This is the "UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Hackensmith - Irvin" page of the "Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: H - L" guide.
Alternate Page for Screenreader Users
Skip to Page Navigation
Skip to Page Content

Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: H - L  

This guide will help you find primary source oral history interviews pertaining to the history of the University of Kentucky, faculty and alumni.
Last Updated: Aug 28, 2013 URL: http://libguides.uky.edu/SCOHWethingtonHM Print Guide Email Alerts

UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Hackensmith - Irvin Print Page
  Search: 
 
 

Guide to the Charles T. Wethington UK Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Hackensmith - Hatch.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

76OH12 A/F 22

C.W. HACKENSMITH

Date:  July, 1975

Location:  Richmond, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Jack Adams and Peggy Standard

Length: 40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Poor

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

C.W. Hackensmith was a professor of physical education at the University of Kentucky in the early twentieth century.  He mentions Dr. Martha Carr of the Department of Physical Education, who came to the university in 1949.  He talks about physical education professors at Western Kentucky University and Eastern Kentucky University.  Hackensmith describes how the UK Athletic Department broke off from the Physical Education Department in 1929.  He recalls President Donovan’s push starting in 1938 to put UK’s athletics on the map.  He mentions “Bear” Bryant and Adolph Rupp.  Hackensmith remembers that basketball began on UK’s campus in 1903 and was started by W.H. Mustang.  He mentions Coach Shively from the University of Illinois. Hackensmith recalls having students from different sections of Kentucky and the difference between these students.  He also talks about the role of women in the Department of Physical Education. 

 

88OH220 A/F 334

LOUIS L. HAGGIN

Date:  October 17, 1988

Location:  Versailles, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Janice Crane

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Louis L. Haggin, the owner of Sycamore Farm in Woodford County, Kentucky, was born in California in 1935. He states that his family moved back to Kentucky around 1939, but since his father was in the service, his early schooling was interrupted.  He attended kindergarten at the University of Kentucky Training School in Lexington, Kentucky, and recalls his teacher, Miss Stella Gibb.  His family then moved to Lawton, Oklahoma, and finally back to Kentucky. In 1944, Haggin began his studies at Sayre School in Lexington, Kentucky, where he attended through the seventh grade.

Haggin talks briefly about the history of Sayre School, which was established by David Sayre, a silversmith, with the help of the Presbyterian Church. He talks about past headmasters, and remembers his parent’s decision to send him to Sayre School.  Haggin discusses at length Sayre’s curriculum, small classes, sports, and daily school activities. He recalls that most of the students were from Lexington or surrounding areas.  He explains the importance of the honor system at the school, and describes the dress code.  Haggin remembers that the teachers were older, but attentive and interested in the children’s education.  He talks about his teacher Ms. Yancy Withrow Adams in particular.  He also describes the women’s college which was a part of the Sayre School until women began to be accepted into Transylvania College and the University of Kentucky.   After the seventh grade, Haggin attended prep school at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, from which he graduated in 1954.  Haggin also talks about his children, whom he sent to elite schools, and his family’s history of dyslexia. 

 

85OH43 A/F 201

JEAN HAM

Date:  February 25, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  50 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Jean Ham was born in Alabama in 1925.  She attended Auburn University where she received her Bachelor of Science degree in Home Economics Education.  She later received her Master of Science Degree from the University of Kentucky.  She states that her family was a strong extension family.  She explains that she was originally interested in teaching Home Economics when the State Leader in Home Economics in Alabama asked her if she was interested in going into extension.  In January of 1949, Ham went to Troy, Alabama where she stayed until the end of 1950.  Ham married and moved to Texas with her husband and she worked in Texas as a Home Demonstration Agent until 1954.  Her husband was transferred to Kentucky, and Ham secured a position as a Home Demonstration Agent in Madison County, Kentucky.  In 1957, she worked for three months as the acting Home Furnishing Specialist, and in 1958 she became the Extension Home Economist in Fayette County.  In 1977, Ham took the position of Area Director from which she retired in July of 1982.

