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Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: A - B: UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Albright - Barlow

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, its faculty and alumni.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Albright - Allen.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

89OH182 A/F 373

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  August 1, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes  

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses problems in elementary and secondary education in Kentucky.  He states that part of the problem at the time of this interview is that the schools were responsible for a host of social problems in addition to educating young people.  He feels another problem is that the schools do not know what they want to be or what they should be.  Albright also discusses the expansion of community colleges into rural areas, and believes that they should not be allowed to extend themselves as much.  Albright then addresses his role on the Council of Higher Education and Kentucky’s need for a system of higher education.   

 

89OH185 A/F 374

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  August 8, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright talks about control in higher education and the role accountability plays.  Albright explains how difficult it is to measure the effectiveness of higher education since the results are not always obvious at first.  He discusses funding problems for higher education, especially in Kentucky, and states that Kentucky is going to need to be prepared to make changes.  Albright describes the need to gain more public support for higher education and the need to use the research aspects of UK to find solution to the problems of Kentucky.  Albright also explains how research completed by institutions like the University of Kentucky depends on what areas can bring funding.

 

89OH225 A/F 375

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  August 8, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes  

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses tenure issues that arose in the 1970s at Kentucky’s universities.  He states that when funding was low, the university gave increases in title and rank rather than increases in salaries.  In addition to this, the regional universities in Kentucky grew at such a rapid pace that they hired many new faculty members at one time, who were then in line for tenure at the same time.  Albright states that the issue was particularly harsh at Murray State University, but explains that the University of Kentucky was able to avoid much of the controversy because they had traditionally emphasized the importance of research and publication for their faculty members.  The regional universities, though, had traditionally emphasized good teaching and public service as requirements for tenure.  Albright also mentions lawsuits that occurred as a result of those tenure issues and the involvement of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP).

Albright describes some of his experiences working for the Council of Higher Education.  He mentions Barney Tucker and criticism of both the staff and budget of the council.  He discusses duplication of similar academic programs throughout Kentucky and the need for universities to focus on specific programs and bolster those programs.  He explains how he would pick five programs the University of Kentucky should focus on improving.

 

89OH226 A/F 376

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  August 29, 1989

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes  

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright continues to describe his experiences with the Kentucky Council of Higher Education.  He discusses political influence on the council and his own reaction to criticism of the council due to its large staff and budget.  He talks about the difficulties of recruiting new personnel since the council offered non-competitive salaries.  Albright describes what he looked for in new employees, including the importance of experience.

Albright discusses the relationship of the council with governors Julian Carroll and Wendell Ford, and states that Ford did not interfere with the council too much and this gave the council time to consolidate.  In the mid-1970s, the Northern Kentucky University Board of Trustees approached Albright about taking over the presidency of the institution.  Albright talks about Governor Carroll’s involvement in the offer.  He then discusses the issue of unfair allocations to the universities of the state.  Dr. Otis Singletary, then president of the University of Kentucky, became upset when the University of Louisville received a higher per student allocation than UK.  Kentucky State University also received higher allocations, and Albright describes how KSU almost became part of the UK community college system.  He mentions President Constantine W. Curris of Murray State University, and changes in higher education in Kentucky during the 1975-1976 school year as Robert Martin of Eastern Kentucky University and Adron Doran of Morehead State University stepped down as presidents and he prepared to take over NKU’s presidency.

 

89OH242 A/F 378

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  September 5, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 10 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In the mid-1970s, A.D. Albright was preparing to change jobs from the head of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education to the presidency of Northern Kentucky University.  Albright states that at this time there were cuts in funding for higher education, and that there was a prevailing feeling that the rapid expansion of higher education had brought people who should not be there.  Albright recalls a report from the Council on Higher Education that advised limiting law school enrollments.  He discusses the three law schools in Kentucky; UK, the University of Louisville, and Chase Law School at Northern Kentucky University.  Albright states that he does not feel that Kentucky needs three law schools, but he explains the differences between institutions, particularly the fact that the University of Louisville and Chase were better geared to handle older and working students.

