Skip to main content

Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: C: UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Cole - Cunningham

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, faculty and alumni.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Cole - Cox.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

85OH46 A/F 203

JONELDA COLE 

Date:  February 27, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 50 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

JoNelda Cole was born December 28, 1934 in Forbus, Tennessee. She attended high school at the Alvin C. York Agricultural Institute. She specialized in Textiles and Clothing at the University of Tennessee and received her B.S. degree in Home Economics in 1956. She attended graduate school at both the University of Kentucky and Eastern Kentucky University, where she received her teaching certificate.  Cole’s first job was in Madison County, Kentucky as an assistant home demonstration agent, and she remained there throughout her career.

Cole talks about the many projects and activities she was involved with, and mentions the People to People Tour and the North Central 4-H Camp in Carlisle, Kentucky. She states that her main responsibility as a 4-H agent was to provide opportunities to young people and adults and to encourage them to participate. Cole recalls the support from local people, specifically mentioning State 4-H Alumnus Oliver Cunningham, who helped to integrate the schools in Madison County. In July of 1966, she was made area extension agent, and then was appointed 4-H agent for Madison County in 1970. Cole also helped organize the first day camp in the commonwealth at the Indian Fort Theater in Berea, Kentucky.

Cole explains the role of Cooperative Extension Council system at the county, area, and state level, and the support each level receives from the 4-H Council and the UK College of Agriculture. She describes professional development opportunities, and talks about the support of her husband, the challenges of their careers, and their family. She mentions her civic activities and discusses her participation in professional organizations.

 

84OH107 A/F 161

A. LEE COLEMAN

Date:  November 12, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Grace Zilverberg

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Excellent

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Dr. A. Lee Coleman reminisces about the establishment of the Center for Developmental Change (CDC). He talks about his initial involvement with the center as chair of the Department of Sociology at the University of Kentucky. He says there were many discussions about the need for a social science research center, and talks about a series of meetings connected with forming the research center. Coleman mentions people who attended these meetings such as Dr. Douglas Ensminger and Dr. Irwin Sanders, sociologists who worked with Ford Foundation programs, and Dr. A.D. Albright, executive vice-president of UK. He notes the dramatic growth occurring on UK’s campus at this time under the administration of Dr. John W. Oswald.

Coleman describes the planning stages of the CDC during which he and Dr. Malcolm Jewell visited the Institute for Research and Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and other universities that had planning departments in order to study their curricula. Coleman mentions the composition of a committee for an interdisciplinary faculty seminar regarding a center for developmental change. The CDC became an official unit of UK in 1966. Coleman also describes the search for a director of the center, which resulted in the selection of Dr. Ed Weidner, who served as director from 1966-1967. Coleman recalls that two individuals served as co-director for one year before Dr. Howard Beers was named interim director from 1967 until 1974. The CDC was placed in UK’s College of Agriculture during this time, where Coleman states it became less visible. He talks about changes in the center over time, especially when the Indonesian program was removed.  He also mentions the Peace Corps program, which operated from 1966 until 1971.

 

90OH335 A/F 433

J. WINSTON COLEMAN

Date:  January 9, 1974

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles D. Talbert

Length: 30 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Former University of Kentucky history professor, J. Winston Coleman describes his experiences with Dr. Frank McVey and the Book Thieves Club.  The Book Thieves Club was a group of book lovers composed of University of Kentucky faculty and friends of the university including Thomas D. Clark, John S. Chambers, William H. Townsend, Charles R. Staples, Judge Samuel Wilson, and C.W. Trapp.  Coleman describes the book collection of C.W. Trapp, which had a large number of first edition novels. 

Coleman recalls a road trip that the Book Thieves Club took to Michigan in the spring of 1938.  He states that it was the only time that he saw Dr. McVey get a little tipsy.  Coleman describes Constance Rourke, the only woman who ever attended a Book Thieves Club meeting.  Coleman also mentions tricks that the members of the book thieves played upon one another, and that their wives played on them.  Coleman also discusses the meetings of the Cakes and Ale Club hosted by Judge Samuel Wilson between 1926 and 1940.  He recalls that forty-five to fifty authors and historians from throughout the country would attend, and comment on the rare books and manuscripts that they each brought to the gathering. 