Ham describes her work in Madison County and states that she also had responsibility for the girls’ 4-H program.  She describes the move to Fayette County, and states hat living conditions in Fayette County were excellent.  She explains that Fayette County had separate city and county governments at the time, and that the city and county extension work were separate programs.  Ham states that the strongest area in Fayette County at that time was in home furnishing.  She describes the homemaker’s clubs that met in the evenings as more women began going into the labor force.

Ham talks about the different activities involved in extension work including leadership training, and working with the media.  She states that one of the best things for the local agent to do is to answer the many telephone calls that come into the office.  Ham served for five years as an Area Extension Director.  She talks about the challenges of supervising extension personnel, and describes working with extension agents and lay leaders to get county appropriations.  She states that it requires a lot of finesse to work with county fiscal courts. 

Ham states that a priority in extension work is having a good sound programs.  She states that she pushed for excellence, but did not think that she should visit an office without people knowing.  She describes how professional groups, like the American Home Economists Association, provided her with the opportunity to be associated in a professional way with other home economists. 

 

76OH62 A/F 62

CAROLYN HAMMER

Date:  July 8, 1976

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Bill Marshall

Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Carolyn Hammer is the founder of the King Library Press.  She defines the meaning of the small press, and talks about the establishment of the King Library Press.  She states that she does not approve of the term private press.  She describes her student help in the press mentioning one from Jordan and several library science students.  Hammer explains that they originally called the King Library Press, the High Noon press since the librarians worked in the press during their lunch hour.  She recalls their first wooden press, and talks about the first book printed in the basement of the King Library.

Hammer talks about the various presses used in the King Library Press and the books that they have printed.  She specifically mentions a Wendell Berry book, a reprint of rhymes from a novel by John Jacob Niles, and The Seafarer.  Hammer talks about the printing process itself including the spacing of letters.  She explains that Lawrence Thompson, the Director of the Library was very interested in their work at the press.  Hammer mentions the difficulties in getting replacement parts, and how humidity can affect the printing process.  She also states that the press is a great training ground for librarians.    

 

85OH01 A/F 171

LUCY HAMMOND

Date:  December 7, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour, 5 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Lucy Hammond was born in Junction City, Kentucky on June 16, 1927.  She received her Bachelor of Science degree from Kentucky State College and a Master’s degree in Community Development from the University of Louisville.  She also holds certificates in community development and food and nutrition.  Hammond states that she knew that she wanted to work with cooperative extension from the time that she was nine. 

Hammond worked in dietetics for sixteen years before applying for UK Cooperative Extension Service.  She first held a position in Food and Nutrition for the Bluegrass.  In this position she began to link up with other volunteer organization and work with extension families.  She talks about working with churches, especially the Unitarian Church.  Hammond helped to found the Neighborly Organization of Women, and she talks about food stamp projects and helping people in basic family resource management.

In March of 1970, she was appointed State Coordinator of Food and Nutrition Programs.  She explains that her objective was to work with families mainly on a one-to-one basis.  She talks about taking extension programs to the people and the two mobile education units that they had in the state of Kentucky.  She feels that throughout her fifteen years, she has been able to teach 62,000 families.

Hammond explains the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program (FNAP) which operates in the same regions as other extension program.  She also talks about her work in Kenya from 1980 until 1983 and the young man from Uganda who is living with her.  She explains that her job in Kenya was to teach in the College of Home Economics and she explains some of the challenges Kenya was facing at that time.  Hammond mentions other volunteer agencies that she has been involved with including the Shriners, the Salvation Army, and the United Way.  She talks about professional groups in which she is involved including Epsilon Sigma Phi, the American Dietetics Association, the International Federation of Home Economists, and the National Council of Negro Women. 

 

91OH104 A/F 445

AMELIA LIGON HARKEY

Date:  May 16, 1991

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Amelia Ligon Harkey was born in Owensboro, Kentucky in 1913.  Her father was a high school science teacher, and he succeeded Cotton Noe as Head of the University Training School at the University of Kentucky in 1913.  Later, the family moved to Henderson, Kentucky in 1919 when her father became Superintendent in Henderson, Kentucky.  Her father later became principal of a high school in Ashland, Kentucky.  Harkey talks about her family, and a family farm outside of Owensboro, where she would spend the summer.  She describes her mother, “a most unusual woman” who invested in the stock market successfully, loved to teach, and earned her Master’s degree from UK. 

