams describes the camaraderie among some female lawyers in Kentucky, and she mentions problems within the legal profession in the mid-1990s.  Adams ran for the Kentucky Supreme Court in the 1980s but did not win.  She describes the campaign and her other involvements with the Republican Party in Kentucky.  Adams also became involved in education reform in Kentucky and discusses her participation in Leadership Kentucky.

 

87OH106 A/F 307

MICHAEL ADELSTEIN

Date:  July 1, 1987

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Doris Weathers

Length:  35 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Fair 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

Michael Adelstein was an English professor at the University of Kentucky and was involved with the first minority student recruitment program on campus.  Starting in 1971, Adelstein ran summer programs for two years to both encourage minority students to attend college and recruit more minority students to UK.  African Americans were particularly targeted through this program.  He discusses sending letters to faculty members throughout the university to gain support for the minority program. 

These summer programs allowed high school students to attend summer classes on the UK campus.  The classes were taught by faculty members and later graduate students from the English, foreign languages, and math departments.  Among successful attendees was George White, who later received his PhD from the University of Kentucky.

Adelstein explains that the program was an attempt to break down barriers that prevented African American students from attending UK.  One of these barriers was UK’s sullied reputation within the black community.  Adelstein states that Dr. Otis Singletary, former president of the University of Kentucky, was an important part of changing this image of the university by appointing minorities and becoming involved in African American issues.

 

85OH40 A/F 199

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  February 20, 1985

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Grace Zilverberg

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. (Arnold Dewald) Albright, former University of Kentucky administrator, discusses the creation of the Center of Developmental Change (CDC) on the University of Kentucky campus.  He states that the first discussions about the center arose before the appointment of Dr. John Oswald as UK President in 1963.  Albright explains, though, that Oswald brought an energetic movement toward the revitalization of UK of which the CDC was a part.

Albright discusses the changes made to the university during Oswald’s administration.  There was much controversy over the criteria for appointments, promotions, and awards.  The establishment of the CDC became part of a recognized need for UK to expand beyond its borders.  Albright states that the CDC was the first department to work in any organized fashion to increase the diversity of the university.  He describes Dr. Edward W. Weidner, who eventually became the first director of the CDC, although his term was short-lived.  Albright explains how the CDC increased diversity by bringing Indonesian students to UK and providing Peace Corps training for UK students.  He describes Howard Beers’ role in the CDC and discusses Beers’ relationship with the Indonesian government.  Beers eventually became the director of the CDC, and Albright feels that Beers was instrumental in keeping the CDC alive.  

Albright took a sabbatical leave during the 1969-1970 school year and traveled to Belgium.  Afterwards he did not have any close contact with the CDC, but he states that he wished the CDC could have been more a part of the university fabric.  He describes funding for programs like the CDC, mentioning USAID and the Rockefeller Foundation.  He also discusses the need for UK to put together a plan and a vision for the future.

 

88OH122 A/F 325

A.D. ALBRIGHT 

Date:  August 30, 1988 

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright was born in Washington, D.C. in 1913.  His mother died when he was two years old and he was raised by an aunt and uncle in Indiana.  He describes living for a year with them in Saskatchewan, Canada.  He explains that his aunt and uncle were strong supporters of education.

Albright secured a scholarship to DePauw University in Indiana, but after a year his savings had been depleted so severely that he had to drop out of school.  He went to work for the Bureau of Planned Industry until he was able to secure a scholarship to Milligan College in Tennessee where he met his future wife.  After graduation, he received a fellowship to the University of Tennessee to pursue a master’s degree in business.  The fellowship was through the Bureau of Industrial Research, and Albright completed some research on renting and leasing.  Albright discusses the financial hardships he endured while working his way through school. 

After completing his master’s degree, Albright secured a position as a supervisor for the Chattanooga schools.  He explains that through his work there he was able to get a position with the State of Tennessee.  Albright then received a Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship to pursue his PhD at New York University.  He mentions taking his qualifying exams and writing his dissertation.  After finishing his degree, Albright became part of the Southeastern States Cooperative Program in education administration where he participated in a study of the education of African Americans.  Their completed study, The Negro in the School, was released three days prior to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas decision.  Albright discusses his involvement in integration and his personal feelings toward integration.