Coleman spends much of the interview talking about former UK President, Dr. Frank L. McVey.  Coleman remembers McVey as a stern person.  He states that McVey had a good sense of humor, but he does not remember seeing McVey laugh.  Coleman talks about McVey’s first wife, Mabel Sawyer, who in his opinion, was reserved and stiff.  In contrast, Coleman recalls that after McVey’s marriage to Frances Jewell, Maxwell Place, became very open and teas, gatherings, and alumni reunions were constantly taking place there.  Coleman also describes some of the history of Maxwell Place.

Coleman was a student at UK when Henry S. Barker was president of the University.  He states that it is difficult to compare Barker and McVey.  Barker was not an academic.  McVey was an academic who brought UK up to true university status.  Coleman also briefly mentions other events in UK history including the consolidation of the Department of Engineering and the falsification of records by Dean Walter Ellsworth Rowe.

  

85OH26 A/F 190

JANICE COLLINS

Date:  January 30, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Janice Taylor Collins was born in Lee County, Kentucky in October of 1935. Her family moved to Lexington, Kentucky when she was four years old, and she received all of her education in Fayette County. Collins graduated from Lafayette High School, and then received her B.S. Degree in Home Economics from the University of Kentucky in 1957. She began her career in Cooperative Extension Services while at UK, with a summer job as a dietician for the 4-H Department at the Summer Day Camp near the Quicksand Area in Breathitt County, Kentucky.

Collins secured a position as assistant home economics agent-in-training in Harlan County after graduation, and after four months she transferred to Breathitt County where she served as the home demonstration agent until 1966.  The area system began in 1966, so she became an area extension specialist in Home Management. In 1967, she transferred to Breathitt County, and then in 1971 she went to the Quicksand area as an agent in Foods and Nutrition, which was her position at the time of this interview. Collins describes the training of extension agents and thinks that young people today are not receiving the broad spectrum of experience and hands-on training today that she experienced.  She talks about two important projects she implemented, home canning and clothing renovation. She discusses other educational programs she conducted in home gardening, commodity foods, financial management, nutrition, and beautification.

Collins discusses the role of the paraprofessionals and their one-to-one interaction with individual homemakers, and working with men in food production or development of skills for home industry. She remembers her work with the Eastern Kentucky Resource Development Project, the Area Extension Council, and 4-H Club. She also talks about her family and her community activities.

 

84OH144 A/F 165

W. B. COLLINS

Date:  November 27, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

William “Bert” Collins was born in Fleming County, Kentucky in 1908. He was the middle child of three children and lived on a 98-acre farm two miles from Flemingsburg, Kentucky. He was able to attend a private high school because he passed an exam that exempted him from tuition. Collins attended the University of Kentucky and earned a B.S. in Agriculture in 1931. He went back to the family farm, but took extra courses in his spare time, sometimes at different colleges, such as Colorado A&M University (now Colorado State University).  He eventually returned to UK and earned a Master’s degree in Agricultural Economics.

Collins recalls “the Panic of 1931”, and states that farmers had a difficult time during the 1920s because they were unable to expand their operations.  There were few tractors and fewer hard surface roads, the combine was unknown, and electricity was limited. Collins discusses his work doing farm surveys with U.K. in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture.  He talks about the chores in the home and the few conveniences that were available for the women. Collins first worked for UK’s Cooperative Extension Service as an assistant county agent in Nicholas County, Kentucky before transferring to Bracken County for five years. He then worked in Mason County for 35 years as the agricultural county agent.

Collins recalls that methods of working with the farmers were more informal at that time. He states it was his job “to help them move to new ideas and new approaches to things,” and feels that this is still the purpose of the Cooperative Extension Service today. He discusses the changes in farming over the years, the movement towards bigger farms, and notes the biggest change as the out-of-pocket cost of production. Collins talks about agents he has supervised over the years. He recalls his retirement from UK in the mid-1970s, and his subsequent positions representing the Bank of Maysville, Kentucky, and working with farm problems. He talks about his family, and reminisces about some humorous experiences during his career. 

