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Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: D - G: UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Gaines - Gulley

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, faculty and alumni.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Gaines - Gifford.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

02OH63 A/F 641

JOHN R. GAINES

Date:  March 15, 2002

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 

Audio Conditions: 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

UK benefactor, John R. Gaines was born in 1928 in Sherburne, New York.  Gaines describes his Irish ancestry and his family’s history in New York State.  His great-grandfather came to New York from Ireland and worked on the Chenango Canal.  He settled on a farm in Chenango County, and Gaines’ grandfather then started a lumber business, Thomas P. Gaines and Sons.  John Gaines describes how his father worked for his grandfather and also began to experiment with making hog and cattle feed and dog food.  His father was so successful with his dog food, that he turned his hobby into a profitable business which was bought by General Foods. 

Gaines describes how his family became involved in the horse business.  His grandfather started training and raising horses and Gaines remembers some of his favorite horses.  After selling his dog food company, Gaines’ father retired and looked into buying a horse farm in Kentucky.  Gaines remembers that his father looked at the Castles horse farm which was in shambles at the time, but decided on a farm called Overbrook on Tates Creek Road.  Gaines also recalls a friend of his grandfather, W.M. Reynolds who had one of the greatest years in horse racing history with three champion pacers.  He remembers a trainer that his father hired named Brosmer who was also involved in breeding game chickens.  Gaines and Brosmer became good friends and Brosmer taught him how to judge all breeds of animals.  He describes his mother’s side of the family and remembers his mother as a beautiful woman with great common sense.  His mother’s brother, Louie and his father bought a race track called Vernon Downs along with some other friends.  He recalls his father’s interest in dogs and a dog who won the national pheasant championship and best of breed at Madison Square Garden. 

Gaines remembers his experience at Culver Military Academy in Culver, Indiana, and states that he hated every minute of it.  He met a coach there though who encouraged him to attend Norte Dame, and he describes his experiences at Norte Dame.  He began as a business major, but disliked it and started skipping classes to work at the Studebaker plant in South Bend, Indiana.  He recalls how upset his father was when he found out.  Shortly thereafter, Gaines explains that he changed his major to liberal arts, which he liked very much.  Gaines also describes his interest in art which began as early as the third grade, and explains how he was able to purchase a painting by Leonardo DiVinci.

 

85OH10 A/F

ART GALLAHER, JR.

Date:  December 24, 1980

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Grace M. Zilverberg

Length:  1 hour, 20 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Excellent 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Art Gallaher came to the University of Kentucky in 1963 to work with a newly developing program for social change which eventually became UK’s Center for Developmental Change (CDC).  Art Gallaher also became a faculty member in the Anthropology Department at this time.  He describes the development of the CDC and recalls primary movers including Tom Ford, Lee Coleman, and Jim Brown of the Sociology Department.  Others involved included Eldon Smith of Agriculture, David Blythe of Engineering, and Bob Strauss of Behavioral Sciences.  One idea that they had was to put together a seminar series, and Gallaher explains that he took primary responsibility for putting together these seminars.

Gallaher describes the search for a director for the CDC.  Meanwhile in July of 1964, he was asked to take over the active directorship of the center and he discusses his role in advertising the goals of the CDC to the university and grant providers.  He describes CDC’s international concern for developing areas and the evaluation of a Kellogg project on Appalachian development.  Ed Weidner eventually accepted the position of Director of the CDC, and Gallaher went to Western Ireland to do research on a grant project.  Gallaher was then offered the role of Deputy Director of the CDC.  Gallaher describes the work of the CDC at this time such as their involvement with the Peace Corps and a project in Knox County, Kentucky.  Gallaher also explains Weidner’s hope of developing an exchange program with the University of Ghent in Belgium for research into coal mining in Belgium and Kentucky which proved to not be feasible.

Gallaher discusses the difficulty of getting people involved in the CDC due to the upheaval and restructuring of the University of Kentucky during the Oswald administration.  He describes Weidner’s decision to leave UK to serve as Chancellor of the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay, and how the CDC took over UK’s Indonesian project.  Gallaher discusses other CDC projects after Howard Beers became director including a successful Thailand project and an unsuccessful program studying rural poverty.   Gallaher left the CDC in 1970 and became Chairman of the Department of Anthropology and only slightly remained in contact with the CDC.  He states that the CDC is different than it was in the beginning and that when Thomas Ford took over the directorship of the CDC, he had a much more realistic picture of the role of the organization.  He also describes interdisciplinary programs at other universities like Harvard.   

 

76OH76 A/F 42

O.F. GALLOWAY

Date:  September 17, 1976

Location: Louisville, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour, 20 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: None

Dr. O.F. Galloway was born in 1891 in Breckinridge County, Kentucky. He attended Kentucky Wesleyan College in Winchester, Kentucky, but transferred to the University of Kentucky in the Fall of 1923 to finish his degree.  Prior to entering UK, Galloway had taught for ten years in various schools throughout Kentucky especially in Todd and Jefferson Counties.  Galloway decided to finish his degree at UK, because he felt that UK had more prestige.

Galloway majored in Classics and recalls T.T. Jones, one of his professors who later became Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences.  He describes his experiences with Dr. Frank McVey, who was president of the university at that time.  Galloway states that McVey was very devoted to scholarship, and remembers how Dr. McVey shut down the Senior Court, a student organization which was developed in order to keep freshmen students in line.  Galloway talks about other social activities of the students.  He recalls being a member of the debate team along with John Y. Brown, future governor of Kentucky.  He remembers seeing plays at Guignol Theatre and discusses the relationship between the university and the city of Lexington.  Galloway describes Dr. Funkhouser, with whom he became well-acquainted through his work with the Graduate Club, an organization of graduate students who had one large banquet each year with a distinguished speaker.  He also remembers Professor W.R. Sutherland, who was attacked for being too liberal. 

