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Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: C: UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Clary - Cochran

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, faculty and alumni.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Clary - Cochran.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

92OH166 A/F 504

MARK CLARY

Date: April, 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer: Kristie Terry

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Poor

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Mark Clary, an assistant professor of architecture at the University of Kentucky, taught design primarily. He was born in 1954 in Russellville, Kentucky, and recalls that education was very important in his family.  Clary states that he never had an interest in education in his youth due to a lack of enthusiasm and good teachers, and this created conflict with his father.  Later, Clary explains that he became inspired to become the teacher he never had.  Clary discusses various teachers and mentors that he had while a student at the University of Kentucky.

Clary started his college career at the University of Louisville.  He played tennis but he was ruled ineligible by the NCAA. He then dropped out and started working at a tennis club in Louisville.  While working at the club, Clary became good friends with architect Bill Martin.  Clary states that Martin gave him a job which became his first introduction to the field of architecture. Clary then went to Jefferson Community College for a semester before he was accepted at UK. Clary obtained his architecture degree from UK and practiced freelance. Then, Cornell offered Clary a teaching assistantship, and he spent two years there gaining experience.

Clary discusses his career choice as well as various jobs he had before coming to UK. He recalls his work as an instructor for Cornell’s summer program for high school students. After he left UK, Clary was a substitute teacher in Louisville for the high school system. Clary also describes his views on education.

 

92OH167 A/F 505

MARK CLARY

Date:  April, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Kristie Terry

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Poor

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

At the time of this interview, Mark Clary was an assistant professor in the College of Architecture at the University of Kentucky. In this interview, Mark Clary describes a “typical” day at work. He discusses how the use of the senses helps us to learn, and how the contact we have with the world is being reorganized because of the “electronic paradigm.”  Clary explains that he relies on the use of autobiography and allegory in his teaching.  He sees this approach as a much more empowering model for teaching. Clary feels his work in teaching and research as interconnected, and talks about the role of politics in education. He discusses the challenge of achieving a balance between home and work.  He wants to see more open discussion about this in the teaching environment, and says he wished teachers would bring the “real world” into the classroom more often.

Clary describes his hopes that his work resonates with people so that real growth takes place.  He talks about the nature of his research work in the area of electronic phenomena, and its possibilities. Clary states that he wants to make an architectural drawing, model, or building that would be the equivalent of a videomatic script, and emphasizes that this is central to his research.  Clary talks about finding intersections or threads that run through people’s external and personal lives, and he describes the term “video-literate” in terms of television and generations becoming more naturalized to this medium. Clary wants to see evocative buildings created that move people deeply today like a Gothic cathedral did in the past. He also discusses his study of suburban architecture.

 

90OH342 A/F 435

CLYDE CLEM 

Date: March 20, 1974

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles D. Talbert

Length: 20 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Clyde Richard “C. R.” Clem was the first barber to have a shop at the University of Kentucky’s Student Union Building, and worked there between 1938 and 1940. Clem also owned his own business, the State Barber Shop, on Limestone Street near campus.  He talks about UK President, Frank L. McVey, who was a regular customer at the barber shop on campus. He recalls McVey talked with him about the barber shop when he first arrived, since there was initially some resistance to the barber shop on campus. Clem remembers that after a few months it was no longer a problem.  Clem states that he was impressed with the job that McVey did with the university during the Great Depression. He recalls the Student Union was supposed to be self-supporting, and then the state took it over after several years. He talks about Jimmy Shropshire, who was the director of the Student Union Building.

Clem worked in his shop on Limestone Street until 1945. Clem recalls the price of a haircut then was $.35, although the price dropped during the 1930s. He talks about paying for meals at the boarding houses close by, and remembers that he would loan money to students. He claims to have lost only $17.00 in eight years. He recalls the students would sometimes collect his money for him.

 

 85OH12 A/F 181

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  January 15, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

Former University of Kentucky professor, Lewis W. Cochran, was born in 1915 in Perryville, Kentucky.  His parents were teachers, but his father eventually went into several different businesses including managing a country store.  Cochran recalls growing up near Hustonville, Kentucky.  He describes hog drives and having John Y. Brown, Sr. as their contract mail carrier.  Cochran remembers people gathering at his father’s old country store to play checkers or rook and to chew tobacco.  He describes the impact of the Great Depression on his father’s country store where so many of the customers bought their groceries on credit.  One night his father opened the stove door and threw the books in.  Shortly thereafter, the family moved to a farm adjacent to his grandfather’s farm.

Cochran lived with his grandmother and attended high school in Perryville until the family moved to the farm which was close enough to Hustonville that Cochran could drive himself and his brothers to school.  He talks about the limited offerings, but excellent teachers at both high schools.  By chance, Cochran was offered a scholarship or what he calls a “workship” from Morehead State Teacher’s College (now Morehead State University).   Cochran describes his experiences at Morehead, recalling his first work assignment as a cook in the college cafeteria.  His second position was in the math and physics department.  Cochran majored in mathematics and he recalls the faculty at Morehead mentioning Dr. Payne and Dr. Black, a mathematics professor. Dr. Black had a large impact on Cochran’s life and it was through a recommendation from Dr. Black that Cochran was able to attend graduate school at the University of Kentucky.

Cochran describes the UK campus at the time that he was working toward his Master’s degree in Physics.  He describes other graduate students and professors.  He mentions Dr. Thomas Marshall Hahn, Dr. Louis Arthur Pardue, and Dr. Otto G. Koppius.  He discusses his impressions of UK President Frank L. McVey as the key person responsible for transforming UK from an A&M school to a state university.  Cochran describes how Mrs. Frances Jewell McVey helped to set the cultural tone for the university and remembers her weekly teas.  He describes how the university was flooded with students from New York and New Jersey who were attracted to UK and other southern universities by the cheaper tuition.  He discusses some dangerous areas on campus near the present-day student center and Memorial Coliseum.  Cochran finished his master’s degree in January of 1939 and then taught in the spring and summer of that year at Morehead. 

 

85OH24 A/F 189

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  January 29, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this second session, Lewis W. Cochran discusses the time he spent working on his Ph.D. and his experiences in the army during World War II.  After finishing his Master’s degree at the University of Kentucky, Cochran rotated between working on his PhD and his dissertation on nuclear accelerators and teaching at Morehead State Teacher’s College.  He then secured a position teaching at Cumberland College in 1941, where he taught math and physics, was the dean of men, and the assistant athletic director.  He also discusses the feelings of himself and his new bride towards the townspeople. 