 

81OH85 A/F 142

CARL B. CONE

Date: July 23, 1981

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  2 hours 35 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions:  None

Carl B. Cone was born in Davenport, Iowa in 1916. His family moved to Iowa City, where his father worked for the telephone company. Cone entered the University of Iowa in 1936 at the age of nineteen. He received his M.S. in 1937, and his Ph.D. in 1940, at the age of 24. Cone worked at the Iowa Historical Society, and then at Louisiana State University.  In 1947, he came to the University of Kentucky to teach British history.

Cone talks at great length about his teaching responsibilities and research work under Dr. Thomas D. Clark. He describes the difficulties of hiring faculty today including changes in recruiting practices. Cone refers to the issue of academic freedom in the classroom and recalls how President Herman L. Donovan handled this. He mentions the lack of philanthropic efforts among members of the Lexington community in supporting UK and other non-profit institutions. In 1961, Cone served on the Curriculum Committee of the Kentucky State Commission on Public Education. He describes at great length the University of the Kentucky Research Foundation (U.K.R.F.), which began during Donovan’s tenure. In 1962, during President Frank G. Dickey’s tenure, Cone was appointed chair of a committee formed to make changes to the U.K.R.F. A new medical center was being planned.

Cone became chair of the Department of History in 1965. He talks at length about the criteria for evaluating faculty in terms of teaching, research, writing, and service. He recalls desegregation at UK, and discusses the history of university athletics.  Cone emphasizes the corruptness of university athletics throughout the country, and states the he feels that athletics dominates U.K.’s thinking.  He makes observations about his experiences with the university through the tenures of several UK presidents. Cone thinks that universities are losing the sense of purpose he believes existed in minds of the founders, including “education and training of young people” and adding “to the stock of human knowledge through faculty contribution by way of research and publication.” He also emphasizes the importance of the UK Libraries to the university.

 

90OH47 A/F 396

VIRGINIA K. CONROY

Date:  March 20, 1990

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Virginia K. Conroy is originally from Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. She remembers her parents, Agnes King and Joseph Morgan Conroy, and talks about a first cousin, Kitty Conroy. She says the King women traditionally went to Cardome Academy in White Sulphur, Kentucky, which was later moved to Georgetown, Kentucky, but Conroy graduated from Mt. Sterling High School. Conroy decided to go to the University of Kentucky in the fall of 1924, where she majored in Journalism and minored in French. She recalls being homesick and almost quitting. Conroy describes her living accommodations with various family members and with the Kappa Delta sorority, and discusses her daily life and activities on campus. She mentions various instructors, including Dr. Sarah Blanding and Dr. Margaret McLaughlin, and notes the few women professors at that time. Conroy also pledged the journalism sorority, Theta Sigma Phi, in her sophomore year and worked for UK’s Kentuckiana newspaper (later renamed the Kentucky Kernel).

Conroy states that jobs were scarce in the late 1920s. After graduating from UK, she completed a correspondence course in speed writing and took a secretarial position at the Lafayette Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky. In 1932 she became secretary to the president of Morehead College, William H. Vaughn. In 1941, she came back to work at the Lafayette Hotel as assistant manager until 1960. In July 1961, she went to work at the UK Medical Center as a secretary to Dr. Wellington B. Stewart, the chair of the Department of Pathology, until she retired in 1971. She discusses the social changes regarding women in terms of sexual morals as well as educational opportunities, and emphasizes that women were bound by the regulations in place at the time. Conroy never married.