Harkey was a member of the first graduating class from Henry Clay High School in Lexington, Kentucky.  She recalls that Jacqueline Bull, the first head of UK’s Special Collections, was in her class.  Harkey states that she entered the University of Kentucky when she was sixteen years old, and attended the university while living at home. She pledged Kappa Delta sorority and “socialized a lot” her freshman year.   She recalls that although she majored in Home Economics, she was really interested in Journalism, but even “more interested in boys.”  Harkey talks about several instructors and fellow students.

Harkey worked briefly at the UK Agricultural Experiment Station, but states that she did not want to teach.  Harkey remembers her father’s friendship with Ezra Gillis, UK’s first Registrar.  She reminisces at length about President Herman L. Donovan, and his wife, Nell, who were her aunt and uncle.  She talks about family picnics, teas and receptions, at Maxwell Place, as well as a visit by Eleanor Roosevelt. Harkey mentions controversy over Lincoln bedroom furniture used by the Donovans at Maxwell Place because the furniture was not given to UK.  Harkey married in 1935, and moved to Tennessee.  Harkey was a homemaker for many years, and states that she never wanted to work outside of the home. She talks about her family and her return to Lexington after she divorced.

 

77OH08 A/F 51

REBEKAH HARLESTON and MARTHA JANE WHITESIDE

Date:  December 15, 1976

Location:  M. I. King Library, Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:                     

Length:  20 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Martha Jane Whiteside and Rebekah Harleston recall working in the University of Kentucky library beginning in 1946.  They mention Margaret I. King who would complete the final inspection of all catalogued books, and recall visits by President Frank L. McVey to the library.  They describe the Margaret I. King library building and recall the open land where the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library (formerly King North Building) is now located.  Harleston and Whiteside mention the rumors that the library sat above a cave, and talk about the basement of the library as a “dungeon.”  They also remember day to day situations in the library and the location of various materials.

Whiteside and Harleston recall that only faculty and graduates with permits were allowed to use the Congressional Record. They discuss the organization of the Reference Room and the location of various study areas such as the Graduate Reading Room.  Whiteside and Harleston mention the collecting efforts of Dr. Thomas D. Clark, who gathered materials from various places such as Centre College, Transylvania University, and Kentucky State College.  They also describe how Clark rescued state records and Court of Appeals decisions.

Whiteside and Harleston discuss the weekly schedule for the library, and recall changes in the hours that librarians were expected to work.  They state that there was only one telephone in the building and that it was located in Ms. King’s office.  They mention the book budget and staffing, and talk about the increase in the student population after World War II. They mention the need for thriftiness and paper recycling. They reminisce about favorite reference questions, library humor, and having to cut the pages of new books.  They recall that in 1947 the acquisitions department had three full-time people, several students and an accounts clerk, and state that the library staff always sent Ms. King a dozen American Beauty roses on her birthday.

 

78OH47 A/F 88

WILLIAM D. HARRELL

Date:  May 26, 1978

Location:  Muncie, Indiana

Interviewer:  William Cooper

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Poor (Technical Problems)

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

William D. Harrell is the head basketball coach of Muncie Central High School in Muncie, Indiana.  He attended Kentucky Wesleyan University in Owensboro, Kentucky. He earned his B.A. in History, but minored in Physical Education.  Harrell received his Master’s degree from the University of Kentucky in 1963. He talks about his teachers, his instruction, and his experiences at both Kentucky Wesleyan and UK. He did not recall any black students in his classes. Harrell was aware of just one black instructor for his correspondence course in Sociology, who he never met. He discusses at length the recruiting situation with black basketball players.  He recalls the perception that highly recruited white players came to UK because there would be no black players.

