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A Guide to the Research: "Must Reads"

Presents research literature and other sources of information about first generation college students, focusing on four-year undergraduate and graduate school experiences.

Recently Added

* Ward, Lee; Michael J. Siegel; and Zebulun Davenport. First-generation college students: Understanding and Improving the Experience from Recruitment to Commencement. San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, 2012. 147 pages.
Contents: 1. Who Are First-Generation Students? 2. Transition into College 3. Transition Through College 4. Class, Culture, Race, and Ethnicity 5. Transforming How We Work with First-Generation Students 6. A Holistic Approach to Student Success.

Items of Particular Interest

* Bryan, Elizabeth Ann. Family involvement: impacts on post-secondary educational success for first-generation Appalachian students. University of Kentucky, 2007. Young Library - Theses 5th Floor Stacks

* Chase, Sarah M. First-generation faculty: A phenomenological exploration of their motivations for mentoring first-generation students. University of Northern Colorado, 2010, 219 pages.
Institutions of higher education can create more welcoming and success-promoting environments for first-generation students by helping them connect with faculty, particularly through mentoring relationships. This research explored the motivations of faculty from first-generation backgrounds who mentored first-generation college students within the federally-funded Ronald E. McNair Postbaccalaureate Achievement Program. The five primary themes include: illustrations of teaching and mentoring, first-generation status, inspirations for mentoring, strategies for mentoring, and challenges in academe.

* D'Allegro, Mary Lou and Stefanie Kerns, Is There Such a Thing as Too Much of a Good Thing When It Comes to Education? Reexamining First Generation Student Success, Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, Vol. 12, issue 3 (2010-2011),  pp. 293-317.
Data mining and statistical analyses at a less selective institution reveal that the relationships between parents' educational level and some first year success indicators are not linear. Mathematics SAT, Critical Reading SAT, placement tests, first semester credits attempted, first semester credits earned, first semester GPA, and one-year retention means among students grouped by five parent education levels are assessed.

* Harvey, Vickie L. and Teresa Heinz Housel, eds. Faculty and First-Generation College Students: Bridging the Classroom Gap Together. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2011. Available in the Education Library: LC148.2 .F338 2011.  Center for the Enhancement of Learning & Teaching (CELT) in the Science LibraryLC148.2 .F338 2011 (Note: Restricted accessin CELT: faculty & graduate students only.)

* Jehangir, Rashne Rustom. Higher Education and First-Generation Students: Cultivating Community, Voice, and Place for the New Majority. Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. In the Education Library: LC4069.6 .J44 2010.

* Johnson, Lacey. At the U. of Kentucky, First-Generation Freshmen Get a Residence of Their Own, Chronicle of Higher Education, Vol. 58 Issue 16 (December 9, 2011), pp. A19-A20.
The article discusses the First Scholars program at the University of Kentucky, which focuses on providing support services to first-generation college students by providing them with a tuition scholarship and presenting them with the option of living in a dormitory exclusively for first-generation freshman. Particular focus is given to the emphasis on support initiatives such as field trips, tutoring services, and seminars on college life provided to students who are part of the program.

* Lumina Foundation for Education. Calculating Cost-Return for Investments in Student Success, 2010.
In late 2007, Jobs for the Future (JFF), working with the Delta Project on Postsecondary Costs, Productivity and Accountability, launched "Investing in Student Success", a one-year pilot program. The pilot, conceived of as part of the "Making Opportunity Affordable" initiative and funded by Walmart Foundation and Lumina Foundation for Education, focused on exploring whether first-year programs designed to retain students are a cost-effective investment for colleges and universities. JFF and the Delta Project recruited 13 colleges and universities to participate in Investing in Student Success. Each institution had student success programs considered effective at serving freshman students, especially low-income, first-generation, at-risk college students. The project's goal was to develop, test, and standardize tools that document the relationship between program costs and student results. The feature product of the pilot is the ISS Cost-Return Calculator, a tool that can help campus and program administrators compare the costs of student success programs to the programs' impact on student retention.

* Mehta, Sanjay S., John J. Newbold and Matthew A. O'Rourke. Why do first-generation students fail? College Student Journal, vol. 45, issue 1 (March 2011), pp. 20-35.Previous studies have determined factors contributing to first-generation student success. This study finds that first-generation students are less involved, have less social and financial support, and do not show a preference for active coping strategies. First-generation students report less social and academic satisfaction as well as lower grade point average.

* Peabody, Michael, Neal H. Hutchens, Wayne D. Lewis, and Matthew Deffendall. First-Generation College Students at the University of Kentucky. Policy Analysis Center for Kentucky Education (PACKE). 2011.
First-generation college students (FGCS) have been shown to graduate at lower rates than their continuing-generation counterparts even after controlling for other variables. We will attempt to examine the characteristics of FGCS and determine initiatives the University of Kentucky might enact in order to increase the graduation rates for this segment of the student population. In doing so we will discuss “promising practices” in student retention, examine programs designated by UK’s Top-20 plan as benchmark institutions, and submit a series of recommendations to better serve FGCS at the University of Kentucky.

* Ward, Lee; Michael J. Siegel; and Zebulun Davenport. First-generation college students: Understanding and Improving the Experience from Recruitment to Commencement. San Francisco : Jossey-Bass, 2012. 147 pages.
Contents: 1. Who Are First-Generation Students? 2. Transition into College 3. Transition Through College 4. Class, Culture, Race, and Ethnicity 5. Transforming How We Work with First-Generation Students 6. A Holistic Approach to Student Success.