After Pearl Harbor, Cochran was asked to take part in the formation of a Signal Corps in Lexington.  He describes the decision to start some signal schools to teach radar repair and how he was sent to Fort Monmouth, New Jersey to study radar systems.  Within a short period of time, Cochran’s draft number came up and he knew that he would be unable to stay a civilian member of the Signal Corps for long.  Some of the officers with the Signal Corps helped him to get a direct commission as a 2nd lieutenant in 1942 and he went back to Fort Monmouth, New Jersey for military training.   After completing training, he received orders to go to Camp Murphy in Florida where he taught and took classes.  He describes operating a British-made radar set and watching for German submarine activity. 

Cochran was then ordered back to Lexington to the Signal School.  He explains how the army moved the school to Baltimore without missing a beat.  Cochran was in Baltimore for two years.  His title was Chief of the Training Division and Chief of the Maintenance Division.  Cochran received his first orders overseas two days after his first child was born.  He describes the experience of going to the Philippines.  He soon received orders go to the Sixth Army in Japan.  He went to Kyoto to the Sixth Army Headquarters, but was then sent to the 41st Infantry Division.  He recalls seeing refugees and bombed out cities.  He remembers getting the opportunity to spend a week sightseeing in Hiroshima, and the struggles of being in Japan at that time. 

Cochran states that his job was to look over any signal equipment found and decide what to do with it.  He also recalls investigating radio stations that were still operating and describes the equivalence of the American and Japanese technology. Cochran was then sent back to Manila, and he describes the conditions working with the Filipino militia, who he states were stealing from the U.S. Army.  He recalls going to a war crimes trial for a Japanese general.

 

85OH29 A/F 193

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  February 5, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes  

Audio Conditions:  Good  

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

Former University of Kentucky professor, Lewis W. Cochran, describes his early career.  He arrived back from the Philippines in April of 1946 and began teaching at Morehead State Teacher’s College (now Morehead State University) in the summer of 1946.  He was offered a position UK and describes how the physics department had gone through several transitions throughout the war.  He remembers Karl Lange, a German professor, who began teaching at UK at this time and eventually headed the Wenner-Gren Laboratory.  Cochran discusses the influx of students after World War II and his own attempts to finish his PhD.

Cochran describes attempting to get the money to buy an accelerator tube for the physics department.  He states that the university was not always good at making appropriate use of state funding.  Cochran also talks about differences between the engineering and the physics departments, and discusses UK President Herman Donovan.  He recalls details about the integration of the university and racial attitudes while he was growing up.  He remembers problems with integration at Morehead.  He also talks about the prestige of being appointed to the UK Board of Trustees and the relationship between the University and the gubernatorial administrations of Earle Clements and Lawrence W. Wetherby. 

Cochran describes living in Shawneetown for six years with his family.  He talks about the primitive conditions but states that they were grateful for anything that they could get at the time.  Cochran reminisces about Adolph Rupp and states that there is so much pride in UK basketball because it was one thing that Kentucky excelled at.  He describes seeing Adolph Rupp and John Y. Brown, Sr. at the Wildcat Restaurant eating breakfast.  He recalls how the hiring of Paul “Bear” Bryant as football coach brought in a new era for UK football.  Cochran also talks about building projects on campus and a “restlessness” that was developing in the early 1950s over the lack of scholarly projects going on at the university.

 

85OH36 A/F 196

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  February 12, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes    

Audio Conditions:  Good   

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. Cochran talks about events on the University of Kentucky campus after World War II.  He states that physics faculty began work on redeveloping physics research at UK, and remembers scientists who came from Oak Ridge, Tennessee to use UK’s accelerator for their work on a nuclear-powered airplane.  Cochran recalls some hazardous activities that he participated in without knowing the dangers.  He describes his research on fast neurons and the funding for a nuclear accelerator that was bought in 1969 or 1970.  He discusses attempts to start a nuclear engineering program and the program’s ultimate failure.

Cochran describes the lack of research on UK’s campus at the time, but does note the research of historian Thomas D. Clark, Grant C. Knight of the English department, and William S. Webb and William D. Funkhouser in Archeology.  Cochran states that good graduate students were often encouraged to attend stronger research universities to complete their graduate work.   Cochran discusses the nuclear industry in general and its safety record.  He remembers early accidents that he heard about through his friends at Oak Ridge.  He states that nuclear energy can be safe if it is produced and used correctly. 

Cochran completed his Ph.D. in 1952 and was offered a faculty position at Auburn, and a research position at MIT.  Yet he decided to stay at UK because he enjoyed teaching and his family and friends were close.  He discusses the transition to becoming a new professor and being appointed to the board of directors of the UK Research Foundation.  Cochran went to Oak Ridge in 1949 to work on neuron activation studies and he describes his research to capture a cross section of gold and measuring the polarization of a cross section of a neuron. 

Cochran describes his relationships with other UK professors and explains the role of The Research Club.  In 1956, he became acting head of the physics department and discusses how that came about. Cochran also describes the design and the construction of the new Chemistry-Physics Building in the early 1960s.  He discusses how the design largely follows that of the 4500 Building at Oak Ridge.

 

85OH44 A/F 202

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  February 19, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft 

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. Cochran, former University of Kentucky professor of Physics, describes attempts to get new equipment like a Van de Graaff particle accelerator.  He talks about Maury Rose, a nuclear theorist, who Cochran wanted to hire, and recalls showing Kentucky sites to the Atomic Energy Commission who were looking for a location to build a lab.  Cochran took a leave of absence for fifteen months in 1959 and 1960 to work on a chapter for a book sponsored by the National Research Council.  He describes his other research projects including developing a technique for measuring the diffusion and mobility of electrons in gases.    

Cochran discusses important factors in recruiting new faculty and states that the key thing is to have an atmosphere of scholarship.  Cochran discusses the appointment of Frank Dickey to the presidency of the University of Kentucky and events of his administration including the development of the medical center.  He talks about attempts to oust Frank Peterson, Comptroller and Vice President of Business Affairs for the university, and the resignation of Frank Dickey in 1962.  Cochran recalls the faculty committee that was formed to set up the search process for a new president which included Thomas D. Clark, Aubrey Brown, and himself.  He states that there was a feeling that it was time for a shakeup at the university.  Cochran talks about the involvement of political figures, particularly A.B. “Happy” Chandler, and recalls an incident when a faculty member claimed that she was denied a salary increase due to political comments that she made.