 

88OH147 A/F 326

A.D. ALBRIGHT 

Date:  September 26, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this second interview, A.D. Albright describes the role of politicians in higher education in Kentucky, especially at the University of Kentucky.  He compares the roles of former governors A.B. “Happy” Chandler and Bert T. Combs in the development of the community college system in Kentucky.  Albright also describes his close relationship with Combs and his associations with other Kentucky governors.  Albright discusses former governor Louie B. Nunn’s bluntness when it came to educational funding.

Albright also describes John Oswald’s role as the president of the University of Kentucky.  He discusses the Spindletop Research Institute and Edward Lichtenhaus.  He mentions Chandler’s insistence on having the UK Medical Center named for him and how Chandler got an honorary position on the board of trustees at the University of Kentucky.

 

88OH148 A/F 327

A.D. ALBRIGHT 

Date:  September 6, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright describes how he first came to the University of Kentucky.  He states that his job at UK as director of the Bureau of School Services grew out of his work on the Kellogg project on the South.  A Kellogg leadership project and teaching experiment were both located at UK.  Albright states that he was interested in having an impact on how people view education and go about the educational process.  Albright discusses problems with education in Kentucky, especially the rising tuition rates for higher education in Kentucky.  He also mentions his relationship with Republican politician Larry Forgy, and he talks about educational reform and the need for constitutional reform in Kentucky.

 

88OH149 A/F 328

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  September 13, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses his early career at UK.  He describes some influential members of the administration with whom he had contact.  He mentions Herman Lee Donovan who was president of the University of Kentucky when Albright arrived on campus.  Albright recalls meeting Martin M. White, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, and states that he had a great affection for him.  Albright states that he quickly became acquainted with people in different disciplines because of his position as director of the Bureau of School Services and because of the efforts to infuse professional education into different disciplines.

Albright describes how President Donovan held the line against political involvement in the university, and states that he was not a great academic leader but more of an administrator.  Albright remembers Ezra Gillis and recounts a story that involved Gillis seeing students stealing band instruments without realizing what was happening at the time.   Albright also describes Leo Chamberlain, vice president of the University, Frank Peterson from the College of Business, and Frank Dickey, the dean of the College of Education.

Albright discusses his contact with the University School which was operated by the College of Education.  He recalls that there was never an African American child in the university school, and even though it was supposed to be a lab for progressive technique, it had become simply a school for children of the faculty.  Albright talks about the closing of this school.

Albright describes the search for a new university president after the retirement of Donovan and the selection of Frank Dickey, former dean of the College of Education.  He mentions Lyman Ginger, who replaced Dickey as dean of the College of Education,  and his own appointment to the position of dean of the College of Adult and Extension Education in 1957.  In this position he would have some control over the development of the state community colleges. 

   

88OH150 A/F 329

A.D. ALBRIGHT  

Date:  September 20, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

Albright discusses the role the he played in the development of the community college system and the impact that it had on the University of Kentucky.  He recalls the reaction of some faculty members that the creation of the community college system was a “watering down” of instruction.  Albright explains that he advocated community colleges remaining a part of the university system for some time, but he thinks that this now must be reexamined.   He remembers problems establishing the community colleges including finding the money for facilities, and states that the instruction in the colleges did not satisfy him in the beginning.  Albright foresaw a future transitional period where the normal college age group would be expanded.

Albright also explains his philosophy towards liberal arts education. He believes that students must have a good liberal arts education to have a good technical education.  He discusses the elitism of the liberal arts education and the influence of family in getting people to go to college.  He then describes problems with local school systems in Kentucky.  

 

88OH212 A/F 330

A.D. ALBRIGHT 

Date:  October 25, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses his career development during the late 1950s and early 1960s.  He describes changes at the College of Education in the late 1950s, and the strengths and weaknesses of various programs at the University of Kentucky including the sciences and mathematics.  Albright was appointed provost of the university during this time, and he discusses some of the challenges he faced which included resentment from other members of the faculty.  He states that the language arts, including English and the foreign languages, needed more support.  Albright remembers the vast majority of the student body was from central Kentucky at this time, and he talks about curriculum changes. 

