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Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: D - G  

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, faculty and alumni.
Last Updated: Aug 28, 2013 URL: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCOHWethingtonDG Print Guide Email Alerts

UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Davidson - Dysart Print Page
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Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Davidson - Dysart.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

76OH43 A/F 37

FRANK C. DAVIDSON

Date:  May 19, 1976

Location:  New York, New York

Interviewer:  William Cooper

Length:  50 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

Dr. Frank C. Davidson was a professor of Speech and Drama at City College of New York.  Originally from Barbourville, Kentucky, he enrolled at the University of Kentucky in 1926 and he describes his experiences as a student. He states that he considered a career in journalism, and recalls that Dr. Marguerite McLaughlin was one of his best professors. Davidson was also president of a student theater group called the Strollers. He talks about Frank Fowler, an English professor who supported this group, and was in charge of the Guignol Theater. He recalls attending Dr. Frank L. and Mary Frances Jewell McVey’s open house once a week.  Davidson remembers how his UK degree helped him get into the Yale School of Drama, where he received his Master’s in Fine Arts. He later received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from New York University and an Honorary Doctorate in Literature from Union College in Barbourville, Kentucky.

Davidson talks about Sarah Blanding, the Dean of Women at UK, how she disciplined the female students, and recalls a visit with her at Vassar College. He mentions his membership in a junior honorary group called the Mystic 13, and recalls the group was kicked off campus for burning new members with silver nitrate. The group was later called the Lances. Davidson discusses his membership in two senior honorary groups, Omicron Delta Kappa and the Lamp and Cross. Davidson also describes his experiences of doing American plays overseas for one year with the State Department, and one year in South America on a Princeton grant. He emphasizes the important things about life that he learned at UK. He was a member of the UK Alumni Association’s Board of Directors.  He received the Distinguished Service Award from UK and notes that he is a Kentucky Colonel.

 

76OH06 A/F 17

BERKELEY DAVIS  

Date: January 15, 1976

Location:  Washington, D. C.

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions:  None

Berkeley Davis is originally from Lewisport in western Kentucky. He states that he was always interested in engineering and met other graduates of the University of Kentucky while in high school, which influenced his decision to attend UK. He enrolled at UK in 1929 and majored in Engineering. Davis recalls this was during the Depression when there was an underlying seriousness about education on the campus. He recalls Dean of Engineering, F. Paul Anderson as the “vision man”, who was in ill health, and Assistant Dean William E. Freeman as the “inside man”, who became acting dean when Anderson died. Davis remembers that corporations provided research grants, and that the Carrier Corporation funded research work with heating, ventilation, and cooling systems (HVAC) on campus. He notes the company’s founders, Willis Carrier and Irvine Lyle, were UK engineering graduates. He recalls several professors, in particular Daniel V. Terrell.

Davis describes fraternity life with Alpha Sigma Phi, when the Dean of Men used to visit the fraternity houses, have dinner, and observe the decorum of the houses. He discusses the political climate at UK, and mentions the “technocracy movement.”  He feels that the community relationship between UK and Lexington was poor and emphasizes that the same situation existed at Transylvania University. Davis talks about daily life and social activities on and off campus during this time. He refers to bootlegging, and notes that students did not have a problem getting what they needed for parties. He remembers playing on the basketball team his freshman year when John “Sonny” Mauer was the coach, and that Adolph Rupp became coach in his sophomore year. Davis talks about Rupp and describes the team’s road trips, usually by train, during which they were expected to keep up with their studies.

 

92OH68 A/F 461

ELIZABETH JEWELL DAVIS  

Date:  January 23, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Elizabeth Jewell Davis, niece of Mary Frances Jewell McVey, wife of former UK President Frank L. McVey, talks about the custom of attending family funerals by invitation only. She describes some of her family’s history and discusses at great length the interpersonal relationships of the Jewell family and her aunt’s marriage to Dr. Frank L. McVey.  Davis was born in Pleasantview, Wilmore, Kentucky in 1916, and her family moved to Lexington, Kentucky in 1920. Davis recalls John Jacob Niles entertaining the family and guests at supper. She talks about her aunt, Mary Frances Jewell McVey or “Aunt Frank” as she was known to the family. Davis attended Pine Manor in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, and stayed at Maxwell Place while taking classes at UK. Davis mentions she married her husband in 1942, and states he was number one in his class at UK, and that his good friend, future Kentucky Governor Bert T. Combs, was number two.