Galloway talks about the role of athletics on the campus at that time.  He describes a controversy surrounding the playing of Centre College, and discusses the reaction of students on campus when a UK football player was killed in a game against the University of Cincinnati.  He discusses the active role of women on campus and describes UK’s women’s basketball team.  He recalls female faculty members like Sarah Blanding, the Dean of Women, and a professor who taught French.  He remembers that that old Carnegie library was too small, and the joy when the new King Library was opened.

After completing his Bachelor’s degree, Galloway pursued a Master’s degree and then a Doctorate in education at UK.  He describes Dean Taylor of the College of Education and Leo Chamberlain who was his advisor on his doctorate dissertation.  From 1930 until 1931, he served as an assistant in the Bureau of School Services.  He discusses his work on school surveys.  The topic of Galloway’s dissertation was higher education for negros in Kentucky, and he describes his decision to pursue a unique dissertation at that time.  Galloway, who received his PhD in 1931, was one of the first three people to receive a doctorate degree at the University of Kentucky.  Galloway found employment at MacMurray College in Illinois where he stayed for 28 years and became head of the department of education.

 

79OH188 A/F 96

JAMES H. GARDENER

Date:  November 14, 1978

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  John Jason Peter

Length: 

Audio Conditions: 

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: None

James H. Gardner, a UK faculty member, recalls the events leading up to the burning of the ROTC building in 1970.  Gardner came to UK in the fall of 1966 to teach English, and was a young professor in 1970. He recalls his shock when he heard of the tragedy at Kent State University where student protestors were killed by Ohio National Guard troops.  He describes UK students’ attempts to invade a UK Board of Trustee meeting the day after the tragedy.  He discusses the attempts of the campus police to disperse the students.  Gardner also talks about a rally later that evening during which symbolic coffins were carried.  Gardner describes his personal feelings about the deaths at Kent State.  He recalls the burning of the ROTC building on campus and describes the reaction when Governor Louie B. Nunn sent National Guard troops to campus.  He discusses attempts by faculty members to protect students and their decisions to cancel finals that spring. 

 

88OH222 A/F 336

JESS GARDNER

Date:  October 20, 1988

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Janice Crane

Length:  1 hour, 30 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: None

Jess Gardner, a former teacher at UK’s University School, was born in Hodgenville, Kentucky.  He attended Purdue University, from which he graduated in 1944.  He served in the Army during World War II, and was wounded.  Gardener explains that being wounded changed his focus since it allowed him to teach in a military academy in Columbia, Tennessee.  He decided to become a teacher and came to the University of Kentucky to work towards his teaching certificate.  Gardner recalls doing his student teaching at Lafayette High School and the University School and describes the vast differences.  When offered a job at the University School, he took it citing the higher pay and better facilities.

Throughout his career, Gardner taught math, social studies, and science to junior high school students.  He also taught sociology and geography at the senior high school level.  He taught at the university school until it closed in the mid-1960s.  Gardner recalls that teaching at the University School was fun.  He describes the student population as consisting of children with high motivation and very low motivation.  He remembers few average students.  He explains that the parents were also very cooperative and that they were willing participants in school activities.  He recalls activities available to the students including the opportunity to learn by doing such as participating in a mock United Nations and participating in music programs and many different clubs.  He discusses the view in the Lexington and UK community that the University School catered to the well-to-do families, but does little to refute this allegation.

Gardner also talks about the teaching methods of the University School in comparison to other schools, and problems with funding.  He recalls how most of the students came from Central Kentucky, but that he and other faculty members wanted to bring students to the University School from other areas of the state, but did not receive the funding to do this.  He states that the closing of the school was mainly due to a budget crunch and recalls the outrage of many of the teachers and parents.               

 

92OH67 A/F 460

LORRAINE GARKOVICH

Date:  March 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Karen Baum

Length:  1 hour, 5 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Fair 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Lorraine Garkovich was employed as a Professor of Sociology with the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture.  She was born in New York City in 1950 and completed her Bachelor’s degree, Master’s degree, and PhD at the University of Missouri-Columbia.  She explains that she knew from the time she was twelve or thirteen that she wanted to be a college professor.  For her, it was simply a question of what she was going to teach.  Garkovich describes how several incidents affected her decision to pursue a degree in sociology, namely that the psychology department at the University of Missouri-Columbia was not cooperative with the fact that she wanted to graduate in three years.  Garkovich also explains that sociology allows her to combine many of her interests, and recalls the effect that her involvement on the debate team in high school and college had on her skills and abilities. 

Garkovich describes what she likes about her work, along with her frustrations.  She states that she enjoys working with local people to translate her research into forms that they can use.  She explains that most female sociologist end up in non-academic positions, most likely due to the heavy work load of the academic career.  She talks about the male-oriented schedule of the academic career, explain that it is not unusual for her to spend sixty hours a week working between her teaching, research, and extension activities.  She describes her decision to take a position at UK, because it offered her more opportunities if she ever wanted to leave.  Garkovich describes her involvement in the Family Community Leadership, a home economics extension program allowing women to become more involved in their communities, and some of her other extension activities with farm families.  She discusses the skills and abilities required for someone in her line of work, especially the importance of time management, and her personal interest in horse shows.

 

92OH80 A/F 464

LORRAINE GARKOVICH

Date:  March 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Karen Baum

Length:  1 hour, 10 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

In this second interview with Sociology Professor Lorraine Garkovich, she talks about the conditions of the University of Kentucky in general.  She feels that the greatest achievement of UK is the Women’s Studies report on the status of women at the university.  She feels that the largest impact will be upon female staff, who were being largely overlooked in salary, benefits, and status.  The most significant problem that she finds on campus is the physical distance between parts of the campus. 