Albright was then appointed to the position of executive vice president of the university where he dealt with the problems resulting from the advent of the computer, enrollment increases, and the lack of facilities on campus to deal with the increase in enrollment.  Albright discusses Frank Dickey’s resignation as president of the university and Dickey’s feelings that he was not treated fairly.

 

88OH213 A/F 331

A.D. ALBRIGHT  

Date:  November 8, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses attempts to shed UK’s reputation as an institute of higher learning for only central Kentucky.  He also describes the search for a new university president in 1963, and talks about the need to get some “new blood” into the institution.  Although an important administrative official at UK, Albright states that he never felt a compulsion to be the president of the University of Kentucky.  Albright describes the poor reputation that post secondary education had in the South and UK’s attempts to overcome this reputation.  He discusses the UK Board of Trustees and the relationship between the faculty and the board.  Albright also talks about the Frank Peterson controversy which involved politicians and a missing $20,000.  He mentions rising tuition and fees and the need for further state support.

 

88OH214 A/F 332

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  November 15, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright describes John Oswald’s administration as president of the University of Kentucky.  Oswald came from the University of California and Albright recalls how much Oswald wanted to change little things, like his office.  He describes how Oswald wanted the minimum amount of information in order to make a decision, and he remembers that he never really discussed his job responsibilities with Oswald.  Albright states that Oswald had many enemies and that he was criticized for wanting to do things the way that they were done in California.  Albright recalls instances when Oswald supported him, particularly one incident involving the medical center’s budget.  He discusses Oswald’s philosophy and states that Oswald saw athletics in a supporting role and considered teaching, research, and public service as the mission of the university.  Oswald was also very supportive of the community college system, and did many things to bolster research and graduate education at UK, according to Albright.

 

88OH215 A/F 333

A.D. ALBRIGHT 

Date:  November 22, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses university presidential searches and elaborates on the conflicts between the University of Kentucky and Kentucky regional universities in the 1960s.  Albright discusses developing a manual for a presidential search at Northern Kentucky University.  He describes construction projects during John Oswald’s administration as president at the University of Kentucky.  He talks about his friendship with Dr. Charles T. Wethington, Jr.  Albright discusses conflicts between Oswald and the presidents of Eastern Kentucky University and Morehead State University.  He also describes Oswald’s view of the regional higher learning institutions in Kentucky as they changed from regional colleges to regional universities.

 

88OH246 A/F 338

A.D. ALBRIGHT  

Date:  November 29, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:   Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good  

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses the development of the community colleges in Kentucky.  He describes IBM’s influence on the creation of the Lexington Technical Institute, and he talks about the implementation of selective admission at the University of Kentucky.  He discusses the movement for a community college in Louisville and the relationship between the University of Kentucky, the University of Louisville, and the city of Louisville.  Albright also describes the ties between the community colleges and the UK main campus. 

 

88OH247 A/F 339

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  December 6, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright continues his discussion of the community colleges in this interview.  He describes the faculty of the community colleges and the recruitment of higher caliber faculty over the years.  He mentions people who had an impact on the community colleges including Maurice Stanley and Charles T. Wethington, Jr.  Albright describes the relationship between University of Kentucky President John Oswald and College of Education Dean Lyman Ginger.  He explains the circumstances behind the closing of the University School and Oswald’s emphasis on a liberal arts education.  Albright discusses Oswald’s reviews of the university deans and the problems caused when Dr. Thomas D. Clark’s chairmanship of the history department was the first to come under review.

 

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Albright (Cont'd).

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History

 

88OH251 A/F 340

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  December 13, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview session, A.D. Albright discusses attempts to revamp the University of Kentucky under John Oswald’s presidency.  He describes the rotation of department deans and chairs and the need to bring in “big names.”   He talks about assisting the faculty of discontinued programs and his own vision that UK could be a “prime instrument” for redirecting the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  He also discusses his personal and professional relationship with Governor Louie B. Nunn.  Albright then explains why he was never appointed as the president of the University of Kentucky, although he was an important administrator.  Albright discusses how the academic changes on campus had to keep up with the social changes that were occurring throughout the 1960s.