Albright also talks about Northern Kentucky University specifically and the problems which resulted in former President Frank Steely’s resignation.  Albright believes that Steely was a good scholar, but was probably more inclined to run a small private institution.  Albright believes that people in northern Kentucky were more eager to get NKU running rather than taking time to lay out the structure.  He feels that NKU was lacking a mission, and he states that he and others wanted to see NKU develop an effective undergraduate program.  He discusses his decision to go to NKU and explains that he only intended to stay for two or three years.  He describes things that hurt the university including the lack of initial planning and his successor at the Council on Higher Education, Harry Snyder.

 

89OH243 A/F 379

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  September 12, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses Harry Snyder’s role as head of the Kentucky Council on Higher Education.  Albright explains that certain members turned against Snyder.  Albright also provides some details about his move to Northern Kentucky University, and states that his reasons for going to Northern included the need for higher education in that area, strong support from the board and the fact that the institution was new and that there was much that could be done.  He talks about making changes at NKU and setting up planning groups.  Albright explains that there was an attempt to create “clusters” of disciplines rather than schools, but that this was not implemented.  Albright describes setting up an honors program at NKU and talks about how he helped out Thomas More College, a small Catholic liberal arts college in northern Kentucky, in their search for a new president.

 

89OH244 A/F 380

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  September 21, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses UK funding issues as of 1989 and media coverage.  He states that the university needs to be concerned with the effectiveness of state and local government.  He describes the growing importance of diversity education in institutions of higher learning and UK in particular.  He talks about the honors program that he helped to establish at NKU and explains how he cut the number of graduate programs while he was president at Morehead State University.  Albright also talks about the political role of community colleges, and college entrance exam testing.

 

89OH258 A/F 381

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  October 3, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In this interview A.D. Albright describes his living arrangement upon his arrival at Northern Kentucky University.  He and his wife lived in an apartment in Ft. Thomas, Kentucky until living quarters could be arranged on campus.  He describes differences between the faculty at NKU and that of Murray and Morehead state universities, and he discusses the German-heritage of northern Kentucky.

Albright talks about the moral decision that must be made when monetary gifts are made to the university.  He talks about gifts he turned down at NKU and at the University of Kentucky.   Albright also mentions the role of partnerships between businesses and universities, and provides details on how he was able to get the Kroger Company to establish a research laboratory at NKU. 

 

89OH282 A/F 387

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  October 31, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright recalls his experiences as the president of Northern Kentucky University.  He talks about NKU as a non-residential university and controversies that arose over the perceived need for an increased emphasis on student affairs.  Albright discusses the history of NKU and how it developed out of the University of Kentucky’s extension program.  He describes the need for a cooperative program of higher education throughout Kentucky and how technology like televised classes could help with this.

 

89OH283 A/F 388

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  November 7, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright describes moving Northern Kentucky University’s location from Covington to Highland Heights, Kentucky.  He talks about getting the new university up and running.  He talks about the sports programs at NKU and his own concern for academic programs.  He states that although he was president of NKU for seven years, he did not intend to stay that long.  Albright discusses the establishment of Chase Law School at NKU and the need for emphasizing undergraduate programs at NKU.  He also describes diversity education and the need for innovation in higher education.

 

89OH284 A/F 389

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  November 15, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright looks back over his tenure as president of Northern Kentucky University.  He states that stabilization of the institution was one of his major accomplishments.  He describes changes in the faculty and facilities, and believes that his role in increasing the number of female faculty members was also important.  He discusses his relationship with the board of trustees at NKU, and mentions Ken Lucas as an effective board chairman.  Albright also provides his theories on the role of university presidents as a whole, and describes how he has dealt with controversial topics in higher education administration.  He talks about the student culture at Northern Kentucky University which was designed as a commuter school, and his disapproval of an attempt to increase the number of dorms at NKU.  Albright mentions his wife’s experiences while living in northern Kentucky.

 

89OH324 A/F 391

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  December 5, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  45 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In this interview A.D. Albright discusses the resignation of President David Roselle of the University of Kentucky.  He compares and contrasts Roselle to former UK President John Oswald.  Albright also talks about traits of educational leaders, stating that they often are poor communicators.  He describes the differences between politics and education in Kentucky and other states, and explains how educational funding is unique in Kentucky.

 

89OH326 A/F 392 A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  December 12, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright describes his short “retirement” upon leaving the presidency of Northern Kentucky University.  He states that although he had the opportunity to go to England, he chose not to at that time and instead moved back to Lexington where he served as an educational consultant to the mayor.  Albright describes Mayor Scotty Baesler and their relationship.  He discusses his transition to this different kind of pace.