 Garkovich explains that a more effective use of faculty committees would better facilitate her work.  She describes how women and minorities are often overwhelmed with invitations to be part of faculty committees.  Garkovich further discusses the influence of gender on academic career possibilities.  Although she is not married, she states that she has seen the struggles of female professors who have families or who want to have families.  Unfortunately, the “tenure clock” does not stop for professors who have children.  She describes discrimination against women and African American instructors and homosexuals generally in the classroom, and discusses the unwillingness to commit resources to older faculty members.  Garkovich discusses the “behind the scenes” racial tensions on campus and laments the fact that there are not sufficient numbers of African American students at UK.

 Garkovich also talks about funding at UK and for higher education in Kentucky in general.  She describes her own work which is sixty percent research, twenty percent extension, and twenty percent teaching.  She discusses the sense of camaraderie and support from her colleagues, and talks about the frustrations of not having enough time to teach. 

   

92OH89 A/F 468

LORRAINE GARKOVICH

Date:  March 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Karen Baum

Length:  1 hour, 20 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

In this third interview with Lorraine Garkovich, she describes the importance of communication in her profession.  She states that communication between herself and her colleagues is constant, but that the communication between different departments is minimal.  She discusses the differences between the Sociology Department in the College of Arts and Sciences, and the Rural Sociology Department of the College of Agriculture.  Garkovich describes her committee work as a means of gaining information about the university as a whole.  She mentions her work with the UK Senate Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women and with the Rural Sociological Society.  She describes the organization of the Rural Sociology Department as being a single administrative and a single academic unit. 

Garkovich describes working with graduate students and her method of letting graduate students take a project and run with it.  She recalls incidents of working with difficult people, and explains how being single can be advantageous to someone in her career.   She discusses the rewards of her job including personal satisfaction and the responsibility that she feels towards the people of Kentucky.  She explains the stress of her work and mentions committees, deadlines, and the frustrations of knowing that things need to be done.  Garkovich describes her greatest professional achievement as just getting as far as she has.  She talks about the time commitments of her various work activities such as research, advising, teaching, and administrative work, and discusses the nature of the research on rural families, fertility, and farm women.  Garkovich talks about sources of funding for research, and describes a research project she completed with the USDA Agricultural Co-op Service.  She also discusses her teaching methods and her personal classroom style.    

 

92OH113 A/F 477

LORRAINE GARKOVICH

Date:  March 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky  

Interviewer:  Karen Baum

Length:  15 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

In this final interview with Lorraine Garkovich, she describes the importance of making classes useful to her students and her view of student evaluations as helpful to the teaching process.  She also discusses the importance of peer evaluations.  Garkovich describes changes that she would like to see in higher education in Kentucky including more cooperation between the regional university and UK.  She believes that faculty must become more creative and innovative in their teaching and she would like to see more commitment to higher education in Kentucky as a whole.

 

81OH83 A/F 140

WESLEY P. GARRIGUS

Date:  July 21, 1981

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell and Bruce Denbo

Length: 1 hour, 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Wesley P. Garrigus’s father was Chairman of Animal Husbandry at the University of Connecticut, which was the same position that Garrigus held at the University of Kentucky. Garrigus received his B.S. degree from the University of Connecticut and his Master’s and Doctorate degrees from the University of Illinois. He talks about other family members involved in the livestock industry. Garrigus was a research assistant at University of Illinois and later became the Associate State Agronomist for the Soil Conservation Service. He recalls he met Dr. E. S. Good at a meeting in Chicago, Illinois, and Dr. Good asked him to come to UK.  He talks about Good, a microbiologist trained at Michigan State, who developed a serum which immunized mares against a bacterial type of abortion. This serum was used world-wide and helped save the horse industry in Central Kentucky. Good also researched brucellosis in swine and cattle.

Garrigus talks at length about Dean Thomas Poe Cooper, and remembers his disagreements with Cooper regarding staff, including C. Oran Little and Charles Barnhart.  He discusses the early history of the land grant system and knowledge about the Experiment Station across the states. He talks about support for the College of Agriculture within UK, and recalls the differences in personality and management style between President Frank L. McVey and Dean Cooper.  Garrigus was appointed Chairman of the Animal Industries Group in the College of Agriculture in 1954, and describes the reorganization of this department. He talks about Dean Frank Welch and his political acumen, especially in building support for the university throughout the state.

Garrigus discusses the influence of outside agricultural groups, including tobacco interests and the fescue producers, which discouraged some faculty prospects from coming to UK, and hurt the farmers. He describes the problems caused by fescue foot in livestock. He talks about President John T. Oswald’s administration. Garrigus discusses the graduate programs and complications of hiring faculty today versus twenty or thirty years ago. He describes the relationship between the College of Agriculture and the horse industry in central Kentucky. He talks about role of women and black farmers and how this has changed. He mentions the use of radio broadcasts in the 1940’s by Extension Office to disseminate information to farmers.

 

85OH14 OH183 A/F 183

WESLEY P. GARRIGUS

Date:  December 7, 1978

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Wesley P. Garrigus was born in June of 1909 in Storrs, Connecticut, on the campus of the University of Connecticut. He lived there until he graduated with his Bachelor’s degree in 1931. He was doing research for his doctorate during the early 1930’s at the University of Illinois, where he met Dr. E. S. Good of the University of Kentucky at a meeting in Chicago, who offered him a position in the University of Kentucky in 1937.  By 1941, Garrigus was appointed Chairman of the Animal Industries Group at UK, which included all aspects of the livestock field. He discusses Kentucky’s agricultural and livestock history, which dates back prior to the Civil War.