 

85OH47 A/F 204

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  February 26, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the controversy surrounding Frank Peterson, the selection of John Oswald as university president, and changes in the university structure in the early 1960s.  Frank Peterson was Comptroller and Vice President for Business Affairs at the university.  Cochran explains that Peterson was an outstanding business manager, who had become involved in some ethically questionable business practices. 

Cochran recalls that a committee was set up to investigate the charges against Peterson.  He explains that Clifford Smith, a Frankfort lawyer, was on the committee and wanted to get rid of Peterson for political reasons.  Smith began to raise questions about Peterson’s involvement in the university’s purchases of land around the campus area.  He explains that Smith put forward the motion to suspend Peterson and that it passed on a close vote.  However, the UK Board of Trustees did not accept the committee’s decision.  They named a new committee and decided that the committee would meet after charges had been developed.  The major charge against Peterson regarded his involvement with a vending machine company that had a contract with the university.  Peterson admitted an error in judgment and was suspended for over a year at which time he would reach the normal retirement age. 

The Peterson issue came at the same time as Dickey’s resignation.  Cochran remembers that the university faculty knew that Peterson’s influence needed to be modified in order to attract a decent new president.  He recalls that the meeting over the retirement benefits that Peterson would receive was one of the worst meetings of his career.  The final decision was to award Peterson the standard percentage of an associate professor’s salary.  He talks about the decision to name the new service building after Peterson.

Cochran also discusses the controversy surrounding Abby Marlatt, head of the Home Economics Department, who became involved in the push for desegregation, and was subsequently demoted.  Cochran then describes the search for a new university president in 1963.  He explains that the proposal of rotating departmental chairs and deans was already on the table before Oswald arrived, although Oswald did put these changes in the university’s organization in motion.  In January of 1963, Cochran was appointed associate dean of the Graduate School, and he recalls working the A.B. Kirwan, the dean of the Graduate School.

 

85OH54 A/F 208

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date:  March 5, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  First Draft 

Restrictions: None

Former University of Kentucky professor and administrator Lewis W. Cochran discusses the role that John Oswald played as president of the University of Kentucky.  When Oswald became president, Cochran was the associate dean of the Graduate School, a member of the Faculty Council, and a Faculty Trustee.  Cochran later became provost of the Lexington campus. He describes the elimination of the ROTC as a mandatory requirement in 1964, and states that it was for the best since there were a lot of reluctant people in ROTC at the time.

He describes other changes during Oswald’s administration, especially the changes in promotion and tenure and the reorganization of departments on campus.  Cochran states that Oswald played a key role in the further development of graduate programs and in increasing budgets.  Cochran mentions Glenwood Creech, who he feels was never completely in tune with Oswald, and A.D. Albright, who he feels helped people think through their actions more cautiously.  He describes working with A.D. “Ab” Kirwan, who was dean of the Graduate School at the time.

Cochran discusses the evaluation of department heads in detail.  He describes how people like Thomas D. Clark were hurt by the evaluations when their departments wanted a change.  He mentions problems with Dean Lyman Ginger of the College of Education and the Dean William Seay of the College of Agriculture. Cochran explains that although much of the push for change was internal, problems were blamed on President Oswald. 

Cochran talks about the role of Governor Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt towards the advancement of the university due to his generous funding of UK.  Cochran discusses his personal relationship with John Oswald, which he recalls as pleasant.  He describes building projects on campus during Oswald’s administration, and changes in undergraduate education.  Cochran explains how the general studies component was developed and administered.

 

85OH72 A/F 220

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: March 28, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran talks about the development of a new academic plan during President Herman L. Donovan’s tenure at the University of Kentucky.  He recalls that implementation of the plan actually occurred during President John W. Oswald’s administration. Cochran states that he was aware of potential opposition to the changes.  He recalls he met with the faculty of each college at least once to discuss the recommendations of the new plan.  Cochran describes the Faculty Senate meeting during which he made 64 motions for the new curriculum, all of which passed. The biggest change to the curriculum was the implementation of required general courses for the baccalaureate degree.

Cochran remembers the goal was to develop a university with a stronger national reputation.  He describes how Oswald cultivated the support of people in leadership positions around the state, and informed them of the university’s objectives. He discusses the movement during the 1960s to merge the University of Louisville with UK.  He recalls that there was also discussion about making Northern Kentucky University a part of the UK system.  Cochran recalls interest in a consortium between UK and the University of Cincinnati. He remembers the Committee of Fifteen, which was assembled to plan the UK Centennial Celebration. He talks briefly about the integration of black students as well as black faculty, and recalls most of the difficulties they experienced were off campus in racially segregated Lexington.  Cochran discusses at length the curriculum at the undergraduate and graduate levels, and the change to a more selective admissions policy. He talks about student leadership during the 1970s, and the unrest on campus during this period.

 

85OH78 A/F 224

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: April 9, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses President John T. Oswald’s administration at the University of Kentucky. In 1966, Governor Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt cut $3.67 million from the university’s budget. Cochran remembers quite a few internal changes in faculty and staff during this time.  He talks about the criticism of Oswald from the Lexington community. Cochran notes that Oswald was not an “athletics enthusiast,” had arrived with an image of “political liberalism,” and knew that he would only be president for five or six years. He recalls professional and personal reasons that prevented Oswald from becoming a part of the community. By this time, Louie B. Nunn was running for governor and had publicly voiced his opposition to Oswald. Cochran believed that Nunn simply did not like Oswald. He notes that there was concern developing over whether or not the level of university support would be maintained in the new administration.

Cochran remembers when Albert D. Kirwan was appointed as acting president in 1968 after Oswald’s resignation. He states that Kirwan’s appointment helped restore some of Nunn’s good will toward the UK. Cochran discusses at length his working relationship with Kirwan during this interim period. Cochran was dean of the Graduate School and vice-president for research between 1967 and 1970. Cochran discusses UK’s Board of Trustees, and recalls that the practice of Kentucky’s governor acting as UK’s Chairman of the Board stopped with Governor Wendell H. Ford’s administration. Cochran talks at length about the selection and appointment of Otis A. Singletary as U.K.’s next president. Cochran remembers the national surge of interest for equal educational opportunities for ethnic groups as well as women, and the competition for qualified faculty and students who fit those criteria.