Davis notes that Frances did not have children but that she helped many UK students from the mountains to adjust to life in town. She notes that Frances McVey was one of the founders of the Junior League of Lexington. Davis talks about racial climate of the time, and states that McVey worked with people in the black community despite segregation.  McVey also sought to create a woman’s culture on campus, and worked hard for more opportunities for women. She mentions her aunt’s friendship with Sarah Blanding, UK’s Dean of Women and the first female president of Vassar College. Davis believes Frank McVey and her aunt “had a beautiful relationship.” Davis recalls her aunt’s funeral, which was very well attended, and remembers that the flowers covered the floor of church. Davis mentions details about her aunt’s will and talks about her aunt’s illness. McVey developed lung cancer and died at the age of 55.

 

97OH20 A/F 567

LILLIAN G. DELANEY  

Date:  June 11, 1997

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Karen Ellenberg

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Lillian G. Delaney was born in 1925 and is a native of Lexington, Kentucky. She was the second of five daughters. She talks about her parents, Ethel Carter and Wallace Gillespie, both of whom were from Woodford County, Kentucky.  Her father received only an elementary education and was a mechanic for Taylor Tire; her mother did graduate from high school but worked in the home.  She remembers that her father, who died before she went to college, provided well for the family during the Great Depression. Delaney talks about her education in Lexington and mentions various teachers.

Delaney discusses how segregation affected her family and recalls they learned at home how to deal with segregation outside of the black community. She notes that Lexington “was not as bad as some other places further south,” but remembers having limited contact with white people while growing up. She graduated from Dunbar High School and attended Kentucky State University, where she pursued a double major in Chemistry and Sociology, and was a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.  She recalls that it was more expensive to attend KSU, but UK was not open to blacks at that time. Delaney recalls the only employment opportunities open for black women during this time were in teaching or the medical field. She worked as a playground director with the Parks and Recreation Department during the summers while she was in college.

After graduation Delaney went to Maysville, Kentucky in 1946 to teach mathematics and physics for one year. She mentions the “dual salary” system, where white teachers were paid more than blacks for the same position, but this was not the situation when she came back to Fayette County to teach. She attended graduate school at The Ohio State University in the summer of 1949 for additional core curriculum work. She notes that UK was open to blacks, but it was difficult obtain admission. The following year she transferred to UK and earned her Master’s degree in 1952. She also became certified to teach physical education. Delaney taught at Douglas High School from 1947-1963. She describes the process of desegregation of the schools during this period. Delaney moved to Leestown Middle School for one year, then transferred to Tates Creek High School where she became the first African-American instructor.

 

81OH87 A/F 144

STEPHEN DIACHUN 

Date:  August 13, 1981

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer: Terry Birdwhistell and Bruce Denbo

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Dr. Stephen Diachun came to the University of Kentucky from the University of Illinois with a group of graduate students performing mycological research work associated with plant pathology in eastern Kentucky. His instructor at U of I wanted him to work with Dr. William Dorney Valleau, and arranged a meeting. Diachun explains that he was an undergraduate assistant at Rhode Island University with Dr. Frank Howard, a prominent mycologist. He talks about his decision to stay at UK to work on his dissertation. He mentions that the College of Agriculture had dual appointments during that time. Diachun began teaching at UK when Valleau suggested he take over one of his classes. Diachun states that he places equal value on teaching and research, and emphasizes that a university is responsible for providing both. 

He talks about his role in the move towards a “more quality university” as a member of the Cook Committee, and the Committee of Fifteen. The Cook Committee’s main suggestion was the decision to implement the controversial policy of rotating chairmanships as opposed to permanent department heads, which gave the faculty further influence.  Diachun also discusses the problems and challenges that face faculty and administrators during tough economic times, and the role of the faculty at a university. Diachun remembers trying to convince former President Frank G. Dickey to stay at UK, and that he was appointed to a selection committee that was assembled to choose Dickey’s replacement. Diachun and other members suggested several candidates, including Dr. John W. Oswald, and talks about the decision-making process involved with this appointment, and the impact that Oswald made at UK during his tenure. Diachun emphasizes his view that it is the faculty’s responsibility to help support research.