Garrigus describes the major changes that have occurred in the livestock industry. He discusses at length the UK College of Agriculture’s role in the history and purpose of the land grant institution, and its support of the “three-way approach” of research, teaching and extension programs. He talks about various evaluation techniques developed to increase production with less expense. Garrigus describes what to expect in the agricultural industry over the next twenty-five years. He mentions Good’s landmark development of a vaccine for the prevention of contagious abortion in horses. Garrigus mentions Good was assisted in this research by Amanda Harms.

Garrigus mentions Henry Besuden, owner of Vinewood Farm, and a former UK basketball center. He also mentions Brownell Combs, owner of Merewood Farm. Garrigus talks about the history of the Saddle and Sirloin Club’s Portrait Gallery, which started in 1903 near the Chicago Stockyards, but was moved to the West Hall in the Executive West Hotel near the Kentucky State Fairgrounds in Louisville, Kentucky.  Garrigus’s portrait was added in 1983. He talks about his wife and family. He emphasizes that teaching and personal interaction with students is what he values the most in his job.

 

77OH73 A/F 74

CHLOE GIFFORD

Date:  October 14, 1977

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Cathy Cooper

Length:  2 hours, 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Chloe Gifford was the first female graduate of the University of Kentucky’s College of Law.  Gifford attended UK’s College of Law during the 1920s, when women were still not received well at the law school. She recalls the campus at that time, and mentions Miss Clara White, the law librarian, and Judge William T. Lafferty, Dean of the College of Law. She remembers daily activities in her classes, and notes that she was allowed to leave some of the criminal law classes if the subjects discussed were considered inappropriate for a woman. Gifford talks about Frances Jewell, Dean of Women and Ezra Gill, the Registrar. She recalls her memberships in various student organizations, including Mortarboard and Alpha Delta Pi. She talks at length about her experience of taking the Bar, a two day exam, which she passed.

Gifford earned her three degrees (A.B., J.D. and M.A.) from UK. She was Dean of Sayre School for twelve years. In 1940, President Frank L. McVey offered Gifford a position at UK designed to help promote the university. She accepted the job, later titled Director of Community Services, which was to plan, develop and implement programs and activities for groups across the state as well as encourage more students to come to UK. She mentions working with Dr. Howard Beers in the Department of Rural Sociology. Gifford helped set up a state-wide recreation program during President Herman L. Donovan’s tenure and talks about her working relationship with Donovan.

Gifford was President of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, traveled world-wide, and holds an honorary doctorate from the University of the Philippines. She talks about President Frank Dickey, and remembers the desegregation of the campus. Gifford talks about John T. Oswald and his administrative style. She describes her work style and states that she felt she worked as a “lone wolf.”  She talks about politics, and how her law degree helped her to maintain her perspective, develop her political acumen, and her well-known propensity to speak her mind when necessary. She mentions that Adolph Rupp and Kentucky basketball were known world-wide and explains how this publicity helped Kentucky. Gifford recalls that she helped with the formation of Kentucky Educational Television (KET), and that she served as the only woman on the Committee for Kentucky.  She also discusses her interaction with the students. 

 

90OH308 A/F 408

CHLOE GIFFORD

Date:  November 15, 1972

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles Talbert

Length:  1 hour, 40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Chloe Gifford was a long time friend of President Frank L. McVey and his wife Frances Jewell McVey.  Gifford was a student when Frances Jewell McVey was Dean of Women at the University of Kentucky, and recalls that Jewell was her English instructor during her freshman year at UK, and that she was completely devoted to Jewell because she took an interest in her students.  Gifford was able to become better acquainted with the McVey’s when she took a position with University Extension.

Gifford describes President Frank McVey as an intellectual, and talks about Jewell’s influence on McVey.   She mentions McVey’s first wife, Mabel, but talks at length about the Wednesday afternoon teas given by Jewell at Maxwell Place.  Gifford compares McVey to Adlai Stevenson, and recalls that McVey appeared before the Kentucky legislature to fight the passage of an anti-evolution law.  She states that few university presidents are as intellectual as McVey.  Gifford worked with President Herman L. Donovan for fifteen years, and considered him an excellent administrator and politician, but not a scholar.

Gifford remembers Eleanor Roosevelt’s visit to UK’s campus for Farm and Home Week.  Gifford recalls that President McVey introduced her as the wife of Theodore Roosevelt. She discusses Frances McVey’s battle with lung cancer, and talks about Mrs. McVey’s request that Gifford look after President McVey after she died.  Gifford continued to visit Dr. McVey once a week after Jewell’s death.  Gifford also mentions the sometime strained relationship between President McVey and Dr. Thomas D. Clark.

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Gillig - Gulley.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

93OH12 A/F 523

ANN S. GILLIG

Date:  January 26, 1993

Location:  Fayette County, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 2 hours, 45minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Ann S. Gillig was born in 1924. She talks about her parents who were from Greenup County, and her family. Her father practiced law in Pikeville, but met her mother in Cynthiana, Kentucky.  Gillig’s grandfather was Congressman Joseph Bentley Bennett. She recalls her family’s interest in politics, their political backgrounds, and the local elections.  Her father ran for the Senate several times in Pike, Floyd, and Knott counties in Kentucky. In 1941, Gillig enrolled at Ward-Belmont College.  She describes the daily routine, the social life, some of the restrictions imposed by the school, and her trips back and forth by train. When the Kentucky legislature was in session in Frankfort, Kentucky, during Governor Keen Johnson’s administration, she would visit her parents and attend the assembly balls.