Harrell talks about his love for basketball as a child and his decision as a teenager to become a basketball coach. He mentions Lester Norton Ralph Carlisle and Earl Jones, high school basketball coaches who ran excellent programs at the time.  In the mid-1960s, Harrell became the basketball coach at Shelby County High School.  They won the State Championship in 1966. He mentions players Mike Casey and Terry Davis. Harrell talks about a black player, Scott Jones, who transferred to Shelby County from Lincoln Institute.  Harrell left Shelby County to become an Assistant Coach at the University of Nebraska for the two years. In 1970, he accepted the head coaching position at Morehead State University, where he stayed for five years. He talks at length about disagreements over scheduling, a controversial game with Illinois State University, and his decision to come to Muncie Central in 1974. He discusses the organization of state basketball tournaments in Kentucky and Indiana and teaching qualifications for the coaches.  He emphasizes that, although some are perhaps born with the talent, anyone that wants to be a basketball coach and works hard at it can succeed.

 

85OH146 A/F 255

ERNEST L. HARRIS

Date:  June 28, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Ernest Leo Harris was born in 1981 in Madison County, Kentucky. He graduated from high school in Richmond, Kentucky, attended Eastern Kentucky University for two years and completed his B. S. degree at the University of Kentucky in 1941. He recalls J. Lester Miller, Madison County Extension Agent. He remembers his early experiences with UK’s Cooperative Extension, especially 4-H Club activities. Harris credits UK’s College of Agriculture for showing people how and where to get the information they needed. He worked for Swift and Company in Chicago, Illinois after serving in the army.

Harris returned to Oldham County, Kentucky in 1946 to help run a general farm operation with his father-in-law, and used horses to plow before purchasing tractor and other farm machinery. He credits UK’s Extension Services for assistance with improvements in crop production, as well as feeding, breeding, and management of his livestock. He emphasizes that computers are a good working tool for his business, but no substitute for his education in math. Harris remembers his work with the Governor’s Blueprint Committee, and mentions his awards and his memberships in various organizations and associations. Harris notes the decline in the number of small farmers but does not believe that big cooperative farms are more efficient. He talks about the Kentucky Farm Bureau and various conservation practices for farming.

Harris discusses some of the changes and problems occurring in the county while he served as Vice-President of the Oldham County Planning and Zoning Committee. He remembers County Agents whom he has worked with over the years and the importance of these contacts. He emphasizes the importance of Extension’s role in showing farmers the “how” as well as the “why” in solving their problems. Harris discusses State and County fairs and his work with judging teams at the state, county, and university level. He recalls satisfying and dissatisfying experiences. Harris talks about his wife, Dorothy Agnes Fuller, as well as his family. Harris was the recipient of UK’s Thomas Poe Cooper Award in 1965 and Distinguished Alumni Award in 1983.

 

92OH90 A/F 469

STEPHEN M. HART

Date:  March 24, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Jessica Weiss

Length: 55 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Stephen M. Hart is Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Kentucky. Hart was born in London, England in 1959. He mentions his wife, Danielle, their three children, and other family members. Hart attended Cambridge University, England from 1977 to 1985, and earned his undergraduate degrees in Spanish and French and his Ph.D. in Medieval and Modern Languages with an emphasis in Spanish. He mentions holding several jobs while in college.  He discusses the differences between the American and British school system, stating that more Americans attend college.  Hart lectured at the University of London, Queen Mary and Westfield College from 1984 to 1991. When Hart learned this site was being shut down and relocated, he applied for an available position at UK, where he had been a visiting professor.  He began working at UK in 1991.

Hart discusses his daily routine, including his teaching load and time spent with students. He talks about his preference for research, and discusses the qualities he feels teachers need. He mentions his work in Literary Theory, Feminist Literary Theory, and Women’s Writing. Hart notes that most people are surprised when they learn this, since he is a man. He discusses the difficulties of his position, and talks about his work environment.  He talks about his salary and benefits. Hart finds his work fulfilling in terms of “bringing together his teaching with his research.”  Hart recently received a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) award to study Nahuatl, a native Aztecan language, in Puebla, Mexico, and states that he has been invited to Peru to lecture.

