Skip to main content

WRD 111: Composition & Communication II: 4a. Types of Periodicals

the second course in the composition & communication sequence, in which students compose written, spoken, and multimedia arguments about public issues. Summer 2010.

Scholarly

Also known as academic, refereed, or peer-reviewed journals.

Examples: Camera Obscura, Foreign Affairs, Journal of Social & Clinical Psychology, Networks

Purpose & Value:  To report on original research or analysis in an academic field or discipline. 

Authors: Professors, researchers or scholars in an academic field or discipline. Credentials are always provided.

Language
: Specialized or technical language of the academic  discipline or field.

Sources: 
Footnotes and/or bibliographies to document the sources of the author’s research.

Publishers:  Professional organizations, universities, research institutes, and  scholarly presses.

Appearance:  Lengthy articles often structured in the following format: abstract, literature review, methodology, results, conclusion, bibliography. graphs, charts or tables supporting the text of the article.

Trade Magazines

Also known as professional or industry journals, newsletters, or magazines.

Examples: Chemical & Engineering News, Occupational Outlook Quarterly, Restaurant Business

Purpose & Value:  To provide information on current trends, news and events to people in a particular industry or profession. 

Authors: Practitioners or journalists with subject expertise.

Language: Jargon of the industry or profession understood by practitioners.

Sources: Occasionally includes brief footnotes and/or bibliographies.

Publishers:  Commercial/trade publishers or professional associations.

Appearance:  Brief articles. Photographs and illustrations to support article and attract reader. Ads that support profession/industry.

Popular

Also known as general interest magazines

Examples: National Geographic, New Republic, Sports Illustrated, Time

Purpose & Value:  To provide current news and events to the general public with intention to entertain or persuade. Good source for popular culture.

Authors: Journalists or free-lance writers.

Language: Non-technical, often simple, language

Sources: May refer to sources but not cited in full.

Publishers: Commercial/trade publishers

Appearance:  Brief articles.  Photographs and illustrations. Lots of color. Extensive ads for general public.

Newspapers

Examples: Financial Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post

Purpose & Value:  To report on current news and events. Good for local and regional news, analysis and opinion on current events. 

Authors:  Journalists or free-lance writers.

Language: Language for general educated audience. 

Sources: Occasionally includes brief sources.

Publishers: Commercial/trade publishers

Appearance:  Brief articles. Photographs and illustrations to support article and attract reader. Some ads.

Tip!

While it can be difficult to distinguish the various types of periodicals when they are in electronic format, many databases now allow researchers to initially search by or later sort their results by type of publication.