 

88OH74 A/F 321

BETTY DICKEY 

Date:  May 10, 1988

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Betty Dickey was born in St. Joseph, Missouri and says she is adopted. She came to Lexington, Kentucky with her family when she was fifteen. Her father, Ira Drymon, was a manager for Dixiana Farm, then leased Gallaher Farm for his own purposes. Her mother was Ruth Newell Barnes. She recalls she left a wonderful girls’ basketball team and came to a state that had just outlawed girls’ basketball, “and nearly died.”  She finished high school at Bryan Station High School in Lexington. She met her husband, Frank G. Dickey, in high school, where he was a student teacher.  Dickey enrolled at Transylvania University in 1939, where her husband was also an undergraduate student. She recalls her first impression of her future husband as “a neat package.”

Dickey recalls when her husband went into the army during World War II and talks at length about her experiences in Florida during his basic training. She moved back to Lexington to live with her parents, when her husband shipped out to California. She says he earned his doctorate upon his return, and they both taught in public schools. The Dickeys had three children, and she talks about her experiences as a mother as well as a wife. She recalls her husband went to teach at UK, eventually became dean of the College of Education, and was asked to attend an “outside” university to do post-doctoral work. He was accepted at Harvard University, so they moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts for one year.

Dickey’s husband was eventually appointed president of UK, and she describes the move to Maxwell Place, improvements that needed to be made, the responsibilities of the position, and life on campus with the children. Dickey talks at length about the experiences of adjusting to the university lifestyle, becoming a focal point, and their social obligations. She reflects on her husband’s tenure at UK, and reminisces about the good times as well as the challenging ones. Dickey mentions Governors A.B. “Happy” Chandler and Bert T. Combs. She talks about the atmosphere of the John W. Oswald, A.D. Kirwan, Otis A. Singletary, and David Roselle administrations.

 

77OH05 A/F 50

FRANK G. DICKEY

Date: February 2, 1977

Location:  Washington, D. C.

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Dr. Frank G. Dickey recalls his family moved to Lexington, Kentucky when he was ten years old.  He completed his undergraduate work at Transylvania University. Dickey talks about his early experiences at the University of Kentucky while he was pursuing his doctoral degree, and his decision to stay in the Education Department after meeting with Dean William Taylor. Dickey remembers his experiences in the capacity of assistant dean, then acting dean of the College of Education when Taylor became ill and suddenly died. He recalls meeting with UK President Herman L. Donovan, where he was asked to accept the position of dean.  In 1952 Dickey accepted a one-year fellowship at Harvard University and talks about this experience.

Dickey discusses Donovan’s tenure at UK, remembers when blacks were first allowed to attend graduate school at UK, and mentions the Kentucky Day Law. He feels that integration was handled smoothly by the university. Dickey discusses his appointment as the youngest president of UK, and states that Donovan avoided any participation in the selection process. Dickey remembers that the group that supported former President Frank L. McVey was cool towards Donovan, and consequently, they were also reticent towards Dickey during his tenure, but he states this did not affect his administration. Dickey reminisces about his open door policy and talks about his relationship with A.B. “Happy” Chandler. Dickey discusses the case of Dr. Gladys Kammerer, a Political Science professor who sued UK for infringement of her academic freedom after her position was terminated. He admits that he made his decision in error without all of the facts, and remembers what he learned from this experience. He established a Faculty-Trustee Committee on Academic Freedom as a result of this incident. 

Dickey describes the difficulties of integrating the new Chandler Medical Center into the university during his administration. He mentions his discussion with Chandler about the battle over whether coal or gas should be used in the facility, and the decision to use coal. Dickey discusses at length how the funds were procured for new construction during this time, and gives credit to Frank Peterson, who was vice-president of business affairs, for his knowledge of financing.

 

88OH58 A/F 319 FRANK G. DICKEY

Date: April 11, 1988

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 2 hours 10 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Frank G. Dickey, former president of the University of Kentucky, begins this interview by discussing the early experiences that influenced his decision to go into teaching. He recalls it was primarily a family tradition since many family members were teachers, and he talks about their educational backgrounds. He remembers his experiences in the army at a training battalion headquarters in Fort Blanding, Florida.

Dickey describes University of Kentucky President Dr. Herman L. Donovan. He notes Donovan’s interest in all aspects of education in Kentucky, not just higher education. Dickey discusses the social responsibilities of the president and his wife at Maxwell Place as well as on campus, and talks about Mrs. Donovan’s graciousness in assisting Mrs. Dickey with some of these responsibilities.  Dickey talks about opposition to President Donovan by friends and supporters of President Frank L. McVey.  Dickey feels that he had inherited some of these lingering feelings of disdain during his tenure because he was considered “a Donovan man.”