 

92OH91 A/F 470

STEPHEN M. HART

Date:  March, 1992

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Jessica Weiss

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

This is the second interview with Stephen M. Hart, Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Kentucky.  He discusses the importance of communication between colleagues in the teaching process and with the students. Hart explains the process of disseminating information through the department and the college including outside information regarding the Hispanic culture.  Hart describes how his work affects his family, and talks about his hobbies and other activities outside of work. He states that he tries to make his professional and personal life harmonious.

Hart states that he enjoys teaching and publishing, which he feels helps others and keeps him going. Hart would like his research to have an impact on university circles, and would like to be known for teaching “good and interesting courses.”  Hart talks about rewarding and stressful situations at work, and how his time is distributed between research, teaching, advising, and administrative work. Hart discusses his other professional options before he decided to come to UK. He states that he hopes to be promoted to full professor and to make an important contribution to research in the next ten years. Hart mentions his current research projects and his current class load. He discusses the importance of education, especially higher education.

 

75OH39 A/F 09

ELLIS F. HARTFORD

Date:  November 19, 1975

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles Hay

Length: 4 hours

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Ellis F. Hartford was born in Ohio County, Kentucky. He enrolled in Kentucky Wesleyan for one year, but hurt his knee playing football. He decided to move to Whiting, Indiana, where he worked in the foundries. He later came back to Kentucky and finished his second year at Bowling Green State Normal College.  Hartford recalls the evolution debate in Kentucky and states that President Frank McVey of the University of Kentucky defended the university’s right to teach science. He remembers his parents’ concern that William Jennings Bryant was leading discussions on evolution around the state.

Hartford held several teaching positions in Kentucky and Tennessee while finishing his education.  He earned his Master’s degree from the University of Kentucky in 1934.  He later received a Rosemont Fellowship and a year’s leave from his work with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) to attend Harvard University and pursue his Doctorate.  The bombing of Pearl Harbor occurred while Hartford was at Harvard.  He became Director and Associate Professor of Secondary Education at the University School at UK in 1942, and then received his commission as a lieutenant in the navy, where he served from 1943-1946.

Hartford discusses the salary limitations in place when he returned to Kentucky after the war. He talks about his work with the Bureau of Instruction and as Executive Secretary of the Council on Public Higher Education between 1962 and 1964.  He mentions that the Foundation Program for Public Higher Education was formed in 1963. He talks at length about development of Kentucky’s community college system and some of the technical programs that were implemented. Hartford was the first Dean of the Kentucky’s community college system. He mentions the Kentucky Community College Act of 1962, which created Kentucky’s community colleges under the supervision of UK.  Hartford also talks about the college population explosion of the 1960’s, and notes changes in students’ attitudes over the years.

 

85OH49 A/F 205

ELLIS F. HARTFORD

Date:  April 25, 1979

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  1 hour

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Ellis Ford Hartford is a 1947 graduate of the University of Kentucky, former Dean of the University school, and Dean of the community college system. He was born in 1905 in Fordsville, Kentucky in Ohio County. Hartford hurt his knee playing football at Kentucky Wesleyan, so he chose to try working in the oil refineries near Hammond and Gary, Indiana.  He recalls that he stayed only a week. He returned to Kentucky and received his teacher’s certificate at Bowling Green State Normal School. 

Hartford describes the differences between when he first began teaching and now, and explains his view of what being a “professional” entails. Hartford recalls a 1908 law which required separate high schools and eliminated the one-room school system.  He discusses early efforts at commercial education and vocational classes as early as 1910 and 1920. Hartford explains the emphasis he placed on understanding grammar in English before applying it to foreign languages and his practical approaches towards this concept for both teachers and students.

Hartford remembers the bureaucracy of the United States Department of Education. He recalls his first visit to UK. He remembers when William S. Taylor, a native Ohio Countian and an employee of the first Federal Board of Vocational Education, was appointed Dean of Education in 1923. Hartford recalls the planning for the new College of Education building under Taylor and President Frank L. McVey, now called the Taylor Education Building. He mentions members of the original College of Education staff, including James Taylor Cotton Noe and Carsey Hammonds. Hartford describes the Bureau of School Service and its role in equalizing funding for county schools. He also discusses UK’s University School, and talks about the formation of Kentucky’s community college system. He mentions individuals who helped to improve education at the local, state, and national level, and talks about his family. Hartford discusses the current social problems associated with teaching and the qualities needed to be a caring, professional educator.