 

85OH79 A/F 225

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: April 16, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran continues his discussion of the changes in structure and appointments implemented at the University of Kentucky during President John T. Oswald’s administration. He talks about the student unrest during the late 1960s, the situation with students’ rights, and emphasizes that sometimes the benefits of student participation at any level outweighs the value of the results. Cochran recalls the “more open, aggressive student unrest” came to UK a little later than the rest of the country.  He remembers Oswald’s weekly coffee hours at the Student Center so that he could be available to students. He talks about the drug situation on campus, particularly when several students were suspended without trial after a drug raid.

Cochran recalls the May, 1970 campus demonstrations when Governor Louie B. Nunn called out the Kentucky National Guard.  He states that the campus police handled themselves well. Cochran ranks President Otis A. Singletary’s handling of that situation as one of best acts during his presidency. He mentions the board of trustees meeting held during the protests, during which A. B. “Happy” Chandler punched a student.

Cochran remembers that by 1973 or 1974, the mood of the student body changed. He states that most students eventually became “disenchanted” and withdrew once they realized they could not have the impact that they expected.  Cochran also discusses the Kentucky Kernel, the student newspaper, mentioning that it was once was managed by the School of Journalism as a training ground for journalism students. He recalls that it was considered too liberal, and feels it became a better newspaper when it became independent.

 

85OH105 A/F 234

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: May 28, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview session, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran talks about Dr. Otis A. Singletary’s administration. He emphasizes Singletary’s good credentials and his nationwide recognition. He discusses the reorganization of the office of executive vice-president by breaking up the authority and influence into several vice-presidencies. Cochran strongly recommended to Singletary that the president retain authority over the budget. Cochran talks about this issue in relation to the development of the medical center and the community college system. Cochran mentions he was vice-president for research while also dean of the Graduate School, and that he became vice-president of academic affairs under the new reorganization. He describes the delegation of authority as well as the process and the responsibilities of vice-presidents in regard to budget allocations.

Cochran discusses the development of the medical center and the organization of its staff.  He talks about the UK and University of Louisville merger idea that had been discussed in the early 1960s.  He states that this merger might have worked had it been implemented before the medical center was developed. Cochran explains that the state cannot provide funding for two major research universities.  He notes that Northern Kentucky University was also considered in this merger proposal and mentions the Chase Law School at NKU is written into the Kentucky Statutes and cannot be abolished without an act of the Kentucky General Assembly. Cochran talks about the national movement to change teachers and state colleges into universities. He describes the “publish or perish” policy of the university career model. He discusses his working relationship with the deans and how it helped his ability to manage resources. He talks about faculty development and tenure, and how it affects an academic career. Cochran describes Singletary’s conservative money management goal.

 

85OH114 A/F 237

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: June 4, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran begins this interview by discussing some of the early appointments to the Otis A. Singletary administration at the University of Kentucky. He recalls how these appointments related to the reorganization plan. He describes individuals who were chosen, including John Stevenson, George Denmark, Larry Forgy, and Charles T. Wethington. He talks at length about the responsibilities of these various appointments as well as their strengths and weaknesses. Cochran discusses his own administrative style and the accreditation process. He describes the community college system and his concerns regarding maintenance of “proper academic programs and proper standards.”  Cochran emphasizes that all community colleges are not nearly as standardized as they are in Kentucky. He discusses the placement of the community colleges around the state, and some of the problems regarding accessibility. He mentions the belief that selective admissions would funnel the good students from the community colleges to UK.

Cochran describes taking UK Board of Trustees meetings to the community college campuses, and recalls the first one was in Henderson, Kentucky around 1965. Cochran explains that Singletary continued to develop a working relationship with the board of trustees, and mentions some of the 1969-1970 board members, including J. Robert Miller, Wendell Butler, Governor Louie B. Nunn, former Governor A. B. “Happy” Chandler, Floyd Wright, and George Griffin. He notes that Singletary and Oswald had similar styles in working with the board of trustees and describes a few of their methods, such as pre-board briefings and informal information sessions prior to the formal meeting. He also talks about the 1971-1972 board and mentions board members Eugene Goss, Steve Bright, and Albert Clay.

 

85OH124 A/F 241

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: June 13, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran begins this interview by discussing the movement towards a Bachelor of General Studies degree at the University of Kentucky. He credits Herb Drennon, assistant dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, with preserving the academic integrity of this program.  Cochran recalls his greatest disappointment was the absence of the best faculty members on the University Senate and Senate Council. He talks about the period between 1980 and 1981, when cut-backs and retrenchment took place. Cochran also recalls the Penn Central investment controversy in the early 1970s, when UK joined a class action lawsuit against the Goldman-Sachs brokerage house. He remembers that the university operated in good faith during that period, and he discusses long term investment strategy.

Cochran talks about UK’s law school and the division of the law faculty over the choice of a new dean in 1971.  He remembers George Hardy was finally appointed.  Cochran notes that the College of Law is the most autonomous college on campus and does not go through the regular committee evaluations. He discusses the overall curriculum of the law school and the development of a continuing education program.

Cochran remembers when Governor Wendell H. Ford was chairman of the board of trustees in 1972, and the concern that it was becoming a partisan group. He notes that this factor did not affect decisions made by the board since it was rarely evenly divided. He mentions the “Sunshine Law” and open board meetings.  He discusses appointments of Zirl A. Palmer, the first African American trustee, Garvis Kincaid, and Jacob Graves in August of 1972. He mentions other board members who served in the mid-1970s, including John Crockett, Frank Ramsey, Jr., and Homer Wendell Ramsey. He also talks about UK’s 3-2 program in engineering in collaboration with Kentucky State University, and the search for more black students to attend the graduate schools.

 

85OH162 A/F 263

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: July 2, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Former UK professor and administrator Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran talks about UK President Otis A. Singletary’s administration. He recalls the early 1970s was a period of increased inflation and that Singletary’s long-term management approach took hold after the turmoil of student unrest on campus. Cochran discusses at length the issue of academic leadership. He remembers that Singletary felt that academic initiative should come directly from the faculty.   Cochran also talks about constructive change on campus and the difficulties associated with it. He recalls the revisions made in degree requirements for the undergraduate students, and mentions the efforts to improve the overall quality of the institution.  Cochran talks about his visits to various departments, his interest in their projects, and states that he feels this approach had a positive effect.  Yet he describes the loss of top faculty members due to a perceived lack of academic support and personality conflicts.