 

77OH67 A/F 71

MARY HESTER COOPER

Date:  September 20, 1977

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Cathy Cooper

Length: 1 hour 15 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Mary Hester Cooper and her brother both enrolled in the University of Kentucky in the fall of 1921.  She majored in Mathematics and recalls an excellent department.  She states that Miss Flora Elizabeth LeStourgeon was her favorite professor, and that Dr. Frank L. McVey “frightened” her at first.  Cooper explains that the campus was smaller at the time, and she did not participate in many social activities because she was so busy.  However, she does mention that there was a rifle team for the girls. Cooper was a graduate assistant in the math department for two years and received her Master’s degree in 1927. After graduation she accepted the position of department head in Mathematics and Physics at Pikeville Junior College for one year, and then transferred to Lindsey Wilson College, where she also taught for one year. 

Cooper returned to U.K. in 1936 to work with Ezra Gillis, U.K.’s first registrar.  In 1937, Gillis created the Bureau of Source Materials in Higher Education, which reported directly to the President’s Office. She recalls one of the bureau’s main objectives was to collect information on the history of higher education in Kentucky. In 1956, Gillis sent Cooper to Washington D. C. for five weeks to receive training as an archivist.  He then appointed Cooper as University Archivist.  The bureau’s name was changed to the University Educational Archives. She discusses the types of information and materials collected for the archives, and mentions working with Dr. Thomas D. Clark. In 1963, the responsibility of the archives was transferred to the office of the vice-president, and then in 1964, the archives became part of the UK Libraries. Cooper describes the new location, and recalls the helpfulness of Margaret I. King. She also remembers that her office worked closely with Jacqueline Bull, director of the Department of Special Collections.

In 1962, Cooper asked President Frank G. Dickey to appoint a committee on archives. She states that they made recommendations, gave a definition of what archives were, and what was needed for an official archives, including a records management program. She describes the process of compiling information for the War Memorial Survey, and research for the World War II Memorial. She mentions several people that worked on this project, including John Sherman Horine.

 

76OH01 A/F 15

VIRGIL COUCH

Date:  January 12, 1976

Location:  Arlington, Virginia

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No       

Restrictions: None

Virgil Couch was born in 1907 in Princeton, Kentucky. He recalls his first trip to UK in 1924-1925 when he was a member of the championship debating team at Beaver Dam High School in Ohio County, Kentucky. He graduated from high school in 1926 and enrolled in the University of Kentucky in the fall. Couch recalls some of his work experiences before and during his college years. He talks about some of his first-year experiences at UK and remembers several professors. Couch discusses his service with the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC), his experiences as a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, and his advertising work for the Kentucky Kernel, UK’s student newspaper.

Couch recalls that WHAS, a radio station located in Louisville, Kentucky, set up a remote station on the campus of UK in the Guignol Theater. He talks about his experiences as an announcer at the station, and mentions the Farm and Home Hour, an educational radio show. He describes how they set up “listening posts” in rural areas so that people could hear the programs. He used this idea for remote areas of Italy while he was working with the Marshall Plan. Couch also remembers student activities surrounding the football games. He mentions belonging to SuKy, a student volunteer group that sold concessions at the games, and recalls that in 1930 he was elected editor of the Kentuckian, UK’s yearbook. He graduated from the University of Kentucky with a B.S. degree in Commerce in 1930.  Couch was the first director of personnel for the Economic Cooperation Administration (Marshall Plan) from 1948-1950. He states that he was on the cover of Time magazine in 1961 for his work with the Civil Defense program.

 

76OH07 A/F 18

RUSSELL COX 

Date:  January 15, 1976

Location:  Washington, D. C.

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Russell Cox attended the University of Kentucky during the 1930s and he discusses a few of his experiences. He recalls his membership in the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) at the University of Kentucky.  He mentions female professors such as Sarah Blanding, Dean of Women, and states that he did not feel that women were discriminated against on the campus.  He talks about various political figures including Governor A.B. “Happy” Chandler, and states that most students were in awe of President Frank L. McVey.  He explains that professors were not “publicly” reprimanded or “ousted” for their political views, and discusses the academic achievements of professors.  Cox feels that the athletics program was not overemphasized while he was at UK. Cox left law school to work in Washington, D.C.