 

89OH273 A/F 384

JANE HASELDEN

Date:  October 17, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  First Draft

Restrictions: None

Dr. Jane Haselden was born in 1903 in Lancaster, Kentucky. Both of her parents were from Garrard County, Kentucky. Her father was of Scottish descent and a farmer. Her mother “always had a good horse” and studied photography. She recalls the education of various family members. She mentions the Nightriders and the Kentucky Tobacco Wars in Garrard County. Haselden graduated from Hamilton College in Virginia and attended Transylvania University. She notes that more young women who attended Transylvania went on to earn advanced degrees than graduates of the University of Kentucky.  She recalls a trip to Europe with Mrs. Charles Fishback Norton, Transylvania’s librarian, and Norton’s niece, Betsy Spencer. Haselden describes teaching in Beattyville, Kentucky in 1926, where there were no roads for cars. She also taught in Lancaster between 1927 and 1931, and attended Columbia University during the summer to complete her Master’s degree in French. While she was in New York, she states that she met important artists, and attended major plays and concerts.  Haselden then studied at the Sorbonne between 1931 and 1932.

In 1932, Haselden taught advanced French as well as one semester of math at Centre College. She was Dean of Women and a French instructor at Transylvania University and Murray State University.  Haselden earned her Ph.D. in Psychology at UK, and became Assistant Dean of Women and Assistant Professor of French at UK. She decided to get her Ph.D. before the age of 35, as she felt that “waiting longer would not do her as much good.”  She notes she felt no discouragement from the male professors, because she was a woman, except for one incident when she was warned against going to the old Psychology building late at night to take care of the rats for an experiment.

 

89OH278 A/F 386

JANE HASELDEN

Date:  October 27, 1989

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length: 45 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript: First Draft

Restrictions: None

In this second interview, Jane Haselden mentions that she was considered for the same job at Cornell University that Dean Sarah Blanding eventually accepted. She was also offered the presidency of Finch College, but turned it down. Haselden had been Dean of Women at both Transylvania and Murray State Universities, where she also taught French.  After receiving her PhD. from the University of Kentucky, Haselden became Assistant Dean of Women and taught introductory French at UK. She mentions that she had a pilot’s license and explains that she became interested in flying when she was a child.  She bought a plane with Murelle Johnson while at UK, and recalls flying during lunch with Anita Gardner, a secretary in the Dean’s office. She also received a Water Safety Examiner’s certificate.

Haselden was in charge of the sororities on UK’s campus, and she remembers that she was at the Lexington Country Club supervising the installment of a new sorority, when she heard that Pearl Harbor had been bombed. Haselden talks about the difficulties with student housing during World War II.  She recalls that there were not enough students to run the fraternity houses, and as military personnel arrived on campus for training, temporary housing was built.  Haselden states, though, that World War II did not stop her from flying her plane over a UK-Alabama football game.  Haselden explains how she and Dean Sarah B. Holmes divided responsibilities supervising the female students, and how they encouraged the women to participate in the war effort.  Haselden recalls that women received temporary teaching appointments and other employment opportunities on campus during the war.  She states that wives could not teach at UK if their husbands already did, so many of them taught at Transylvania University.  Yet, Haselden did not see herself as a role model for the women students.

Haselden remembers past UK presidents and their wives including President Frank L McVey and Frances Jewell McVey, and President Herman L. and Nell Donovan. She particularly describes unequal pay for women during Donovan’s tenure. She also mentions Dean Leo Chamberlain’s “intellectual integrity.”  Haselden was President of the Kentucky Association of Deans of Women. She also talks about Dean Sarah Blanding, and the women’s rights movement.