Dickey discusses the concept of change including shifting attitudes towards tenure. Dickey talks about the planning and building of the Chandler Medical Center. He discusses the comparisons made of Donovan to Harry Truman.  Dickey recalls his transition to the presidency as a smooth process and mentions several individuals who helped him with this, Donovan in particular. Dickey discusses some of the programs developed during his first year in office, including the Committee of Fifteen. He talks about the development of the community college system and notes this plan was actually started in the late 1940s. He discusses at length his experiences with various deans and vice-presidents at UK. Dickey reflects on his relationship with several Kentucky governors, as well as the role of Kentucky politics in the operation of the university, and the necessity for political acumen for a UK president.

 

88OH72 A/F 320

FRANK G. DICKEY

Date:  April 22, 1988

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  2 hours

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Frank G. Dickey begins this interview by talking about the UK Board of Trustees during his tenure as president of the University of Kentucky, and recalls that the board addressed questions of policy as well as administration. Dickey remembers the board’s decision to name the new UK Medical Center after Governor A.B. “Happy” Chandler. He talks about funding and felt that the president’s job of asking for money was the one he disliked the most. He felt that the state was responsible for supporting a state institution, and that he was not always comfortable with the political aspects of his job. Dickey briefly talks about his family’s adjustment regarding the move to Maxwell Place. He describes the responsibilities of his position, and mentions several individuals who he turned to as advisors.  He states that his relationship with the faculty was “friendly and supportive” throughout his tenure.

Dickey discusses the establishment of the Committee of Fifteen, a group that was formed to plan for the 100th anniversary of the university. He describes the changes in the makeup of the student body after World War II, the increase in the foreign student population, and the movement towards a student body who took a more active role in university policy decisions. He talks about Coach Adolph Rupp and the integration of basketball and other athletics at UK. He talks about the expansion of UK including the purchase of the Coldstream and Spindletop properties. He describes the retirement system which was implemented on the last day of his presidency.

Dickey resigned as president of UK in 1963 and moved to Atlanta, Georgia to assume the position of executive director of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In 1965 he moved to Washington, D.C. and became the executive director of the National Commission on Accrediting. He discusses these and other appointments he has held since his departure from UK.  Dickey mentions Dr. Paul Sharp, who had accepted the position as his replacement, only to be supplanted by John W. Oswald three weeks later. He also mentions the roles of Presidents A.D. Kirwan and Otis A. Singletary.  Dickey discusses Kentucky’s perception of the importance of education, and talks about the legacy of his own administration.

 

00OH76 A/F 605

FRANK G. DICKEY

Date:  June 20, 1997

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Sharon Childs

Length:  2 hours

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: Permission of Sharon Childs Required

 

 

84OH93 A/F 150

CHARLIE DIXON 

Date:  September 6, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Charlie Dixon was born in Skyline, Letcher County, Kentucky in 1914. He graduated from high school in 1933, and in 1937 he received a B.S. degree in Agriculture from the University of Kentucky.  He then earned his M.S. degree in Animal Science at Cornell University in 1939, and his M.P.A. from Harvard University in 1958. Dixon completed other graduate work at UK and the University of Tennessee.  He started his agricultural career as an assistant county agent in Fayette County, Kentucky in 1939.  He was an assistant county agent in Fayette, Whitley, and Laurel Counties from 1939-1941, served as the county agricultural agent in Clay and Morgan Counties from 1941-1954, and was the area county agent in farm and home development in Jackson, Kentucky from 1954-1957.  In June, 1958 he took a position as a specialist in the areas of programs, rural development, and community development.

Dixon, who was known as “Mr. Development,” describes his work with the Kentucky Development Committee, where he served as secretary for many years. Dixon talks about the committee’s goal to work cooperatively with rural communities to make them more attractive to industry. He mentions several key people who helped with “this interagency cooperative effort.” After he retired on June 30, 1974 Dixon continued to work for six years in Frankfort, Kentucky for state government in what is now the Water Division, where he worked water development and management plans for the state. Dixon talks about his work with state and federal agencies, especially the Ohio River Basin Commission, which was assigned the responsibility of comprehensive water management plans for the Ohio River Basin. He says sub-plans were developed for each river basin and mentions each of these. He emphasizes the importance of his experience with the Cooperative Extension Service in working with interagency groups, and states that it was invaluable in the formulation of these plans. He mentions his community activities and his work with the National Association for Retired Federal Employees (NARF).