 

96OH05 A/F 535

SUSAN BRADLEY COX

Date:  November 12, 1995

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Maurice Clay and Terry Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

Susan Bradley Cox grew up in Paducah, Kentucky. She was a cheerleader in high school, and recalls that her school had a good physical education program but no competitive sports for girls, and no swimming pool.  Cox taught swimming for the Red Cross at the public pool, at the country club, and Kentucky Lake.  Cox attended Florida Southern College for one semester in 1955, but then transferred to the University of Kentucky her second semester. She joined the Blue Marlins, a synchronized swimming group, and she describes her activities with this water ballet group. She majored in Physical Education, with a double minor in Biological Sciences and Psychology. Cox is a member of the Delta Delta Delta sorority. She talks about her two mentors at UK, Bernard “Skeeter” Johnson, whom she said “was ahead of his time,” and Stella S. Gill, who was her supervisor for student teaching and the cheerleading sponsor.

Cox wanted to pursue a career in physical therapy but was discouraged by her mother, and instead earned a Master’s degree from UK in Guidance Counseling. She states the climate for women on campus was open, and that opportunities for women on campus were equal. Cox talks at great length about her experiences with the UK cheerleading squad. She was a cheerleader when UK won the men’s NCAA basketball national title at Louisville, Kentucky in 1958. She mentions several players from that team, including Vernon Hatton and Adrian “Odie Smith,” and recalls Coach Adolph Rupp’s ideas regarding the cheerleading squad.  Cox coached the UK cheerleaders from 1962 to 1972 after she graduated from UK, and recalls that Patricia and Priscilla Barnstable were on the team. She talks about her participation in a triathlon in the 1960s, and describes how the triathlon competition began in Lexington.  She also discusses innovative teaching techniques she uses such as exercising to music. Cox was involved with International Triathlon, Master Swimmer All-American, Triathlon All-American, and participated in the Ironman competition.

 

88OH221 A/F 335

VIRGINIA B. COX

Date:  October 19, 1988

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Janice Crane

Length: 1 hour 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Virginia B. Cox was born in Madison, Indiana in January of 1908. Her father taught math at Hanover College in Madison, before moving the family to Ithaca, New York to work on his Ph.D. at Cornell University. Her mother taught Greek and Latin at Park College in Parkville, Missouri. Her father came to the University of Kentucky as a math instructor, became head of the math department, and then was appointed dean of the College of Arts and Sciences where he remained until his death. Cox was home-schooled until the age of eight, and then attended Sayre School, a private Presbyterian school at the time, through the eighth grade. She notes that tuition at the city schools was more expensive than at the private schools. Cox graduated from the University Model High School, and describes the history of the school.

After high school, Cox attended the University of Kentucky, and remembers how much smaller the university was at that time.  After graduation, Cox taught English at Sayre High School and the University High School at the same time. She describes both high schools as college preparatory schools. She recalls May Day at Sayre, a yearly event at the school, where they sometimes performed Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” on the front lawn. Cox worked in the music department at Sayre during the 1930s. She had her first child in 1936, left Lexington in 1942, and returned around 1947 or 1948.  Cox’s children attended the University School and she describes how she paid their tuition through her work with the school. The University School was seen as more permissive, but she says this was due to the behavior of a few wealthy students. Cox recalls University High School had a long-serving, cohesive faculty.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Creech - Cunningham.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

93OH04 A/F 521

GLENWOOD L. CREECH 

Date:  May 5, 1992

Location:  Fayette County, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

Glenwood L. Creech was born in 1920 in Casey County, Kentucky. His father, Dr. C.B. Creech, was from Harlan County, Kentucky and attended the University of Louisville’s School of Medicine.  His mother was Tennessee “Tenney” Estes Creech.  He describes what he knows of his parent’s early life and talks about the life of a country doctor, where and how his father practiced, and how this life affected the family.

Creech began his education at the age of five in “a multi-room school”, and graduated from Middleburg High School in 1936. He attended UK for one semester but did not do well so his father sent him to Centre College.  Creech did not like Centre, and he recalls returning to UK.  He mentions Carsie Hammonds, a favorite teacher who taught a problem-solving methods course called “Teaching Agriculture.”  Creech graduated from UK in 1941 with a B.S. degree in Agriculture.