Albright then moves to his involvement with Morehead State University.  Morehead’s president, Morris Norfleet, asked for Albright’s help with some problems at the university and Albright went to Morehead to investigate.  Albright states that he wrote a report which recommended, among other things, cutting some of the master degree programs.  Albright recalls that the report caused some controversy, but further problems were caused when Norfleet began making changes to the university without consulting other administrators.  After a new board of trustees was appointed by Governor Martha Layne Collins, the new board recommended him as the new president.  Albright describes the negotiations that led to his agreement to take over as the new president of the university.

 

90OH95 A/F 399

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  March 15, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses higher-education funding issues in the Kentucky legislature.  He mentions a controversy over the Robinson Forest and mining rights owned by the University of Kentucky.  Albright then describes his tenure as president of Morehead State University and the reform he wanted to see within the university.  He states that he would want to be remembered for his work in enhancing the undergraduate programs of the institution, increasing stability, and raising morale.   He describes what he calls the “architectural hodge-podge” of the Morehead campus and compares it to UK and Northern Kentucky University.  Albright also describes his vision of the future for Morehead which he would like to see characterized by high quality undergraduate programs, and more experimentation with new technologies especially televised classes. He discusses his ideas for a graduate research center in Frankfort to study taxation and legislative issues.     

 

90OH232 A/F 403

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  July 30, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In this interview, A.D. Albright discusses university administrators’ attempts to move up the administrative ladder, the possibility of a PhD program at Western, and his hope for more distance learning in the future.  He describes the role of ethics in higher education and talks about an conflict of interest incident involving former UK President Otis Singletary.  He describes the process of hiring a new president for the University of Kentucky and the use of consultants to interview candidates.  He talks about his experiences with Fayette County, Kentucky government, particularly his role with the Urban County Council.  Albright also discusses ethics and accountability in government in general.

 

90OH233 A/F 404

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  August 7, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses his experience with Fayette County, Kentucky’s Urban County Council.  He describes the role of Mayor Scotty Baesler and the relationship between Baesler and UK’s Interim President Charles T. Wethington, Jr.  He also talks about Kentucky government in general and corruption in government.  He tells a story about attending a Democratic Executive Committee meeting and a Republican Executive Committee meeting the same day and questions about money that had been “lost” in Frankfort.  Albright describes educational initiatives in local government in Lexington and library cooperation within Kentucky and between Kentucky and other states.  He discusses what he wants to see in the future in regards to Fayette County government.  He provides his opinions of merged county and city governments.

 

90OH282 A/F 406

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  October 16, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

A.D. Albright discusses Kentucky State University and how he assisted KSU in a time of trouble.  Albright explains that Kentucky State, a historically black college, had begun to have more white students and faculty than African American students and faculty.  Albright also discusses views of the University of Kentucky in eastern Kentucky and states that UK has done little to solve the problems of eastern Kentucky including water and waste systems.  Albright also discusses graduate programs at Western Kentucky University and the establishment of a PhD program in education at WKU.  Albright explains that he believes that the whole system of teacher education should be revamped.

 

90OH322 A/F 422

A.D. ALBRIGHT

Date:  November 15, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

In this last interview, A.D. Albright discusses university restructuring.  He states that undergraduate education needs improvement, and he explains his views that a doctoral degree may not be truly needed for all professors teaching at the undergraduate level.  He examines the growing emphasis towards decentralization of higher education and believes that universities are becoming more politicized.  Albright also talks about presidential searches, particularly the search at the University of Kentucky after the resignation of David Roselle.  He explains the factors that go into the hiring of a university president.

 

84OH148 A/F 166

RUTH S. ALLEN

Date:  December 3, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

Ruth S. Allen started as an assistant home demonstration agent, and later became acting chairman of the Home Demonstration Program of the UK College of Agriculture.

Originally from Pulaski County, she received her B.S. degree in home economics from the University of Kentucky. She did graduate work at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Georgia, and finally at UK. She also received a teacher’s certificate in 1922 from Eastern State Teachers College in Richmond, Kentucky. She explains that three years of teaching experience, combined with her certificate, qualified her as a teacher for life, thus relieving the burden of expense to her parents for her future education.