Gillig left Ward-Belmont after two semesters and enrolled at the University of Kentucky. She compares the curricula of both schools. She stayed in Boyd Hall, but later pledged Delta Delta Delta and moved to the sorority house. She talks about daily life in the house and how the girls formed lifelong friendships. Gillig states that she was discouraged from majoring in Chemistry, so chose English. She talks about social life on campus during World War II, and college “hangouts” such as Joyland Park and the Canary Cottage. She mentions Sarah Holmes, Dean of Women, and Jane Haselden, who was Assistant Dean of Women.  She remembers that Holmes organized the female students to help with the war effort.   Gillig worked at the company store in Pikeville, Kentucky during the summer, which was part of the family’s coal mining business.  She recalls that while at home, Dr. Dantzler asked her to assist him on a research project concerning the Elizabethan English used in the mountain areas. 

After graduation in 1945, Gillig went to New York City for three months. She returned to live with her brother and his wife in Elkhorn City, Kentucky, where she taught English and typing for one year. Dean William Taylor called and offered her a job in the English Department at UK. Later, President Herman L. Donovan offered her a position as an assistant secretary. She talks about the duties and responsibilities of this job. She mentions Nell Donovan, President Donovan’s wife. She recalls John T. Gillig, her father-in-law, and a partner in Gillig-Merriweather-Johnson, the firm that designed Memorial Coliseum. She mentions that she is a Phi Beta Kappa. She talks about her children.

 

00OH81 A/F 610

JOHN GILLIS

Date:  October 5, 1997 or December 21, 1997

Location:  By Telephone

Interviewer:  Sharon Childs

Length: 2 hours, 45minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: Permission of Sharon Childs Required

 

 

76OH11 A/F 138

LYMAN GINGER

Date:  July 1, 1981

Location:  Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell and Bruce Denbo

Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Bruce Denbo begins this interview by reviewing some of Lyman Ginger’s accomplishments. Ginger received his Ed.D. from the University of Kentucky in 1950. He was a high school principal, coached athletics, was the Director of the University School at the University of Kentucky, and the Dean of the College of Education at the University of Kentucky. Ginger was President of the National Educational Association (NEA); he was the only person to serve two terms as well as the only person to serve from Kentucky. He served as Superintendent of Public Instruction and as Chairman of the Commission for Post-Secondary Education for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. He was a member of the Urban County Council.

Ginger describes the concept of “minimum foundation”, the re-codification of school laws and practices in 1932.  He talks at length about the necessity of changing the state constitution and how this was accomplished. He mentions individuals active in education who helped with this, including Robert Martin and Adrian Doran.  He recalls that Earle C. Clements, Governor Lawrence Wetherby, and John Sherman Cooper were also instrumental in this effort. He emphasizes that this is the most significant event in the history of public education and the history of Kentucky in the last fifty years. He talks at length about Dean William Taylor of UK’s College of Education, who was committed to education in Kentucky. Ginger recalls that Taylor encouraged his work with the Kentucky Educational Association (KEA). He mentions Horace Tate, an African-American, who received his doctoral degree from UK, and is now the Executive Secretary of the Georgia Education Association. He discusses his childhood and his education in a one-room school in rural areas of Kentucky, and states that he attended Kentucky Wesleyan. Ginger talks at length about the College of Adult and Extension in the 1940’s and how they began developed a plan that eventually became the community college system. He discusses the proper roles of teaching, research and service at a university. He compares UK Presidents Herman L. Donovan, John W. Oswald and Frank Dickey.

 

92OH143 A/F 492

JONATHAN M. GOLDING

Date:  March 9, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  K. C. Watts

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Jonathan Mark Golding is Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology in the University of Kentucky’s College of Arts and Sciences. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1959.  Golding received his B.A. in psychology from Temple University in 1981, and received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from the University of Denver in 1986.  Golding recalls that education was important to his family, and states that he feels that some sort of higher education is critical today.  He recalls how he first became interested in psychology.

Golding emphasizes the importance of post-doctoral research in his field in order to further an academic career.  He completed post-doctoral research at Memphis State before coming to UK in 1988. He describes his daily work activities in his position at UK, and the skills needed for a person in his position. Golding discusses the difficulty of publishing in his field of research psychology, and the frustrations of grant writing. Golding notes that one of the university’s greatest achievements is educating a large cross-section of the people of the state of Kentucky.  He sees the biggest problem at UK as the lack of understanding of the role of a research institution.

Golding discusses the topic of gender, race, nationality and age and how they impact career opportunities at the university. He perceives a certain element of racial tension on campus, and mentions a lecture by Spike Lee as an example. He talks about funding for higher-education in Kentucky. Golding discusses the rewards of his work, and communication within the department as well as within the college and university at large. He discusses the structure and hierarchy of his department, including the committees.

 

92OH169 A/F 507

JONATHAN M. GOLDING

Date:  Spring, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  K. C. Watts

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

In this second of a two part interview, Jonathan Golding continues the discussion of his work as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology in UK’s College of Arts and Sciences. He describes his work, including the three facets of teaching, research and service work, and how his time is divided between each of these. He talks about the benefits of traveling to conventions and conferences including networking.  Golding states that he enjoys the autonomy of his work, feels he is self-motivated, and believes in the mission of a public university. He mentions university policies, including tenure. Golding talks about the hiring practices of universities in general and the difficulty of attracting minority candidates to UK.

 

92OH83 A/F 467

BETH L. GOLDSTEIN

Date:  March 11, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Jodi Biggs

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Beth L. Goldstein is currently an Assistant Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation in the College of Education at the University of Kentucky. She was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1955, and has a husband and two children. Goldstein received her B. S. degree in Anthropology, with a specialization in Asian studies from Yale.  She received her Ph.D. in Educational Policy from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She accepted a teaching fellowship at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, and taught there for three years. Goldstein later worked as an adult education program coordinator for the refugee camps in Thailand. She states that education was very important in her family, and sees education as critical for personal development.