Creech remembers the affects of the Great Depression on both rural and urban areas.  He remembers vividly his father’s appreciation of rural electrification, and talks about the difference it made in people’s lives. Creech recalls his father’s reaction to the invention of penicillin.  Creech came back to Casey County after serving in World War II. He entered the post-war agricultural program for veterans where he was paid to teach, and helped to start the program at Stanford High School in Lincoln County.  He went back to UK and earned his M.S. in Agriculture in 1950.

 

93OH05 A/F 522

GLENWOOD L. CREECH 

Date:  January 20, 1993

Location:  Fayette County, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

Glenwood L. Creech discusses some of the difficulties in interpreting and presenting the University of Kentucky to the general public, explaining its mission, and maintaining public support. Creech served as UK’s vice-president of university relations from 1965-1968.  He describes his duties in this position. Creech states that he admired President John W. Oswald and respected his goals, particularly his goal of building UK into a “prestigious institution.”  Creech recalls that he disagreed with Oswald over the shift in emphasis from teaching to the research, and notes that he almost resigned over this difference in philosophy.

Creech states that he admired Governor Louie B. Nunn, but recalls Nunn’s dislike of Oswald.  Creech explains that he never had any aspirations to be a university president, although his name was mentioned as a replacement when Oswald left. Creech talks about the qualities he feels are needed to be a successful public university president, and explains that these characteristics are totally unrelated to academic attainment. He believes that “the principal job of the president is to protect the integrity of the institution, and all the implications that it has.” He discusses at great length the issue of obtaining adequate resources to keep the university viable as well as competitive.

 

76OH18 A/F 27

JOHN R. CROCKETT  

Date: March 1, 1976

Location:  Louisville, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

John R. Crockett talks about the Adolph Rupp and the University of Kentucky basketball program.  He states that the program gave Kentucky “an identity” and explains that he “would rather have sat on Coach Rupp’s bench than play varsity ball for any other school in this country.” Crockett describes the unrest on campus during the Vietnam War and explains that things settled down after the war ended. He evaluates Dr. Otis A. Singletary’s tenure at UK as very positive.  Crockett later served on the Past Presidents Advisory Council and as president of the UK Alumni Association in 1972.

 

85OH57 A/F 209

SUSAN LANGLEY CRUSE  

Date:  March 12, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Susan Donald Langley Cruse was born on a farm near Spotsville in Henderson County, Kentucky in 1927.  She received her B.S. degree in Home Economics from Western Kentucky State Teacher’s College (now Western Kentucky University) in 1949. In 1971, she went back to WKU and received a Master’s degree in Home Economics Education. Cruse says she “was almost born into extension work.”  Her parents were great supporters of extension services, and even named her after Donald Langley, the Henderson County extension agent at the time. Cruse became an assistant home demonstration agent for Ohio, Logan, and Christian Counties in Kentucky during the summer of 1949. She recalls the differences in these areas and the people with whom she worked. She remembers that there was more on-the-job training and less theory when she first began in the field, and explains how training methods are different today.

Since 1950, Cruse has served in Larue County, Kentucky as a county agent. She describes the dynamics of this area and some of her projects, such as food and nutrition, food preservation, and tailoring. She talks about her work with the Homemaker Clubs, the Utopia Clubs for young people, 4-H Club, and the county fair. Cooper was also an area agent in the Lincoln Trail area during this time, and worked primarily in the area of food and nutrition, which she recalls gave her the opportunity to travel to various counties and meet different people. She discusses her work with the County, Area, and State Extension Councils, as well as various organizations, and how they have provided the opportunity for leadership development to the farmers. Cooper describes how the contributions of the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture helped her become a better county agent. She mentions that she was the first county agent allowed to stay in the program after marriage and maternity leave. Cruse talks about her two marriages and her family.