 

88OH252 A/F 341

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  December 20, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses student life during the 1960s and changes in the student body at this time.  He describes how the students were becoming more active in regards to university affairs and social issues, and he explains how student unrest hurt higher education.  He also addresses research issues and explains how money can be the driving force behind the kind of research that is conducted at a university.  Albright discusses the influence of social change on programs offered by a university, and explains why the University of Kentucky, which is located in the heart of horse country, never developed a veterinary school.  He describes the push within the Kentucky legislature for a veterinary school at Murray State University.  Albright also explains the increase in research at Northern Kentucky University after the Kroger Company’s national laboratories relocated to an area adjacent to NKU. 

 

89OH05 A/F 342

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  January 10, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview A.D. Albright talks about former UK basketball coach Adolph Rupp.  Albright describes Rupp as smart, persistent, and sometimes stubborn.  He discusses the influence of the basketball program on UK’s image.  Albright explains the problems caused by the lack of African Americans on the team, and attempts to integrate the team.  Albright also describes other athletic teams at UK, and recalls the relationship between the football coach, Charles I. Bradshaw, and UK President John Oswald. 

 

89OH07 A/F 343

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  January 17, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses the role of a board of trustees at an educational institution.  He explains the difference between members of the faculty and members of boards of trustees.  He describes why former governors Louie B. Nunn and Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt made such good floating board members.   He then talks about problems with Kentucky State University and what benefits could be garnered by an association between the University of Kentucky and KSU.  He discusses faculty performance and rewarding faculty for their research.  Albright also recalls an attempt to measure teaching results at Northern Kentucky University using the ACT test.

 

89OH10 A/F 344

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  January 24, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright, former University of Kentucky administrator, describes the place of special interest studies within the university, particularly women’s studies, black studies, and Appalachian studies.  He explains that these areas must serve a functional purpose.  Albright discusses the lack of female administrators at UK and at other colleges throughout the Commonwealth of Kentucky.  He describes the increasing demand for African Americans with a PhD, and their bargaining power due to the difficulty of universities in finding qualified minorities.  Albright also describes his own upbringing in respect to women and minorities.  He addresses stereotypes of groups within the university including the belief that librarians should be women and the faculty and staff of the agricultural college should be men.  Albright also recalls the change from twelve-month to nine-month contracts for faculty members.   

 

89OH11 A/F 345

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  January 31, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 20 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright describes business affairs at the University of Kentucky during President John Oswald’s administration.  He specifically mentions Robert Kerley, who Oswald hired to run business affairs.  Albright explains that the “whole tone and tenor” of the business aspects of the university changed during this time.  Albright also discusses university organization in general and the need to set priorities for higher education in Kentucky.  He then describes tenure and the duplication of academic programs at different Kentucky universities.

 

89OH45 A/F 350

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  February 7, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good   

Transcript:  First

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses the role of the University Press of Kentucky.  He explains that other universities in the state wanted to form their own presses, but instead the University Press became a consortium business by publishing the works of faculty from universities around the state of Kentucky.  Albright also discusses his responsibilities as executive vice president at UK in comparison to other administrators, and important women on UK’s campus throughout the twentieth century.  In particular he mentions Harriet Rose’s impact on student life, Abby Marlatt of the home economics department, Chloe Gifford in community development, and Doris Steward who received her doctorate in student personnel. 

  

89OH46 A/F 351

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  February 14, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses his role as an administrator at the University of Kentucky during the mid-1960s.  He describes UK President John Oswald and his wife, Rose, and their adjustment to Kentucky from California.  Albright states that Oswald never planned to stay at UK, but was determined to accomplish what he could in the short period of time that he was at the university.  Albright also discusses the University of Kentucky’s centennial celebration in 1965 on which the university spent $275,000.  Albright states that he was not happy with the “showy” festivities and that he preferred bringing distinguished visiting scholars to the university.  He was also not impressed by President Lyndon B. Johnson’s visit to UK in 1965 and describes Johnson’s speech and attitude at the graduation ceremony.

  

89OH47 A/F 352

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  February 28, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses the festivities and celebrations on campus during UK’s centennial and explains the ways that big events can become politicized and wasteful.  He describes the use of space on campus and property owned by the University of Kentucky.  He talks about the selection of a location for the football stadium and why he preferred the property at Coldstream farm.  Albright discusses the purchase of the Main Chance Farm by the University of Kentucky and the controversy that erupted over it.  According to Albright, there was a belief that UK had conspired with Keeneland to prevent another racetrack from being built on the land.  Albright also talks about the 1967 gubernatorial campaign, Rose Oswald’s illness and the effect it had on UK President John Oswald.