Allen worked in Fayette County, Kentucky as a home demonstration agent from 1937 to 1943. She talks about her experiences in training youth and adults in home economics, and working with 4-H and adult clubs in cooperation with county extension agents to promote a unified program.  Allen recalls her experiences as a field agent in 4-H Club work during World War Two and immediately afterward (1943-1946), and the changes made during this time. She talks about the major change involved in extending the field area from county to district.  Allen worked as a district leader, but returned to work in Fayette County as a home demonstration agent from 1946 to 1956. In 1956 she became a supervisor of home agents.  Allen also discusses the challenges her students faced as new home economics graduates.

Allen was acting chairman of the Home Economics Education of Extension Services from 1965 until 1967. She reminisces about some experiences that defined her work and made it rewarding for her, as well as some of the problems and successes of working up the ladder in her field. She also discusses the idea of having a home economics supervisor as well as an agricultural supervisor to foster cooperation, as well as increasing the length of time for someone to be in the county. She recalls receiving the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the Home Economics Alumni Association.

 

85OH59 A/F 211

STEPHEN Q. ALLEN

Date:  March 14, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

Stephen Q. Allen was a participant in the College of Agriculture’s Cooperative Extension Center.  A native of Ellisburg (Casey County), Kentucky, Allen attended Houstonville High School, Campbellsville Junior College, and Eastern Kentucky State Teachers College.  He received his B.S. in Agriculture in 1948, and a M.S. in Agricultural Economics in 1953 from the University of Kentucky. Allen secured a position as an agricultural economics department specialist, and he discusses his duties in this job.

Allen mentions his various positions in UK’s College of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension Center. He was an assistant agricultural economist in research (1953-1955) and an agricultural economist (1955-1981).  Allen talks about being an extension specialist and mentions that Dr. Glenn Johnson was particularly helpful to him during this time.  Allen discusses at great length the Agricultural Economics Program and the Cooperative Extension Programs at UK.  He also talks about the various programs offered to veterans during and after World War Two that contributed to the growth and improvement of farms as well as the techniques used by farmers in Kentucky.  Allen recalls that these various programs integrated and facilitated communication between the various agents with different specialties as well as the local farmers and businesses.

He remembers expanding his participation with the news media at UK as well as in communities around the state.  He discusses extension publications and stresses the need to keep UK’s focus on Kentucky’s farms.  Since his retirement Allen has performed consulting work regarding the farm management curriculum at UK, and developed the state vocational agricultural department area of farm management.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Amos - Barlow.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

91OH408 A/F 459

CLIFFORD AMOS 

Date: December 5, 1991

Location:  Louisville, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions:  No Restrictions

Clifford Amos begins was born in Logan, West Virginia.  His family moved to Hayman (Letcher County), Kentucky where his father was a meat cutter and his mother worked in the commissary of the Micco Coal Company. They later lived in Wheelwright in Floyd County, and Pikeville in Pike County. Amos describes taking his eighth grade examination and graduating from Pikeville High School.   He then attended Pikeville Junior College and enrolled at UK in September of 1938.  He remembers that his parents wanted him to work rather than go to UK.

He talks about his work experiences, as well as his undergraduate experiences, saying he considered himself an average student. He majored in sociology and minored in social work. Amos became extremely ill once as a student and Frances Jewell McVey suggested he stay in the apartment above the garage at Maxwell Place with free lodging for ‘chores’ that rarely materialized.  Amos recalls experiences of campus life and his friendships with roommates at Maxwell Place; in particular Bob Pemberton and Bob Allen, as well as his friendship with Dottie Flynn. Amos graduated from UK in 1941.

Amos gives credit to Frances Jewell McVey for Dr. Frank McVey’s success. He reminisces at great length throughout this interview about Frances Jewell McVey. Amos recalls her gift for working with people, her ‘tremendous influence and impact’ on his life.  Amos later worked in sales for a telegraph company, and he relates his experience with setting up an office at Camp Breckenridge. He also recalls putting in Western Union clocks as a side job, and working in Nashville, Tennessee, where met his future wife, Fay.  Amos also served in the navy and is a Life Member of the UK Alumni Association.