Cochran discusses the opening a veterinary school at Murray State University in the mid-1970s. Cochran mentions how the needs of the livestock industry were met by the veterinary science department in UK’s College of Agriculture, through its exchange programs with Auburn and Ohio State Universities, its work with the Grayson Research foundation, and the state’s Livestock Disease and Diagnostic Laboratories.  He mentions funding issues and gifts, including that of Hilary Boone.

Cochran discusses various other issues on UK’s campus in the 1970s.  He mentions the crisis in the College of Communications in 1975 when they lost their accreditation. He describes the difficulty of defining the role of UK’s on-campus FM radio station. He talks about the mistakes he made with the Department of Home Economics when he moved it from the College of Agriculture to the College of Education. Cochran discusses at length the affect of location upon state universities, and points to Lexington and Louisville, Kentucky as examples.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Cochran (Cont'd).

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

85OH163 A/F 264

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: July 9, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran begins this interview by discussing the plans and goals for the Institute for Mines and Minerals (IMMR) at the University of Kentucky in 1974.  Cochran explains that during Governor Wendell H. Ford’s administration, concern over air pollution was growing, and Ford became interested in research on coal gasification.  Cochran talks about the financing package for this project, the decision to place the building at Spindletop Farm, and faculty participation at this off-campus site. He describes the relationship between the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and UK’s College of Agriculture.  He notes that UK’s relationship with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is actually more meaningful than its relationship with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Cochran also discusses funding and appointments for the agricultural Experiment Station and the Cooperative Extension Service.

Cochran mentions that the university has operated many state programs over the years, and emphasizes that this is the mission of a state land grant university. He explains that the philosophical base of a land grant university is dedication to educational opportunity, particularly for low income people.  Cochran also credits Dr. Frank L. McVey for taking the steps to convert UK into a state university, and notes that a state is fortunate if it has a major government-supported institution.

Cochran discusses the role of the Council on Higher Education, which he describes as a type of central governing board for the universities, largely ensuring that the missions of the higher-learning institutions do not overlap. He mentions individuals that have served on the Council, including A.D. Albright, and discusses problems with this system.  He recalls the most recent changes to the mission statement of Kentucky State University in 1977 or 1978. Cochran points out that clarification is needed for the urban and rural educational and service responsibilities of the higher education institutions of Kentucky.  He also compares the growth of Louisville, Kentucky, Cincinnati, Ohio, and Lexington, Kentucky.

 

85OH177 A/F 265 LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN 

Date: July 23, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran talks about the Council on Higher Education during Governor Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt’s administration. He that mentions Edward F. Prichard was likely the most influential member to ever serve on the council.  Cochran states that Prichard “was a strong believer in a basic liberal arts education, and a strong proponent of high academic standards.”  Cochran also discusses the Kentucky public school system and notes that Kentucky’s public schools are not being fully realized.  He mentions the regional differences in Kentucky between the Purchase, Bluegrass, eastern Kentucky mountains, and Louisville areas.

Cochran discusses change at the University of Kentucky.  He recalls former University of Kentucky President Herman L. Donovan’s statement, “You can’t have a great state without a great state university.”  He mentions the early efforts of the Frank L. McVey to transform UK from an A&M university to a state university.  Cochran compares this effort to that of former President John W. Oswald to achieve a higher level of academic excellence.  Cochran also talks about the problems of formula funding.

Cochran briefly discusses the development of the Appalachian Studies Program and the Appalachian Center, and John Stevenson’s involvement in the program.  He mentions how UK’s attitude towards the Appalachian region has changed. He describes President Otis A. Singletary’s character, his interest in government work and the political system, and the various opportunities presented to him as he neared retirement from UK. Cochran emphasizes the overall improvement in university management during Singletary’s tenure. Cochran discusses the 1977-1978 period, during which many were frustrated with the level of academic support and felt they were losing resources. He recalls making the effort to study merit evaluations each year, to discuss these with the dean of each college, and to talk with faculty and staff about their work. He discusses the tenure processes that were implemented in 1964 and 1965, and describes the evaluation procedure, and the role of publishing in gaining tenure.

 

85OH183 A/F 268

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: July 29, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran is the retired former dean of the Graduate School and vice-president of the University of Kentucky. He was born in 1915 at his grandfather home, near the Mercer County-Boyle County line in Kentucky.  He received his B.S. degree from what is now Morehead State University in 1936, his M.S. in Physics from UK in 1939, and his Ph.D. in Physics from UK in 1952. He first became aware of UK’s Cooperative Extension Service when he visited the local farmers, and when he took vocational educational training at Perryville High School.

Cochran taught in the Department of Physics from 1946-1958 when it was located in Pence Hall, and was acting head until 1963. Cochran remembers there was not much research work but that it was a good teaching department. He mentions Professor William S. Webb. Cochran was made the acting head when several faculty members went overseas with the first Indonesian project. He remembers the fight to keep the replacements when the other faculty members returned. He recalls obtaining a nuclear accelerator with the new physics building, and talks about meeting most of the people from the College of Agriculture through research. Cochran is considered a “principal architect” of the new academic plan, and he recalls the College of Agriculture was the most interested and involved of all the colleges in this process.

Cochran describes the Appalachian Educational Satellite Program. He discusses his most satisfying and dissatisfying experiences, and his participation in extension activities. Cochran expresses his concerns for the small farmer, the importance of the land grant mission, and talks at length about the philosophical nature of the University of Kentucky. He mentions visiting a different building every day to learn what work was being done, and that it helped him to make better financial decisions. Cochran talks at length about his family and their farm operations near Hustonville, Kentucky. He mentions his professional memberships, and discusses the Kentucky Research Foundation and the Main Chance Farm controversy. He describes the work of the Graduate and Senate Councils. He talks about his involvement with the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), and discusses some of his military experiences during World War II. Cochran humbly states that he is proud to be a native Kentuckian, and due to his modest upbringing, he never expected to attend the university, much less serve in the administration.