 

89OH80 A/F 353

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  March 7, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright describes university funding, estimating state revenues, and budgeting.  He talks about John Oswald’s support of desegregation in athletics.  He describes the psychology department at the University of Kentucky and graduate education at the university.  Albright discusses the large influx of graduate students to the university between 1963 and 1968 and the “adrenaline” that it brought to UK.  He states that there was a new focus on increasing research and bringing in new faculty.  Albright also talks about the use of admission tests including the ACT and GRE. He mentions John Oswald’s view of freedom of speech, especially in relation to increasing activism among students.

 

89OH81 A/F 354

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  March 14, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes   

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses attempts to merge the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville to create a new Commonwealth University of Kentucky.  Albright states that a merger was close to being created when it was made into a political issue.  He states that there was also fear of what would happen to the athletic system.  Albright compares the University of Kentucky to other institutions including Indiana University, and then he talks about the resignation of UK President John Oswald.  He describes Oswald’s national reputation and student and faculty support of Oswald.

 

89OH82 A/F 355

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  March 21, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses again John Oswald’s resignation as president of the University of Kentucky.  He explains how audits of the university and possible threats by Governor Louie B. Nunn may have affected Oswald’s decision to leave the university.  Albright also addresses the research conducted by UK over the years and states that the university still must encompass the entire state in their research efforts.  He mentions the transfer of coal research from UK to the University of Louisville.  Albright compares Oswald to David Roselle, who was president of UK at the time of this interview.  He then addresses the role of A.B. Kirwan as acting president after Oswald left the university.  He discusses criticism of Kirwan for not dealing directly with student issues, and the influence of Kirwan’s mother, Betty, in his appointment.  Albright mentions the search for a new president and why he did not pursue the position.  

 

89OH97 A/F 361 A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  April 4, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky  

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 10 minutes   

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this twenty-fourth interview session, A.D. Albright talks about university budgeting.  He explains the role of “suspense accounts,” which are special parts of the budget set up to cover withholding taxes.  He states that it is called a “suspense account,” because the university always wonders if they are going to make the expenses.  Albright discusses contingency funds which are for non-recurring emergency expenses or non-recurring expenditure items.

Albright also describes similarities between the problems of universities and governments.  He explains what problems may result if a university library system reports to an entity outside of the academic system of the institution.  He discusses the need to revamp public education and describes how average students are often overlooked at a university like UK.  

 

89OH98 A/F 362

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  April 18, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes   

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses funding for higher education including the difficulties of cutting costs.  He describes possible reactions when faculty salaries or student enrollment is cut.  Albright discusses the administration of President David Roselle, who was the president of the University of Kentucky at the time of this interview.  He also describes his sabbatical in 1969 when he went to Belgium on a Fulbright Scholarship.  While in Belgium, he studied eight universities to find what changes were needed.  He describes the many trips he took while living in Europe including a side trip to Africa.  His studies resulted in a book which was published by the Administrative Institute of the Universities in Belgium.  Albright arrived back in Lexington in the spring of 1970 just after the shootings of students on the Kent State University campus by Ohio National Guardsmen.

 

89OH99 A/F 363

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  April 25, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 20 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview A.D. Albright continues discussing his publication on the administrative and structural organization of universities in Belgium.  He describes some differences and similarities between institutions of higher-learning in Belgium and in the United States.  Albright then talks about Dr. Otis Singletary’s administration as the president of the University of Kentucky.  He states that he never truly understood Singletary’s vision of the future of UK.  He talks about Don Clapp’s relationship with Singletary.  Clapp took care of the budget for the university and may not have been completely honest with Singletary about the fiscal situation of the institution.  Albright also mentions John Stephenson, the dean of Undergraduate Studies, who later became president of Berea College.  Albright explains how John Oswald’s attempts to expand the University of Kentucky’s goals and student population to encompass the entire Commonwealth of Kentucky caused animosity among the local communities that had regional universities which continued throughout the Singletary administration.   