 

84OH330 A/F 428

CLIFFORD AMYX

Date: ca. 1972

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles Talbert

Length:  35 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Poor

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No Restrictions

Clifford Amyx is a University of Kentucky alum and former art professor.  Amyx discusses the role of Dr. McVey in his career both as a student and as a professor.  He states that he was always more comfortable calling Dr. McVey by his formal title, but he describes socializing with the McVeys at Maxwell Place.   He talks about Dr. McVey’s leadership style including how he handled the evolution debate at UK.  Amyx describes his experiences as a student and as a member of the debate team.  He was involved with formation of the Liberal Club at UK based on Paul Porter’s League for Industrial Democracy.  Amyx and other members passed out pamphlets regarding the LID and opposition to military training. He recalls how Dr. McVey urged them to stop these activities, suggesting they think about what the consequences might be and the harm it might bring to UK. Amyx states that even the military kept an eye on their activities and came in uniform to campus.

Amyx returned to UK in 1941 to pursue a master’s degree after working at the California School of Fine Arts. He states that teaching was always his objective and mentions writing his thesis on art education. He also discusses Dr. McVey’s relationship with Ted Reynolds and Ann Catton Rich of the Art Institute at the University of Chicago.   Amyx talks about the Great Depression and how Dr. McVey kept people going during that period of time.  Amyx remembers several instructors, and states that the good ones were totally absorbed in their subject field. He discusses various aspects of art especially sculpture mentioning the difficulties of working in relief and the challenges of optical integrity.

 

85OH22 A/F 187  

PAUL APPEL

Date:  January 23, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  35 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions:  No

Paul Appel was born in Evansville, Indiana in 1925, and was raised on a grain and livestock farm. He was drafted into the service during World War Two and spent three years in the U.S. Navy in the South Pacific. After the war, he took advantage of the G.I. Bill and attended Purdue University, where he earned a B.S. degree in Agriculture, with a major in Animal Science and a minor in Agricultural Economics.

After college, Appel worked with Purdue’s Extension Service and served two years as assistant county agent in Terre Haute (Vigo County), Indiana. In 1952, he became a farm manager for Pfizer, where he states he helped to establish the world’s largest animal nutrition and health research facility. After ten years at Pfizer, he conducted plant research for Dow Chemical Company.  He recalls that at this time he was contacted by Dean Charles E. Barnhart of UK’s College of Agriculture regarding a position as superintendent at the western Kentucky substation near Princeton, Kentucky to which he was appointed in 1963. He recalls the history of the substation and Mr. S.J. Lowry, the first superintendent at Princeton. He talks about the changes in the focus of the substation with the purchase of Coldstream and Main Chance Farms in Lexington, Kentucky and mentions the work accomplished on limited finances.

In 1973, Appel became assistant to the dean of Personnel Records and College Alumni Records and Activities at the University of Kentucky’s main campus. He describes his job in charge of employment compliance and the organization of personnel records for UK, Extension Services, the U. S. Department of Agriculture, and the Civil Service Commission. New Affirmative Action rules and national regulations required this position. He also discusses his work with the Alumni Association and talks about his family.

 

94OH25 A/F 529  

PAUL APPEL

Date:  Spring, 1972

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  J. Allan Smith

Length:  35 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Poor

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions:  No

In this interview, Paul Appel talks about his work as the superintendent of the western Kentucky substation at Princeton, Kentucky and mentions his discussions regarding improvements to the farm house with Dean Charles E. Barnhart.  Prior to this, all of the resources went to the improvement of the farm and its structures rather than the living quarters. He recalls the previous superintendent, S.J. Lowry, and his family. Appel recalls growing up on a grain and livestock farm near Evansville, Indiana, serving in the navy during World War Two, and attending Purdue University where he graduated in 1950. 

Appel worked as an Extension Agent in Terre Haute (Vigo County), Indiana, then became the farm manager at the Charles Pfizer animal nutrition supplement research facility for nine years, where he first met Charles E. Barnhart. Appel was working for the Dow Chemical Company in the Northwest when he was contacted by Barnhart to come back to Kentucky and work at the substation in 1963. Appel talks about various research projects and how the limited budget affected programs and staffing. He discusses the important grass farming research done at this facility regarding the reconditioning of fields and storage of hay. He mentions various types of grasses being studied for livestock forage. Appel says the facility has 2,500 to 3,000 visitors each year from various schools, 4-H, and professional activities. He mentions that Harry Young from Christian County, Kentucky was the pioneer of no-till farming program in western Kentucky.