Goldstein enjoys teaching, and describes her activities on curriculum committees as well as with politically active student organizations that are involved with international Asian groups, educational outreach, human rights, community education, outreach, and labor education.  She discusses the traditional academic tenure track process, and notes that deviation from this method is frowned upon. She recalls her work with the World Bank in Madison, where she monitored overseas students, especially through the Indonesian government. She describes her “typical” work week, with a detailed schedule that contains a wide range of activities and responsibilities. Goldstein discusses the high expectations for faculty in College of Education. She explains that women are usually on more committees, since there are fewer women in faculty positions on campus, and describes bureaucratic work as her least favorite part of her job. 

 

92OH114 A/F 478

BETH L. GOLDSTEIN

Date:  March 30, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Jodi Biggs

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Beth L. Goldstein is currently an Assistant Professor of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation in the College of Education at the University of Kentucky, where she is up for tenure. She feels that the climate at the university has improved for women, but more progress is needed.  She notes that gender is still a factor, and there are still relatively few female faculty members.  She explains that as a result, women are expected to participate more in committee work and student interaction. She talks about the climate of harassment on campus, both gender based and racially based. Goldstein describes the campus as “parochial”, even towards people who come from outside this region of the country, and explains that international faculty and students have trouble being accepted. She talks at length about the academic environment at UK as well as her work environment. Goldstein cites the positive aspects of her job, such as autonomy in her decisions as to which projects to work on, and flexibility of scheduling.

Goldstein talks about the racial tension and homophobia that still exist on campus, her classroom experiences with this, and refers to A. B. “Happy” Chandler’s racist remarks at a Board meeting. She believes that Kentucky still does not support higher education adequately, and discusses other sources of funds. She talks extensively about benefits packages at university.  Goldstein performs external work as a research consultant with an Appalachian Education laboratory project and several school districts. She talks about administrative communication, and states that she does not think the College of Arts and Sciences communicates information well.  She describes her department, and the campus-wide pressure on faculty to focus on research rather than teaching.  Goldstein talks about her ethnographic research relating to rural families, and family literacy, cultural diversity, and multi-cultural curriculum.

 

76OH11 A/F 21

ANGUS N. GORDON

Date:  January 28, 1976

Location:  Bowling Green, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Angus N. Gordon begins this interview by discussing the problems with the honor system at the University of Kentucky while he was a student, where cheating was known to be wide-spread. Gordon recalls he had little time to participate in social activities, but was a member of the Union Philosophical and Literary Society as well as the Patterson Literary Society.  Gordon talks about being a member of the Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) just prior to World War I. He talks about the uncertainties expressed by the students regarding going to war.

Gordon discusses the relationship between the university, the student body, and the Lexington, Kentucky community. He mentions an issue when a student disappeared, possibly during a fraternity hazing incident. It was rumored that the student was killed, but nothing was ever proven, and the student was never found. Gordon discusses the library, which he thought was “more than adequate,” but was probably used more for “courting and dating than for studying”. Students were not allowed to check out books until around 1931, so they would get a card for the public library. He mentions Dr. Frank L. McVey and Frances Jewell McVey. He remembers that athletics played a large role on campus, especially football. Centre College was their biggest opponent. He talks about the fire in Dean F. Paul Anderson’s office, which destroyed the records of several players accused of being ineligible to play.

Gordon mentions that several politicians came to speak on campus, including William Jennings Bryan during the Scopes trial. He recalls that Teddy Roosevelt and then Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt spoke downtown at the train station. Gordon asked Roosevelt whether a student trained in both agriculture and ROTC should volunteer for service, an issue which was a continuous debate on campus. Roosevelt responded that agriculturally trained students should remain at home to farm. Gordon remembers that faculty positions were limited for women, but they were allowed to participate in the Home Economics Department under Miss Mary E. Sweeney. He recalls that roles were more traditional for both men and women during this time.

 

89OH37 A/F 347

DILLARD GRADY and NANCY MITCHELL

Date:  November 7, 1988

Location:  Clarkland Farm, Fayette County, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Janice Crane

Length:  45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: None

Dillard Grady and Nancy Mitchell were born in Lexington. Their father is from Lexington, Kentucky and the family farm, Clarkland Farm, in Fayette County, has been in the family since it was a land grant. Their mother is from Mt. Sterling, Kentucky. Mitchell and Grady talk about their experiences attending Sayre School and the University of Kentucky Training School.  Mitchell attended Sayre, Morton Middle School, and graduated from the University High School.  Grady recalls Sayre did not have enough students for middle school, so she attended Sayre until the fifth grade, and completed her education at the University High School through high school.  Both believe their parents chose Sayre for social more than educational reasons, plus University High utilized student teachers, so they felt the level of education would be inferior.

Grady and Mitchell both remembered that Sayre gave them a good background in English and spelling, plus more individual attention. There were no organized sports or physical education classes. They talk about school activities, including recess.  They recall an assembly for President Franklin D. Roosevelt when he died, and the Pledge of Allegiance and a prayer were said before class.  Grady and Mitchell describes differences between public and private schools.  They both remembered Sayre and University High students were considered snobs. They discuss the different teaching methods at both schools, and recall excellent student teachers at University High. They reminisce about student activities, including skipping school. Both thought highly of Dr. Lyman Ginger and Miss Anna Peck, a teacher who made history interesting. Both Grady and Mitchell attended some college at Transylvania University and UK. They talked about father, who felt women did not really need a higher education.