 

85OH184 A/F 269 

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: July 30, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the growing need to expand the University of Kentucky’s Medical Center in the late 1970s while he was vice-president of academic affairs. Cochran was not directly involved with this project, but recalls that Dr. Peter Bosomworth, who was the Chancellor of the medical center during this time, was “one of the very best academic administrators he knew.”  Cochran mentions Drs. William Willard and Joseph Hamburg, who worked on a study of the development of medical centers. He talks about the early development and growth of occupational programs in the community college system.

Cochran describes the relationship between the university president and the deans as “interesting,” and remembers his position was the “buffer in-between.”  He describes the creative efforts of Ed Owens in reaching the black community when they conducted informal orientation sessions for the commuting adult population in Lexington. Cochran mentions the UK Board of Trustees approved the establishment a UK-Northern Kentucky University Graduate Center in July, 1977. He recalls other centers operated around the state. He talks about other board members including Constance Wilson and Michael Adelstein, who were faculty representatives. He felt that there was a general disinterest of the faculty at large about serving on the board or as chair of the Senate Council.

Cochran discusses the Honors Program, which was established around 1963. He recalls the first director, Steve Diachun, a professor of Plant Pathology, and top faculty involved including Robert Evans, James Wills, and Robert Stokes, who helped develop or teach the colloquia for this program. He mentions Dr. Raymond Betts and the Gaines Center for the Humanities. Cochran talks about the Developmental Studies Program, a voluntary staff program aimed at providing special assistance for students who entered UK with low achievement records. He remembers the Experiential Education Program, and individuals who worked with it, including Herbert Grennan and Robert Sexton. Cochran recalls the role of foreign students on campus.  He states that the Iranian student became more visible when the Shah of Iran was overthrown.  He also remembers that UK had students from Indonesia, Thailand, India, and the Orient through UK’s extension programs overseas.

 

85OH187 A/F 270

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: August 6, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran begins this interview by discussing a censorship incident in the late 1970s over the book Black Spring by Henry Miller, which was used in one of the undergraduate English classes.  He recalls that occasionally the issue of academic freedom would surface over course material. Cochran recalls that a student, Mark Goss, complained about the book to his father, Eugene Goss, a lawyer from Harlan, Kentucky, who had been a member of the University of Kentucky’s Board of Trustees. Cochran recalls he responded in a manner designed to keep it from becoming a larger issue. He mentions Joseph Bryant, chair of the English Department at the time. He discusses how the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) and UK added constraints to academic freedom.

Cochran describes ombudsman and their purpose within the university. He mentions the Omnibus Personality Test, given to all entering freshman. Cochran discusses the development of specialty programs at the regional universities, including Eastern Kentucky, Morehead State, and Murray State. He talks about the Council on Higher Education and its recommendations regarding degree programs, particularly the interdisciplinary doctorate degree, and cutbacks in some disciplines. Cochran remembers the problems that developed with the College of Communications in 1979 when they conducted simultaneous searches for a director of the School of Journalism and a dean of the College of Communications. Cochran credits Robert Murphy, professor of Communications, and Herbert N. Drennon, Jr., assistant dean of Arts and Sciences, with helping him with this situation.

Cochran remembers several secretaries for the President’s office, including Ann Wilson and Miss Lucy R. Hogan. He discusses some of the every day activities as well as the responsibilities of his office, the importance of having a small, competent, and dedicated staff in order to be an effective administrator, and the frustrations of working with limited resources. He talks about the informal chain of command in place in case a crisis situation arose while the president was out of town. Cochran recalls his working relationship with President Otis A. Singletary and his observations regarding Singletary’s administrative style. He discusses African Americans and women in faculty and administrative positions, and possible reasons for their low numbers in these roles.

 

85OH200 A/F 271

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN 

Date: August 27, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran mentions the range of services offered by the University of Kentucky that many people are not aware of. He mentions a few of the regulatory services programs that operate out of the Kentucky State Department of Agriculture Office, in particular the equine research programs and race track drug testing. Cochran notes that there are two livestock diagnostic disease laboratories operated by the state’s Department of Agriculture, one in Lexington through UK, the other in Hopkinsville through Murray State University. He talks about the policy of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) towards building specialized research functions at agricultural experiment stations, and the need for approval of research projects.

Cochran gives a summary of Governor Julian Carroll’s administration as it related to UK. He does not rank Carroll as one of the most supportive governors, but did not witness any personal hostility towards UK from Carroll.  Cochran feels that Carroll may not have a real interest in the development of education, especially higher education. Cochran discusses political influence in higher education, and points to the number of law schools in the state as an example. He remembers a budget crisis under Governor John Y. Brown, Jr. and states that those four years are still affecting the university. He recalls a more serious budget cut that occurred in 1967 and had greater consequences.

Cochran discusses the strategic plan of the university and states that Kentucky is “handicapped” by its lack of planning for higher education.  Cochran feels this affects the university’s ability to provide the greatest service to the public. Cochran discusses admissions access and requirements. He recalls that sometimes there was a shift toward operating like a business. Cochran felt these types of policies and procedures are sometimes necessary, but have hampered the university. He mentions the budget freezes for higher education during the 1980s in thirty or more states which affected both faculty and staff morale, and the professional dedication of a university faculty. He discusses the issue of coal mining in Robinson Forest and notes that it is a “short-sighted” look at a permanent asset.

 

85OH206 A/F 273

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: September 10, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses his plans to retire from his position as vice-president of academic affairs at the University of Kentucky. He recalls he made this decision three or four years prior to his actual retirement. He states that it was not his intention to retire from the faculty, and felt that upper administrative positions should change regularly. He remembers that Art Gallaher was selected as his replacement in June of 1980. He notes that their styles were “considerably different.”  He discusses the variation in personality within academic disciplines and how this affects organizational approaches. He mentions several other choices for his replacement, including Charles E. Barnhart and Wimberly Royster.

Cochran emphasizes that academic administrative positions should be filled from within, but that it is desirable to look outside of the university for a president. He talks about his meeting with the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) regarding the reassignment of teaching loads.  Cochran discusses the reorganization of the university, which began about two years before he retired. He emphasizes the importance of a productive, scholarly faculty. He discusses the importance of a careful faculty selection procedure, a good evaluation process, and recruiting. He notes that the reorganization has worked better than expected, and that most problems are due to limitation of resources rather than organization. Cochran talks about the plans to sell Coldstream Farm which he believes is a poor idea, since the land is a big income item and funding appropriations may be reduced as a result.