 

85OH60 A/F 212

GEORGE ARMSTRONG

Date:  March 15, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No

George Armstrong was born in 1923 in Knott County, Kentucky. He attended one-room schools in Knott County and Carr Creek High School.  He graduated from Berea College, and then pursued graduate work at the University of Kentucky and at the Georgia Institute of Technology where he studied special economic development. Armstrong says he became interested in cooperative extension work through his 4-H experiences in Knott County.

From 1955 until 1961, Armstrong worked as county agent in McCreary, Breathitt, and Bell Counties in Kentucky. He describes the work of the extension paraprofessionals in the county and the differences between the communities.  In 1961, he returned to the Robinson Substation in Breathitt County where he worked as both assistant project leader and industrial development specialist for the Eastern Kentucky Resource Development Project (EKRDP).  He remained in that capacity until 1971. He discusses how the EKRDP was started, funding through the Kellogg Foundation, and describes some of the EKRDP projects. He mentions Mrs. Shirley Griffith, a secretary for over twenty-eight years who was instrumental in helping to develop many successful programs at the Substation.

Armstrong was superintendent of the Robinson Substation, the area extension director for the Quicksand Area and the Wilderness Trail Area, and sometimes served all three positions simultaneously. Armstrong discusses the purpose and function of the County Extension Council, Area Council, and State Extension Council. He notes the invaluable support from the Kentucky Farm Bureau and the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture.  He also discusses the importance of being active in the community, talks about his family, and mentions his many awards.

 

85OH100 A/F 231

WILLIAM DAVIS ARMSTRONG

Date:  May 9, 1985

Location:  Princeton, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  50 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No             

Restrictions: No

William Davis “Army” Armstrong was born in Louise, Texas in 1905. He graduated from Wharton High School in 1924, and attended Texas A&M for one semester, left for the Naval Academy, and then went back to Texas A&M in 1926.  He graduated with a B. S. in Horticulture. He then went to the South Haven Experiment Station at Michigan State University in the summer of 1929 and attended graduate school. He then taught at the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture for one year. He was allowed to complete course work in lieu of a thesis, and received his Master’s degree from Michigan State in the spring of 1959.

Armstrong worked at the Georgia Experiment Station near Griffin, Georgia from 1932 until 1936. Through contacts at Texas A&M, he was appointed assistant horticulturist at Oklahoma Extension Services in 1936, and then associate extension horticulturist at Oklahoma A&M in 1937.  He recalls the work being stressful in Oklahoma after the Dustbowl era. Armstrong returned to the University of Kentucky’s Special Horticultural Program and served as horticulturist at the western Kentucky substation in Princeton, Kentucky from 1938 until 1962. He describes his work mulching strawberries and variety testing various crops. He mentions the peach tree pruning project at the Kentucky Cardinal Orchards in Henderson, Kentucky, and remembers working with the Kentucky State Fair. Between 1963 and 1965, Armstrong was an assistant professor at the Western Kentucky Experiment Station at Princeton, Kentucky. He discusses several projects including his work with pesticides and fungicides. From 1966 until 1974, he became the state extension specialist in horticulture at the Western Kentucky Substation, and states he was the first person allowed to supervise the entire state program from a location outside of Lexington. He also describes his family and his many awards.

 

01OH42 A/F 617

JOANN INGELS ATCHER

Date:  August 8, 2001

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  H. Jean Wheatley

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No

In this interview, Joann Ingels Atcher remembers her aunt, Margaret Ingels, who was the first female graduate of the University of Kentucky’s College of Engineering.  Margaret Ingels was born in Paris, Kentucky in 1892 and died in December of 1971.  She received her degree in 1916 from the University of Kentucky and was the second female engineering graduate in the United States.  Atcher recalls Ingels’ “affinity and affection”   for the University of Kentucky and states her aunt grew up with A.B. “Happy” Chandler, who became governor of Kentucky. She discusses Ingels’ views on women’s issues and family. Atcher talks about Ingel’s disciplined, professional approach to her personal activities, and explains that Ingels became a Donovan Scholar after retirement.  Atcher remembers that Ingels was also involved in community activities.

Atcher received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Kentucky in 1957, the same year Ingels received her Honorary Doctor of Laws Degree from UK. Ingels worked for the Carrier Engineering Corporation, Syracuse, New York, for many years. Atcher talks about Ingel’s work in the engineering field, particularly in the area of industrial heating and cooling systems and states that Ingels was a pioneer in her promotion of the domestic use of air conditioning.  Atcher flew to San Antonio, Texas in 1996 to accept the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Hall of Fame award (posthumously) on her aunt’s behalf.