 

89OH121 A/F 366 A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  May 2, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 20 minutes   

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses the 1970-1971 school year which followed his return from his sabbatical in Belgium.  He describes the financial situation at the University of Kentucky, in particular the Penn Central investment scandal through which the university lost nearly a million dollars of University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF) and UK Athletic Association monies.  Albright provides his feelings that the university should not be in the stock market.

Albright also discusses Kayla Stroup’s role as president of Murray State University and the role of a university president in general.  He states that the growing emphasis on science and mathematics in higher education has resulted in a tendency to hire science and math PhD’s as university presidents.  He describes other trends in the backgrounds of university presidents over the past fifty years.  Albright then discusses teacher certification and changing the way that teachers are educated in Kentucky.

      

 89OH123 A/F 367 A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  May 9, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 20 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright continues to address Dr. Otis Singletary’s role as president of UK.  He states that the Singletary years brought both institutional change and greater    stability.  Albright examines the job of a university president, and states that universities are starting to emulate the corporate world in some of their practices.  He discusses the role of university libraries, and then describes student government at UK during the early 1970s.  Albright testified before a grand jury on the student movements on campus during this time and recalls that he told the jury that the student movement on campus was being overplayed.  He describes the differences between student activists during the 1970s and students in the 1980s, explaining that students are more institutionally oriented and more concerned with majoring in a subject that will eventually make them money.   

 

89OH124 A/F 368

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  May 16, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 20 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good  

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses the decision by the UK Board of Trustees to phase out financial support of the student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel.  He also describes the perception of the radio station on campus.  Albright discusses the move toward restrictive enrollment at UK in the fall of 1971 and its relationship to the community college system.  He talks about Wimberly Royster, former dean of Arts and Sciences, who was named dean of the Graduate School in the early 1970s.  He also mentions the construction of the Patterson Office Tower and how the idea for this building to house the College of Arts and Sciences grew out of a notion of convenience for students.

 

89OH136 A/F 369

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  June 6, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 10 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, A.D. Albright describes some current events in higher education.  He discusses the tendency of a university to isolate itself from the surrounding community and keep to itself.  He provides his opinions on changing the names of state “colleges” to state “universities.”  He describes Northern Kentucky University (NKU) during his tenure there and explains the attempt of the administration at NKU to create interdisciplinary schools.  He discusses the acceleration of the idea for regional universities and the growing belief throughout the 1970s that people should be able to get graduate and professional degrees near to their homes.  Albright talks about a push to get NKU to open a medical center and his resistance to that idea.  He also describes what traits he feels that an advocate for higher education in Kentucky should have.

 

89OH139 A/F 370

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  June 13, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour    

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses colleges of education and public education in Kentucky.  He states that teacher education programs have never truly been accepted as part of a liberal arts education.  Albright also discusses the court decision that led to the Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA). He explains that there is a need to revamp both the educational system and the governmental structure of Kentucky.  He discusses public school leaders in the state of Kentucky. 

 

89OH180 A/F 371

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  June 20, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview A.D. Albright describes Ted Gilbert, a former University of Kentucky Special Assistant for Institutional Planning.  Albright states that this was a transitory position for Gilbert, because the “planning function” was not central to the university at that time.  Albright also describes the transition of his own career from the University of Kentucky to the Council of Higher Education.  He states that he felt that something could be done with the council to help higher education in the state.  At the same time that he began considering a move to the Council of Higher Education, Murray State University was looking for a new president.  Although Albright interviewed for the position, he states that the job was not right for him and he took the job with the Council of Higher Education.  He describes the reaction of the press to his appointment.

 

89OH181 A/F 372

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  July 18, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright continues the discussion on educational reform in Kentucky in the late 1980s.  He describes the results of taking the management of education away from teachers, and his ideas for changes in the training of teachers.  Albright believes both that teachers should have a five year training program, and that educational reform requires built-in assessment.  Albright discusses higher education graduation rates and problems for students caused by the lack of good technical and vocational education in Kentucky.  He describes the “ivory tower notion” that academia is not interested in reform in elementary and secondary education.

Albright also discusses Kentucky’s regional colleges and the problems caused when they sought the same status that UK enjoyed.  He states that when the regional colleges changed to universities, it had a detrimental effect on undergraduate education.  Albright then describes the push to start a school of veterinary medicine at the University of Kentucky and his opposition to it. 

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