 

96OH71 A/F 556

DANIEL CRUTCHER  

Date:  April 19, 1996

Location:  Louisville, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Lee Burchfield

Length:  1 hour 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No 

Restrictions: None

Daniel Crutcher attended a Jesuit boarding school in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin before he enrolled at the University of Kentucky in 1970. He changed his major several times from Journalism to English.  He transferred to the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1973, and then back to UK in 1974.  Crutcher talks about the Kentucky Kernel, UK’s student newspaper, and how he was made editorial editor almost immediately upon joining the paper. He recalls the political agenda of UK’s students was far less intense than those at the University of Wisconsin. Crutcher talks at great length about the “splintered political climate” during the Vietnam War. He also remembers a pervasive undercurrent of racial tension on campus, and talks about the basketball rivalry between UK and the University of Louisville, which he feels was racially motivated. He talks about a tenant house he and several students rented near the Iroquois Hunt Club in Clark County, Kentucky, from Fauntleroy Pursley.  Crutcher recalls they moved there to experience the “back-to-the-land movement.”

Crutcher refers to UK’s version of an underground newspaper called the Bluetail Fly. He mentions several of Kentucky’s regional writers like Wendell Berry, Ed McClanahan, Guy Mendez, James Baker Hall, and Gurney Norman who wrote for this paper.  Crutcher describes his first freelance piece and meeting and marrying his wife.  Crutcher and his wife eventually moved to Louisville, Kentucky where they worked for the Actor’s Guild of Louisville. Crutcher began freelance writing for the Louisville Courier-Journal. He resigned from the newspaper in 1996 to pursue a free-lance career.  Crutcher describes handling press relations for Fred Cowan’s campaign for Kentucky Attorney General.  In 1991 when Cowan ran for lieutenant governor, Crutcher again worked for Cowan doing opposition research.

 

84OH149 A/F 167

ISOBEL CRUTCHFIELD 

Date: December 4, 1984

Location:  Louisville, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

Isobel Crutchfield was born in Todd County, Kentucky in 1921. She received her B.S. degree in General Home Economics and her M.S. degree in Home Economics Education from the University of Kentucky. She became interested in the Cooperative Extension Service through her work in previous home economics jobs.  In 1949, Crutchfield began her career with UK’s Cooperative Extension Service in Webster County, Kentucky, as an agent-in-training.  She then spent nine years in Hopkins County, Kentucky, and in 1959 she came to Christian County where she remained, except for a period of time when she worked in the Purchase and Pennyrile areas as a 4-H field agent. She compares living conditions today to those in the 1940s.

Crutchfield states that she “tried to help people to solve their problems and make decisions,” and to “recognize and develop their leadership capabilities.”  She says that assistance from the media was invaluable in disseminating information to people. She discusses the differences between operating the Youth Day Camps and the 4-H Camps. Crutchfield describes her special interest workshops, such as estate planning, clothing construction, refinishing furniture, and handicrafts. She talks about the opportunities the extension service provides personnel for furthering their educations. Crutchfield also discusses the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (E.F.N.E.P.), which originated to help low-income families feed their families more adequately and to improve their standard of living.

 

00OH82 A/F 611

JACKIE CRUZE and RUTH MILLION  

Date:  August 19, 1997

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Sharon Childs

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: Permission of Sharon Childs Required

 

91OH37 A/F 440

GEORGE CUNHA  

Date:  February 26, 1991

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Karen Ellenberg

Length: 

Audio Conditions: Good 

Transcript:  First Draft 

Restrictions: None

George Martin Cunha was a book preservation and conservation expert who had a large impact on the conservation program of the University of Kentucky Libraries.  In this interview, he talks about the origins of his interest in books and book-binding.  Cunha joined the U.S. Navy, but states that he continued to acquire rare books during his travels. He recalls that he was motivated to investigate why books that were 200 to 300 years old were in better condition than newer volumes. He lived on the south coast of England between 1949 and 1951 while taking part in a navy exchange program with the Royal Navy.  Here he met a retired gentleman who taught him bookbinding. Cunha later attended the Navy War College and then worked near Brown University in Rhode Island, where he took further bookbinding lessons. He remembers that his wife suggested that he pursue conservation and preservation as a second career after he retired from the navy.  Cunha wrote several libraries offering his services and the Boston Athenaeum accepted.