Cochran talks about the impact a change in presidents has at a university.  He states that two important concerns for an incoming university president at UK are the need to work with the Kentucky constituency to strengthen statewide institutional support for the university, and the development of higher quality academics within the institution. He briefly discusses the history of the Tobacco Research Program, now the Kentucky Tobacco Research and Development Center (KTRDC), and mentions individuals involved in its inception including Albert Clay, Congressman William Natcher, and former governor of Kentucky Earl C. Clements. He mentions early tobacco research completed by the university and the tobacco industries.

 

85OH211 A/F 274

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: September 24, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the formation of the Kentucky Tobacco and Health Research Institute (KTHRI).  The efforts of Congressman William Natcher in Washington, D.C. and Albert Clay at the local level resulted in $1.5 million in appropriations for this project. He discusses the distribution of federal funds for the programs, primarily the plant sciences, in 1966 and 1967. Cochran talks at length about the role of the Kentucky “dedicated tax” in providing additional funding for the program. He mentions members of the policy committee including A.D. Albright, Paul Nagle, William Seay, William Willard, and himself.  In the beginning, Gus Stokes was director, and Raymond C. Bard was chief administrator.

Cochran recalls Albert Clay as a key person in implementing this project. Robert Griffith came from the Brown and Williamson Tobacco Company to be director in 1969.  Cochran discusses Griffith’s world-wide connections with tobacco research, including the Council for Tobacco Research.  He talks about the process of identifying the epidemiological problems associated with smoking, and the “two-hit theory” of the cause of cancer. Cochran describes the organization and consolidation of the research work on campus by Griffith in 1971, when he also developed smoking machines and set up a library system for the KTHRI.  Cochran mentions KTHRI board members including Bernard Keene, Tom Harris, Albert Clay, Mac Walters, Louis Ison, and Dr. Charles E. Barnhart. He talks about the problems with one of the advisors, Dr. Art Stein, a pathologist. Cochran discusses the differences between his opinions and those of Earl Clements.

Cochran felt that Griffith’s early research proposals made the tobacco industry nervous.  He describes his trip overseas to check the Indonesian project and several stops in Europe, including England, to meet with various tobacco research people, and that these trips helped to acquire research funding that had previously been denied. Cochran discusses the political aspects of the tobacco industry and tobacco research. He felt that this program, with its difficult and complex research, would rival any program in the world. Cochran emphasizes that the university, with its talent and objectivity, should serve as the agent for the state on major issues such as drug testing of racehorses or regulatory services.

 

85OH219 A/F 278

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: October 8, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 10 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the early work to establish the University of Kentucky as a research institution. He recalls that UK’s Chandler Medical Center was first major campus construction other than the College of Agriculture with any significant research space.  Cochran discusses the formation of the UK Research Foundation (UKRF). He mentions Merl Baker, who was the first executive director of UKRF with a faculty background. Cochran was also on the UKRF Board for several years. He recalls that support was first given to this project in 1959 by Governor Bert T. Combs, and UK’s College of Agriculture.  He talks at length about how Spindletop Farm was acquired, the formation of the Spindletop Research Board, and the selection of the first director.

In 1964, Governor Edward T. “Ned” Breathitt made the research facility completely independent of state government. Cochran remembers that the state never gave enough for the yearly operating budget, and that it needed to be at least half million per year over a five year period, or the project would not succeed.  In 1961, $3.5 million was allotted for capital expenses such as building, equipment, and personnel.  Cochran talks about Beardsley Graham, the first director of the Spindletop Research facility. Cochran recalls interest in the facility continued with Governor Louie B. Nunn’s administration, and that W.T. Young and Albert Clay raised support money from Kentucky industry to keep it going. He remembers that Kettering Laboratory expressed an interest in locating near UK, although that plan never materialized.

Cochran discusses the final period from 1970 until 1975, when George Evans became chair.  The facility was finally shut down in 1975, rented for office space, and the focus shifted from laboratory to “paper and pencil” applied research. Cochran discusses UK’s College of Engineering status during this time, its relationship to other major university programs, and how the college was nearly eliminated. He recalls that as far back as the 1940s and 1950s there was a “need to move UK into the present century”. He remembers an internal academic revolution occurring nation-wide to develop comprehensive, graduate level universities.

 

85OH238 A/F 279

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: November 5, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Former UK professor and administrator Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the origins of the Kentucky Research Foundation (KRF), which later became University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF).  A committee was formed in 1944 to develop a plan to secure money for research and for the university outside of traditional funding sources. He recalls that Dr. Ernest N. Fergus was one of the original facilitators.  Cochran mentions the difficulty of obtaining money from any source for research, and states the he believes that UK President Herman L. Donovan sought to eliminate the control of state officials over research funds.  Cochran talks at length about how this concept was finally realized in May of 1945 mentioning the involvement of William S. Webb, Frank Murray, C.C. Ross, and Ernest N. Fergus.

In April, 1953, Merl Baker was appointed the first director of the UKRF.  Cochran joined the board of the KRF in 1958 and he explains how it operated. The KRF decided to purchase Spindletop Farm for $850,000 in 1959. Cochran states that he was against this since UK could not take on a debt, and he felt the foundation was being misused for the benefit of the university. He states that he argued for the strengthening of university research instead. He also talks about state appropriated funding for capital and operating expenses.

Cochran recalls that in 1964 the articles of incorporation were revised to appoint the president of the University as the president of the KRF, and he describes the conflict of interest this caused. During this time, A.D. Kirwan became executive director of KRF and Cochran became associate dean of the Graduate School, and Cochran explains that both of them supported research as much as possible. Raymond C. Bard was made executive director in 1964. Cochran remembers the organization’s name was changed to UKRF, possibly in reaction to the problems connected with Spindletop. He points out that the UKRF is now seen as a university organization rather than a state organization. He discusses at length the controversy over Main Chance Farm, which sat between Spindletop and Cold Stream Farms, over which an anti-trust suit was filed against UK and the Keeneland Association. Cochran was named vice-president of the foundation in 1969, and he discusses the Kentucky Attorney General’s lawsuit which accused UKRF with the misuse of university resources.

 

 85OH240 A/F 280 

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN 

Date: November 12, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses the changes that altered the operation of the University of Kentucky Research Foundation (UKRF).  Cochran continues to discuss the Kentucky Attorney General’s lawsuit, which determined that the foundation could no longer retain any of its indirect cost income and required it to operate within the same constraints applied to the university. Consequently, the foundation lost much of its flexibility. Cochran describes at length the process of securing grants through UKRF to the university. He explains that the only money “specifically appropriated for organized research” is for UK’s Agricultural Experiment Station.