 

84OH151 A/F 169

FAYE R. ATHERTON

Date:  December 4, 1984

Location:  Glasgow, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No

Faye R. Atherton, a former UK extension agent, was born in McLean County near Livermore, Kentucky in 1925. He recalls attending a one-room country school called Buck Creek. After high school, he entered the service for two years, and then attended the University of Kentucky for two semesters.  Atherton had to drop out to help his father on the farm, but he finished his B.S. degree at Western Kentucky University in 1949.

Between 1950 and 1954, Atherton taught war veterans farming techniques and developed an appreciation for farm records.  During the mid-1950s, he worked as an assistant county agent in Todd County, Kentucky, and then from 1956 until 1960, he was the county agent for Carlisle County, Kentucky. Atherton was appointed county agent in Barren County, Kentucky in February 1960. He describes the dynamics of the farm community and the income generated from the various agricultural practices in this county, particularly crops and dairy. He discusses how Cooperative Extension Services has become instrumental in improving standards of living and opportunities for education for farm families.

Atherton describes the Farm-City Expo, which grew out of the Farm-City and Rural Development Programs. He talks about the Barren County Extension Council and its role in the county. He describes the Area Extension Council, which covers ten counties around the Mammoth Cave area and discusses the role of the State Extension Council. Atherton points out various extension approaches utilized over time such as Farm-Home, Area, and County Programs. He states that farm organizations assist farmers by grouping together to be “heard” at the local, state, and national level and compliments the teamwork of the farm community. Atherton also discusses the supporting role of the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture to the farm community.

 

96OH70 A/F 555

WALTER J. BADO

Date:  April 15, 1996

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Wendy Evans

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: No

Fr. Walter J. Bado, SJ, was born in Chicago, Illinois in 1928.  The year of this interview, 1996, marks his fiftieth year as a member of the Jesuit order. He discusses the religious history of Chicago at great length.  He explains that both of his parents were immigrants to the United States from central Slovakia. His father was a meat cutter and a member of the Slovak Socialist Party. His mother was a homemaker and took care of himself and his sister. He states that, for his family, being Catholic was as much a way of life as a religion and emphasizes how his upbringing influenced his choice of vocation.

Bado attended the Slovak Sacred Heart parish school in Chicago through high school and won a scholarship to attend St. Ignatius, a Jesuit college prep school, also in Chicago. Bado decided to enter the Jesuit seminary in Milford, Ohio in 1946. He talks at great length about the history as well as the educational and spiritual life of the Jesuit order and describes the daily routine of the seminary. Bado received his A.B. from Milford and his M.A. in Philosophy from West Baden College in Ohio (part of Loyola University of Chicago). He taught at St. Ignatius High School in Cleveland, Ohio for three years while working on his doctoral thesis. He was then sent to Frankfurt, Germany between 1956 and 1960, for advanced theological studies and was ordained during this time. Bado speaks Slovak, English, French, and German, and reads Spanish, Italian, Greek, and Latin. In 1960, he went to Belgium for a final year of intensive study in spirituality and completed an additional course of special study at the University of Bonn in 1965.

Bado explains that between 1962 and 1965, the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council was changing the practice of Catholicism, and the Jesuit order started shifting to a more open lifestyle.  The West Baden facility was therefore moved to North Aurora, Ohio. Bado states that he taught Philosophy at this facility and then continued post-graduate studies in Germany and France between 1967 and 1971.  Bado also taught Philosophy at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio from 1971 until 1981. He then was assigned to the Catholic Newman Center on the University of Kentucky campus in 1981.

 

85OH180 A/F 266

WILLIAM H. BALDEN

Date:  June 6, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  40 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: No

William H. “Bill” Balden was born in Mercer County, near Harrodsburg, Kentucky. He graduated from Harrodsburg High School in 1939. Balden attended the University of Kentucky for two years prior to World War Two, then enlisted in the Naval Air Corps in 1942. He describes his experiences as a carrier pilot during his four years in the navy.  He returned to UK after the war, and earned a B.S. in Business Administration. He worked for five years for Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company as a manager in Louisville, Frankfort, Chattanooga, and Memphis. 