Cunha worked at the Athenaeum for ten years and describes his work with George Washington’s library.  During this time he also traveled to many places in Europe to study bookbinding techniques. He discusses his first cooperative conservation efforts in Massachusetts, in particular the New England Document Conversation Center, where he was appointed the first director in 1973. He states that he considers himself to be a conservator, and explains that “conservation needs to be an integral part of the management of the library.” 

Cunha talks about the history and research of acid hydrolysis, aqueous and non-aqueous deacidification of paper, and the need for mass deacidification techniques for the conservation and preservation of collections.  He discusses the differences between these concepts and bookbinding. He talks about the discovery in Europe of an alkaline paper process that halted the deterioration of paper. He discusses the history of handmade papermaking and talks about papermakers he met in Istanbul, Turkey.

 

91OH85 A/F 441

GEORGE CUNHA  

Date:  March 5, 1991

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Karen Ellenberg

Length: 

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this interview, George Martin Cunha discusses at great length the crafts of bookbinding and papermaking. He mentions various books and authors on these subjects, and describes the similarities of vellum and parchment paper. He talks about watermarks. Cunha discusses Gutenberg’s first moveable type printing process and the carbon ink used. He states that when printers began to use the offset printing process in the 1940s, they began to experiment with aniline dye inks. He describes how a first impression of a book is made today with carbon ink on moveable type, and then the offset plates are made with this original copy using “generally less durable inks.” He talks about the opportunities he has had for travel and meeting people due to his interest in bookbinding.

Cunha has studied bookbinding from both the craftsman’s and preservationist point of view. He talks about the need for printers to continue practices learned over the centuries, and notes that fine book making is the same today as it was in the 1490s. Cunha explains that paper has not changed in two thousand years, but it is what people have done to it, such as treating paper with alum and rosin, that has changed.  He comments that bookbinding requires the characteristic of patience, and the success of the Guild of Book Workers in America is due to the dedication and capable leadership of these women. He also discusses the techniques of Japanese bookbinding.

 

95OH202 A/F 534

ANNETTE MCGEE CUNNINGHAM  

Date:  December 1, 1995

Location:  Dayton, Ohio

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell and Carolyn Bratt

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: Yes

Restrictions: None

Annette McGee Cunningham was born in 1954 in Dayton, Ohio and is the eldest of two children. Her mother received her Bachelor’s degree in Library Science from the University of Minnesota in the1940s, and came to Dayton to become a public librarian. Her father graduated from Ohio State University Law School in 1948 and went into private practice in Dayton, Ohio. Her father was active in politics and a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).  He eventually became the first African-American mayor of Dayton. Cunningham notes that Dayton is possibly the most segregated area in the United States. Her family moved to different areas in Dayton, eventually settling in an area called Daytonview, which was integrated, where Cunningham attended Cornell Heights and Fairview High School.

Cunningham wanted to attend a black college away from Dayton and chose Tennessee State University, where she majored in Political Science, with a minor in Education. After graduation, she came back to Dayton and entered the Master’s degree program at Wright State University and applied to law school. She and her future husband, Shirley Cunningham, chose to attend the University of Kentucky. She became a member of Phi Alpha Delta, a professional service organization. Cunningham graduated from UK in 1980 and received a Reggie Scholarship.  She delivered her first son and took the bar exam three weeks later in June of 1981. 

Cunningham talks at great length about her experiences in law school and states that although she experienced little negativity, she was aware of the “good old boy system” still in place at the time.  She decided to pursue a career in legal services and worked in Lexington from 1981 until 1986. She discusses the problems that two careers created with her marriage, and notes that she divorced in 1985. Cunningham moved back to Dayton where she practiced law with her father for six months, worked with a group practice for two years, and eventually chose a career with the juvenile court system. She talks about how her experiences with divorce and as a mother have helped her in her law practice.

Browse The Oral History Collection By Subject Or Keyword.