 

92OH115 A/F 479

JAMES DONNELLY

Date:  Unknown 

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Unknown

Length:  Unknown

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

James H. Donnelly, Jr. is a professor of Marketing at the University of Kentucky.  Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1941, Donnelly enrolled as an undergraduate student at Pace University in New York City. He received his B.S. degree in Marketing in 1963, and was the recipient of the New York Chapter of the American Marketing Association’s Marketing Student of the Year Award.  He completed his M.B.A. in 1964 at Long Island University. He worked his way through school as a musician; he plays piano and says it is his avocation. Donnelly earned his D.B.A. in Marketing from the University of Maryland in 1968, and was initiated into Beta Gamma Sigma, the business honorary society. Donnelly has twice received the UK Alumni Association’s Great Teacher Award. In 1990 he was an inaugural recipient of the Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Teaching, and in 1991 he received the Beta Gamma Sigma Outstanding Teacher Award. He states that he comes from a family of teachers.

Donnelly came to UK as an assistant professor of Marketing in 1968. He feels that one of the great benefits of education is that it gives a person the ability to analyze and to be objective. He thinks that as a students’ education levels increase, so does their self-confidence. He finds this to be particularly applicable with students from more rural areas of Kentucky. Donnelly talks about his daily activities on campus and emphasizes that anyone can be a good teacher, but that organization is key.  Donnelly emphasizes he values his autonomy, and notes that he is a self-starter and is not closely supervised. He describes his unit as well as the College of Business and states that they are a cohesive group who work well together. Donnelly explains that he receives a yearly evaluation of his work in the areas of teaching, research, and service. He also discusses some of his consulting work and executive programs that he teaches around the country and overseas.

 

84OH154 A/F 170

KELCY DRISKILL 

Date:  December 6, 1984

Location:  Bowling Green, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  40 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Excellent

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Kelcy Driskill was born in 1922 in Livingston County, Kentucky. He received his B.S. degree in Agriculture from the University of Kentucky and his Master’s degree in Arts and Education and Social Sciences from Western Kentucky University. He was an assistant agent-in-training in Washington County, Kentucky and talks about the duties and responsibilities of this position, especially the 4-H Club programs. Driskill was an assistant county agent in Warren and Lincoln Counties and later became the county agent in Warren County.  He talks at length about the work in the county such as the burning of broom sage and replacing fescue with red clover for effective pasture renovation, as well as programs with dairy, beef, swine, forages, and crop production. He mentions his television and radio programs. Driskill emphasizes the importance of the county’s involvement in the Kentucky State Fair, where standards are set for production practices, and states this provides a training ground for 4-H youth in county and state. He says it is a county agent’s role to encourage people to participate.

Driskill discusses the role of the County Cooperative Extension Council, that it represents all areas of extension, and that it is the base of the extension program. He talks about the Cooperative Extension District Board, its work with the budget, and the importance of getting to know people in order to do an effective job. Driskill mentions that various farm organizations that have been available and utilized so that people had a farm voice in various political issues when extension needed help. He emphasizes that the College of Agriculture has given him the support he has needed over the years so that “he can work with people to help themselves.” Driskill discusses the need for communication, and updated computers for dissemination of current research information. He talks about his wife and family.

 

85OH218 A/F 277

MIKE DUFF  

Date:  October 1-3, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer: Muriel Duff

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

This interview was conducted by Mike Duff’s wife.  Mike Duff was born in Allais, Kentucky, near Hazard in 1922. He graduated from Witherspoon College High School in 1941, and attended Berea College from 1941 until 1943, when he joined the army. While in the service he received a certificate in Geology from American University in 1945. After World War II, Duff came to the University of Kentucky where he received his B.S. in Agriculture.  He received his M.S. degree in Dairy Science from The Ohio State University in 1950. In 1960 Duff earned his Ph.D. in Extension Administration, with assistance from the Kellogg Foundation, at the University of Wisconsin. Duff talks about his early experiences with the UK College of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension Services. After graduation from UK, he worked with the Veteran’s Teaching Program in Sadieville, Kentucky where he helped veterans learn how to farm more efficiently. Duff was also a vocational agriculture instructor in Irvine, Kentucky and worked with the Kentucky Poultry Improvement Association. He notes these experiences helped him later in his career as an extension specialist. He talks about his many appointments with the College of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension Service as a specialist in various counties and as the assistant director of development programs.