Cochran remembers that the attorney general’s lawsuit was used to allocate an ever-increasing amount to the general fund, which made the competition for funding more difficult. He describes the Office for Sponsored Project Administration (OSPA), which was established in 1973 as a consequence of the lawsuit. Other universities were also experiencing these constraints due to mistrust. Cochran refers to Kentucky House Bill 622 as “the last nail in the coffin” for the research foundation. He recalls that, in the early years, Dr. Ernest N. Fergus hoped that the UKRF would become a “line-operating research organization.”  Cochran explains this would have provided flexibility and freedom in seeking research support and conduct of research, away from constraints of state government. He remembers with regret that President Frank L. Donovan envisioned the UKRF as an organization to receive and hold private gifts to avoid co-mingling outside money with state appropriations.

Cochran states that efficiency of research may be reduced by as much as twenty percent by the requirements that now exist. He notes that there is no public understanding of the cost for research, and that the state is not adequately supporting research. He points to the value of research by using the no-till crop techniques researched by UK as an example.  Studies showed that the money spent on research was far less than what farmers saved as a result of using these methods.  Cochran also talks about the university’s patent policy and patent income.

 

85OH255 A/F 281

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: December 17, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran discusses athletics and other events at the University of Kentucky during President Otis A. Singletary’s administration.  He recalls when Fran Curci was appointed as UK’s football coach in 1972, and describes how football recruiting was difficult at that time.  Cochran remembers that although Curci was against such strong competition, he brought in strong athletic talent with “severe shortcomings in other areas.”  Cochran remembers that no player ever had severe academic problems that ever came to his attention, and describes the athletes’ academic program.  He recalls he spoke with the team before practice about academic performance requirements and sometimes had lunch with them.

Cochran discusses problems with the activities of the athletic “boosters”, and he states he disliked the way some of the athletes were exploited. He remembers that it was a difficult time for Singletary when Curci was fired, since they were friends.  Cochran emphasizes that intercollegiate athletic programs have little effect on academics. He talks about his perception of the purpose of athletic programs as public entertainment.  He refers to status within athletic conferences, when schools become linked academically and athletically.  He discusses the economic impact of athletics and the 1952 basketball scandal.

Cochran discusses Adolph Rupp’s retirement, and his refusal to retire at the age set by the retirement policy.  Cochran recalls little interaction with Joe B. Hall. He discusses the pros and cons of moving the men’s basketball games to Rupp Arena. He talks about the Joe B. Hall Wildcat Lodge, which was built on campus for the men’s basketball team, the push for a football dorm, and NCAA sanctions regarding this. Cochran discusses the process of naming university buildings. He talks about Cliff Hagan, a former UK Athletic Director, and the responsibilities of this position. He mentions the positive effects of Toyota Manufacturing coming to Kentucky and the imagery this helped create for Kentucky. Cochran emphasizes the need for the governor and the legislature to support higher education.

 

86OH44 A/F 283

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: January 14, 1986

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran retired from the University of Kentucky in June of 1981, and in March 1982, Kentucky State University asked him to accept the position of dean of Educational Services. He states that the administrative structure at Kentucky State had disintegrated.  He recalls that he was not totally aware of the situation he was facing until he started work.  He talks about his first six months in office and his assessment of the academic program. Cochran was told many times that “presidents of historically black institutions operate on a fairly strong, central, authoritative presidency model.”  Cochran recalls the controversy over the race of KSU’s president, and when President William A. Butts came to KSU in 1975.

Cochran recalls that Governor Julian M. Carroll was supportive of KSU, and that Carroll and Butts had a good working relationship.  He talks about the high percentage of out-of-state students, since so many alumni sought employment in other states, but still sent their children back to KSU.  During the 1978-1979 school year, the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools cited KSU for deficiencies in certain areas and integration became more pressing.  Cochran was not advised of this matter at first, and the annual federal report was not submitted on time. This oversight led to a year’s probation with a possible lost of federal funds. In addition, the Office of Civil Rights announced it would visit Kentucky, and issued a report critical of predominately white universities and their percentages of black faculty and students. In 1980, Governor John Y. Brown, Jr. requested that the Council on Higher Education initiate a study of the future of KSU. Cochran notes that this was the first real focus on the status of KSU as “a major element in the desegregation of higher education”.

Although at one point Cochran considered recommending that the school be closed, he still saw a need for KSU because he felt that Kentucky was still not yet ready to be socially integrated. Cochran notes that desegregation actually hurt KSU because black students were being siphoned off to the larger institutions with scholarship funds. In December of 1981, “Plan Eight,” a revised mission for KSU, was approved. Cochran talks at length about this, in particular the changes in the liberal arts emphasis. He mentions the development of the Whitney Young College of Leadership Studies in 1983. Cochran nearly resigned from KSU at one point. He discusses Raymond Burse’s administration and the funding situation as of 1985.

 

86OH54 A/F 285

LEWIS W. “BUD” COCHRAN

Date: January 28, 1986

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Lewis W. “Bud” Cochran continues the discussion regarding his tenure at Kentucky State University. In October, 1982, he decided to scale back to a part-time basis of one day a week. He served in an advisory role for evaluation and recruiting. Cochran also helped with the development of a policy manual.  He remembers that KSU had made many changes in short period of time, which had been formalized, initiated, but not yet fully implemented since Raymond Burse became president. He talks about physical plant improvements, how private giving increased, and the move towards modest selective admission. He notes that there is still some weakness in the federal program for agriculture research, but the aquaculture (fish farming) research program is improving.

Cochran mentions that there have been “many” degree program suspensions in the disciplines. He is critical of Whitney Young College of Leadership Studies as an honors model, due to its academic isolation from the rest of the institution.  Cochran discusses Burse’s administrative style, especially his strong points as well as his shortcomings. He talks about the competition for competent staff. He remembers the establishment of a community college design at KSU and some of the difficulties with this. Cochran discusses the change to the institute’s mission, and KSU’s total reversal of academic emphasis from a vocational and occupational institution back to a liberal arts university. Cochran goes on to discuss the future of higher education in Kentucky. He thinks Kentucky “has not really made a commitment to excellence,” and that “good instruction and good scholarship is what’s needed.”

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