 

85OH99 A/F 230

JOHN F. GRAHAM

Date:  May 9, 1985

Location:  Princeton, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions: None

John F. Graham, a former county agent with UK’s Extension Service, explains how different extension is today from when he started in the field in the 1920s.  Graham was born in 1901 in Calloway County, Kentucky. He attended county public schools and graduated from Murray High School in Murray, Kentucky. He earned his B.S. degree in Agriculture from the University of Kentucky. He mentions early experiences with the Cooperative Extension Service and 4-H Club in high school, especially 4-H summer camps, under J. V. Gardner, the first County Agent in Calloway County.

Graham served as Assistant County Agent in Mason and Caldwell Counties in Kentucky, and as County Agent in Caldwell County at UK’s Princeton Sub-Station from 1924 until 1947. He talks at length about the conditions in rural areas during the 1920’s and 1930s. Graham recalls that the Caldwell County Extension Service was instrumental in developing a rural electrification program in this area.

Graham explains Type 23 fire-cured tobacco was the major source of cash income until the tobacco market collapsed in 1931, and the Eastern Dark-Fired Tobacco Association was formed in 1932.  He talks about the early years of the agricultural economy in Kentucky, and emphasizes that the lack of communication, low level of education, reluctance to change, and the “show me” attitude of farmers slowed their early efforts.    He describes the Extension’s assistance with improvements to the county school system.

Graham recalls that there was no adequate farm credit during the late 1920s, so the Western Kentucky Production Credit Association was formed.  Graham was a charter member of the Caldwell County Farm Bureau, which was formed in 1934. Graham talks about the charter meeting in Hopkinsville, Kentucky that established the Production Credit Association. He recalls that the Federal Land Bank was reactivated in 1934, and the Soil Conservation District was organized in Caldwell County in the early 1940’s. He talks about the history of UK’s Experiment Station at Princeton. Graham also recalls his involvement in professional organizations, describes satisfying and dissatisfying experiences, and mentions his wife, family and church activities. Graham worked for Liberty National Bank and Trust of Louisville, Kentucky from 1952 until he retired in 1967.

 

92OH81 A/F 465

LOUISE GRAHAM

Date:  March 9, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Elizabeth Carr

Length: 25 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Louis Graham is a Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky. She was born in Beeville, Texas in 1943. In 1961, she attended the University of Texas, where she studied  Latin-American Studies, and earned her B. A. in 1965. She later earned her J. D., and also holds a teacher’s certificate. Graham received the Great Teacher Award from the UK Alumni Association. She talks about her decision to choose a law career, and recalls her work as a law clerk for the United States Court Appeals for the Fifth Circuit in Texas.  She came to Kentucky in 1978 after she decided to become a law professor.  Graham states she was impressed with UK’s Law School, and its emphasis on teaching and more contact with students. Graham talks about the day to day responsibilities of her position, including teaching, class preparation, and student advising. She describes at length the importance of class preparation.

Graham discusses her schedule as a university professor, and mentions her pro bono work.  Graham notes that if someone wants to be a lawyer, they need to like writing and dealing with people. She sees her roles as one of counselor, negotiator, and advocate. Graham believes the greatest achievement of any university “is to produce graduates that are intelligent, motivated, and committed to making this a better state to live in.”  Graham would like see a university policy that places the emphasis on teaching. She thinks race as well as gender influences academic career possibilities, and mentions the Women’s Report as proof of this.  She also discusses the state funding for higher-education.

 

92OH165 A/F 503

LOUISE GRAHAM

Date:  April 15, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Elizabeth Carr

Length: 20 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

This is the second interview with Louise Graham, Professor of Law at the University of Kentucky.  In 1973, Graham enrolled in law school at the University of Texas, and graduated with a J. D.  Her mother was a housewife who sometimes worked outside the home, and her father was a banker.  She describes her work environment, the working conditions of her department, and how her salary reflects her responsibilities.  Graham states that she does consulting work and has taken one sabbatical leave. Graham talks about the influence of age, gender, and race on careers at the university. Graham discusses the importance of communication with colleagues and the university, and states that gender, race, and age can affect communication.

She describes the administrative structure of her department, and how conflict is resolved. She talks about her personal life and how it impacts her work, emotionally and financially, since she has two elderly parents and a daughter. Graham discusses her personal and professional extracurricular activities. She feels her greatest personal achievement is that she “has taught almost a whole generation of Kentucky lawyers about family law.”  Graham explains that she is writing a book on Kentucky domestic relations, and currently researching the development of family court and marital property law. She talks about teaching and her teaching philosophy.  She feels her most important work has been in the development of the family court system in the state of Kentucky.

 

89OH38 A/F 348

JOSEPH C. GRAVES and GARDNER TURNER

Date:  November 3, 1988

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Janice Crane

Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Gardner L. Turner and Joseph C. Graves both attended the University School at the University of Kentucky.  Turner was born in Louisville, Kentucky, but his family moved back to Lexington, Kentucky in 1935.  Graves was born in Lexington in 1930. Turner attended Jefferson Davis Elementary, Sayre School, and the University School at the University of Kentucky. Graves began his education at the University School in kindergarten. Graves recalls teachers at the University School, including Miss Kitty Conroy and Anna B. Peck. Both Graves and Turner feel that their parents sent them to University School because it was considered “progressive,” since student teachers generally used the newest theories and practices. They both discuss the differences in theoretical practices and methodology between Sayre School and the University School.

Graves and Turner discuss, from their perspective as parents, why people choose public or private school for their children. They describe extracurricular activities at both types of schools. Graves recalls, due to gas rationing, parochial and private students were allowed to ride the public school buses, especially students living in the country. Graves talks about the perception of the community regarding the University School. He discusses the more relaxed, less disciplined environment at the University School versus the more structured environment of Sayre, which was labeled as a school for rich children. Both Graves and Turner agree that the focus of the University School was “a well-rounded educational experience.”  Graves sent his three children to Montessori schools in Lexington.  Turner enrolled his daughter at University School until it was closed during President John T. Oswald’s tenure, then she attended Sayre instead.