Duff discusses his work as coordinator with the Rural Development Program, an inter-agency group program focusing their resources statewide. He assisted in many training workshops and agent training programs, and served as an advisor in Chile from 1962 until 1963, with the United States Agency for Rural Institute of Development. He also traveled to Notre Dame University in 1964 and 1965, and assisted in training Peace Corps volunteers to work with this overseas program. He talks at length about the improvements made in people’s lives as a result of the Appalachian Resource Development Project, later called the Eastern Kentucky Resource Development Project (E.K.R.D.P.) carried out by the UK’s College of Agriculture Cooperative Extension Service between 1961 and 1968 in thirty counties of eastern Kentucky. Duff refers to problems and successes with the Appalachian Community Impact Project (A.C.I.P.), a related project which focused on Breathitt, Leslie, and Perry counties. In 1972 he became a specialist for development programs. Duff talks about the history, formation, and implementation of the Kentucky Development Committee. He mentions his many awards, publications, and his family.

 

90OH49 A/F 398

CATHERINE H. DUNNE  

Date:  March 28, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Catherine H. Dunne was born in Louisville, Kentucky, where her father, Patrick Dunne, had a Thoroughbred racing stable. She recalls her father first became interested in the horse business through Edward Corrigan, who built Hawthorne Race Track in Cicero, Illinois.  She mentions Governor Charles Evans Hughes of New York, who persuaded the state legislature to outlaw horse racing and recalls that, around the turn of the century, there was virtually no horse racing in any state but Kentucky for about six years. Dunne talks about her childhood, and recalls traveling the racing circuit by train.  As a result, she attended many different schools until horse racing was suspended, then they moved to Kansas City where Dunne graduated from high school in 1919. Her mother persuaded her and her sister to attend Dominican College, a private all-girls boarding school in New Orleans, which she attended from 1919-1921 while her father was racing there. She remembers several of the Dominican nuns had degrees from Oxford University.

Dunne’s family came to Lexington in 1921 where she enrolled at the University of Kentucky. She talks about several instructors including John Thomas Cotton Noe, who taught art appreciation. She recalls she was not impressed with the level of instruction at UK compared to what she received at Dominican College, and that the local students kept to themselves. Dunne mentions places where the family lived on the west side of Lexington during this time, as well as families her father knew, such as the Maddens and the Youngs.  She talks about her experiences on campus and mentions various people from that time such as Sarah Blanding.  Dunne taught in Lexington until 1969, and she describes some of her experiences.  She returned to UK in the 1940s to get her Master’s degree. She talks about the difference in focus between male and female teachers, and feels that women were more interested in teaching and men were more interested in sports.

 

77OH44 A/F 64

LORA ROBINSON DYSART

Date: June 9, 1977

Location:  Morgantown, North Carolina

Interviewer:  William Cooper

Length:  35 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Lora Robinson Dysart enrolled at the University of Kentucky in 1916 and graduated in 1920 with a B.S. degree in Botany.  Originally from Paducah, Kentucky, Dysart recalls that she was overwhelmed at first by the university environment.  She talks about various instructors she had during this time, including Mary Frances Jewell McVey. She mentions that Dr. William Funkhouser, who was chair of the Department of Zoology and dean of the Graduate School at UK, was one of the first explorers of the Okefenokee Swamp (now the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge) before he came to UK. Dysart talks about living in a dormitory on campus, Patterson Hall, and says most of the social activities were at the fraternity and sorority houses. She talks about her membership in the Rafinesque Botany Club, of which she was secretary and president, where they talked about subjects not covered in class and went on field trips. Dysart was also a Blue Ridge delegate to meetings held at an assembly near Black Mountain, North Carolina for the YWCA and YMCA.

Dysart recalls some of the daily activities on UK’s campus during that time and mentions some of the regulations students were asked to follow, such as daily attendance at chapel and a whistle which was used to change classes. She remembers former UK President James K. Patterson and President Frank L. McVey. She describes the university closing down at the onset of World War I and the influenza pandemic in 1918. She mentions the tradition of holding pep rallies before football and basketball games.

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