Balden came back to his father-in-law’s farm in 1953, where he began working with UK’s College of Agriculture and Cooperative Extension Services through Boyle County Agent John Brown. He decided to make the farm available for experimental variety programs, particularly sheep, certified seed and tobacco, which provided him the opportunity to meet many personnel from extension at the ground level. He was president of the Boyle County Farm Bureau, served for twenty-five years on Boyle County’s Extension Council, and was chairman of the Kentucky Farm Bureau Tobacco Committee. Balden mentions the politics of Kentucky agriculture, and explains that the tobacco program was the most controversial in terms of the political, social, and economic aspects, especially the tobacco baling issue. Balden emphasizes that farmers need people outside of Extension to work for them and gives credit to governors Louie B. Nunn and Wendell H. Ford for working together to get the Seed Stock Building at Spindletop Farm. He discusses the benefits to farmers as a result of the return to the county agent system from the area system, and the importance of regular educational meetings for farmers in each county.

Balden served in the state Farm Bureau as chairman of various committees and as an elected official. He discusses the work of the Farm Bureau committees and their methods of developing policies at the county level as well as their input at state and national level. Balden notes he was later voted out as director over the tobacco baling issue, but became a member of the Burley Farmers Advisory Council. He also talks about his family and his awards.

 

84OH71 A/F 219

HUBERT EUGENE BALL

Date:  March 25, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour 20 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: No

Hubert Eugene “Gene” Ball, a former UK extension agent, was born in 1928. His father was a schoolteacher in Kentucky during the Depression but moved north to Columbus, Ohio with the family to find work. The family moved back to Lawrence County, Kentucky to a 160-acre farm, where he remembers his father as a “progressive farmer.” Ball graduated from Blaine High School in 1946, and recalls that the 4-H program influenced his decision to begin a career in agriculture.  Ball served in the navy, and then enrolled in Morehead State Teacher’s College in 1948.  He came to the University of Kentucky in 1950, where he earned a B.S. degree in Agriculture in 1952 and his Master’s degree in Agricultural Sciences in 1961. Ball joined the university extension program in 1953.

Ball worked as an assistant county agent in Pike County between 1953 and 1957 and as county and agricultural agent in Martin County from 1957 until 1965. He describes his responsibilities and the difficulties of his work in these economically depressed areas. He mentions programs that stimulated the economy of these eastern Kentucky counties such as the Kentucky Rural Development Extension Program and the Area Development Program, which eventually became the Community Action Program.  In 1965, Ball became a county agent in Floyd County.  In 1970, he took a position as an area extension specialist in community development through which, he acted as coordinator for the Northeast Kentucky Rural Community Development Services Agency.  Ball served as area extension director for Northern Kentucky in 1979 and for the Wilderness Trail area in 1980. He explains that he moved back to Floyd County in 1981 to be the county agent.

 

85OH154 A/F 260

HARMON H. BARLOW

Date:  June 24, 1985

Location:  Glasgow, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  50 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No                        

Restrictions: No

Harmon H. Barlow, Jr. was born in Barren County, Kentucky in 1913. He graduated from high school at the beginning of the Depression, but was unable to attend college due to his father’s ill health. He went to work on the family farm and became involved in the 4-H program when it was introduced to the county in 1929. Barlow remembers how participation in 4-H activities influenced him, especially the opportunity to travel. He talks about his 205 acre farm which he now runs in partnership with his son. Barlow explains that they raise crops and have a herd of 160 registered Jersey cows. Barlow discusses how the county and state Extension Services staff has helped the farmers to implement techniques to improve production and their income. He also talks briefly about the genetics and breeding of cattle.

Barlow joined the Southeastern United States Dairy Industry Association in 1945 and discusses early efforts to promote dairy products. He recalls his children’s involvement in dairying and their involvement in 4-H showing dairy cattle.  Barlow was president of the American Dairy Association and was a 4-H leader for over thirty years. He also served on the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture Dairy Advisory Committee. He talks about the Utopia Club, a program which was started in Kentucky in the 1930s for young people to continue in 4-H after they had reached the age limit. He discusses hybrid and no-tillage corn as well as the technique of double-cropping.  He describes his work with the state Extension Council in Lexington, Kentucky. Barlow also talks about his wife, Lucille Parrish, and her involvement in the community.

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