 

79OH135 A/F 106

GEORGE GRIDER

Date:  May 2, 1979

Location:  Danville, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Dwayne Cox

Length: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Poor

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

George Grider is a pharmacist in Danville, Kentucky. He graduated from the Louisville College of Pharmacy in 1940, which is now the College of Pharmacy at the University of Kentucky. He was born in Albany, Kentucky in 1914. In 1920, the family moved to Monticello, Kentucky, where he attended Monticello Grade School and graduated from Monticello High School in 1932. He recalls the fire in “1928” that burned down both the Monticello Drug Company and the Ramsey Hotel. Grider later worked in the Monticello Drug Store, and credits this experience with his choice of career. He attended Morehead State Teacher’s College, now Morehead State University, on a state scholarship program, and worked at the drugstore in Morehead while in school.

Grider recalls his decision to become a pharmacist. He worked for Mr. Kranz, who was on Board of Trustees at the College of Pharmacy for several months. He describes his experiences while attending pharmacy school during the Louisville Flood of 1937. He talks at length about Dean Earl P. Sloan. After graduation, Grider worked at pharmacies in Richmond and Danville, Kentucky. He applied for the Navy Medical Corps in Louisville, Kentucky, but was commissioned as a deck officer in 1942. He talks at length about his experiences in the Pacific Theater during World War II, and said they were invaluable in teaching him how to get along with people. He opened his own pharmacy in Danville after the war. He discusses the Kentucky Board of Pharmacies, on which he served from 1957 to 1959.

Grider discusses at length the history of the Ephraim McDowell House and the restoration of the building, with assistance from the Kentucky Pharmaceutical Association and Eli Lily. He mentions George Griffenhagen, a pharmaceutical historian from the Smithsonian, who convinced Sydney Blumberg to contribute his collection of antique apothecary ware, which was later purchased to help restore the Apothecary Shop at McDowell House.  In 1959, Grider was admitted to the State Board of Pharmacy.  Grider eventually became President of the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy (AIHP).

 

02OH50 A/F 633

JACK F. GRON

Date:  June 26, 2002

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Gail Kennedy

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

In this interview, Jack F. Gron discusses his work with John Tuska, former Professor of Art at the University of Kentucky. Gron was born in Steubenville, Ohio in 1951. His family worked in the steel industry, which influenced his choice of becoming a metal sculptor. He earned his B. F. A. from Columbus College of Art and Design in 1973, and his M.F.A. from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He moved to Chicago, where he had a studio and taught part-time. In 1980, he moved to the University of Cincinnati to teach sculpture for two years. Gron came to UK in 1982, and first met John Tuska when moving into the metal arts facility. He describes Tuska as a “powerful presence,” and talks about Tuska’s work in many different media.

Gron recalls that Tuska was a strong influence and role model in the art department.  He recalls how he and Tuska both learned from one another, and that Tuska helped him to deal with the politics of the department. Gron emphasizes that artists need to have an ego, which Tuska “had in abundance,” and could back it up with his prolific work. He remembered Tuska was compassionate, but expected a lot from himself as well as his students. 

Gron describes at length the development of Tuska’s best known bronze sculpture work “Illumine,” sponsored by the Donovan Trust. He discusses Tuska’s declining health during the completion of this project. Gron talks about the tremendous opportunity for students as well as himself to assist with Tuska’s work, and recalls the controversy that surrounded this piece, since the figures were nude. He also mentions working with Tuska on the bust of John Sherman Cooper, which is displayed in the State Capitol building in Frankfort, Kentucky.  Gron talks about his social interaction with Tuska and his wife, Miriam, away from the university. Miriam died in 1996 and John Tuska died in 1998.

 

85OH217 A/F 276

CHARLES GULLEY

Date:  October 1, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Charles Hendron Gulley was born in1922, at Camp Dick Robinson in Garrard County, Kentucky. He earned his B.S. degree in Agriculture from the University of Kentucky, and did a limited amount of graduate work. He states that “grew up in an extension family”, as one of six children, on a 160-acre farm in Garrard County.  His parents were both raised in Madison County, Kentucky, but spent their lives in Garrard County. Gulley recalls that in 1920, his mother read about the new UK Extension programs and wrote to the university, where she asked for a County Agent to come to Garrard County in order to set up youth programs.

Gulley states that he served with the Army Air Force during World War II.  He then spent his entire extension career in Fayette County, Kentucky. Gulley was Assistant County Agent for 4-H in Fayette County between 1949 and 1955. He recalls the county’s 4-H program, and describes the changes in the Fayette County and central Kentucky over his career. Gulley talks at length about the “farmer/banker tours” through which extension agents traveled to other states to observe new or different farming methods and machinery. He recalls that the practice of baling tobacco in Kentucky began after a visit to North Carolina.  He also describes the use of MH-30 (maleic hydrazide) on tobacco. From 1966 until 1967, Gulley was Area Agent as a Weed Specialist. He talks about the problems with the Area System and how it affected morale.

In 1969, Gulley accepted the position of Assistant to Dean Charles Barnhart of UK’s College of Agriculture.  He talks about the duties and responsibilities of this position, and the early work of county agents to gain the acceptance of farmers. Gulley describes the Extension Council system at the county, district, and state levels. He mentions the Fayette County Purebred Breeders’ Association, later the Livestock Improvement Association, formed by Ed Parker in the 1930’s and 1940’s.  He also mentions Parker’s development of a civil service retirement program for county agents.  He mentions specialists and agents who helped build a solid extension program in Kentucky, including Conrad Feltner, E. S. Good, Bob Wiggington, and Jack McClure. He talks about his wife and family, many of whom are active in extension work.  He mentions his professional awards and memberships.

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