 

94OH59 A/F 532

JOHN WESLEY HATCH

Date:  May 1, 1994

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Lauretta Byers and Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

John Wesley Hatch was born in Louisville, Kentucky. His mother, Grace Seales Hatch, was born in the community of Cadentown, near Lexington, Kentucky in 1904. His father was born in Louisville although his family’s roots are in Belltown, Kentucky. His parents met at Lincoln Institute in Shelbyville, Kentucky. Hatch recalls his grandfather, who talked about relatives who were slaves.  Three of Hatch’s grandparents had lived in slavery.  Hatch’s father was an African Methodist preacher, so the family moved frequently.  He recalls that they once lived in Corydon in Henderson County, Kentucky, which is the hometown of A. B. “Happy” Chandler. Hatch talks about Lyman Johnson, who was his history teacher when they moved back to Louisville. Hatch graduated from Rosenwall High School, in Lebanon, in 1946. He recalls his first lessons in segregation as a boy.

Hatch attended Kentucky State University, where he enjoyed the “cosmopolitan environment.” He enrolled in the law school at Kentucky State in 1948, which was offered through the University of Kentucky law school.  He was the only law student.  He recalls that classes were later moved to the State Capitol in Frankfort, Kentucky, where he met Thurgood Marshall, Robert Carter, James Nabritt, Jr., and others.  These men recommended that he find a different way to learn law, including attending Howard University.  Hatch transferred to UK’s Lexington campus in the fall of 1949, but only stayed for one semester. He talks about segregation practices at UK stating that he could not attend moot court, which he considered the “most grievous” part of the entire experience. Once again, other black lawyers encouraged him to transfer to Howard.

When Hatch’s family moved to rural Arkansas, he joined them, and taught school until he was drafted into the Korean War.  He states that it was in the Army that he finally experienced an “unsegregated” environment. He discusses the challenges and obstacles black students still face in order to obtain a quality education and develop their talents. Hatch recalls he thought desegregation might be enough, but now realizes that it is a very complex problem. He notes that our “society is slipping, and unless it becomes more imaginative and creative, it will become a second-rate power.”

 

Annotated Guide to the Charles T. Wethington U.K. Alumni/Faculty Oral History Project: Helm - Irvin.

If not available online, audio copies and/or transcripts of the interviews in this project are available in the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

 

01OH69 A/F 622

BARBARA HELM

Date:  September 26, 2001

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Marian Roman

Length:

Audio Conditions:

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Barbara Helm is a former Ph.D. student in Gerontology at UK and currently works with the Breckenridge, an Alzheimer’s care facility associated with the University of Kentucky.  Helm states that she decided to apply to the Gerontology Ph.D.  program in 1990, while she was working as the Education Coordinator for the Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center of the UK’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. She also has a Master’s degree in Gerontology.  She states that her enthusiasm for the program waned when the planning process and politics delayed its approval, but that members of the department encouraged her to persevere.  Helm entered the first class of the program with seven other students.  She explains that she completed two courses while working full-time and doing consulting work.  Helm states that she realized she could not reconcile the academic focus with her real-world experience, and decided to take a job offered by the Breckenridge and leave the Ph.D. program.  When Helm was briefed during her exit interview from the Ph. D. program, she emphasized that the spiritual component was left out of her studies, which she considered a large gap in the study of the aging process.  Helm also discusses problems with the program since they want experienced students, but only teach the basics.

 

85OH136 A/F 247

H. D. HILLIARD

Date:  June 14, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 40 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript: No

Restrictions: None

H. David Hilliard was born in Clinton, Kentucky in 1916. He attended the high school at what later became Hickman County High School. On the family farm, his parents raised hogs and chickens.  Hilliard recalls that brother once completed a 2-acre cotton project for the 4-H Club. During the Depression in 1934, Hilliard managed to get a job with the National Youth Administration (NYA) in Murray, Kentucky custom hay baling on a farm for two summers. Later, Hilliard could not get the job back, so he hitchhiked to Lexington, Kentucky and enrolled at the University of Kentucky, where he graduated in 1938. He taught vocational agriculture for five years in London, Kentucky, while completing graduate work in agricultural education during the summer.

Hilliard stresses the importance of the instruction and assistance he received from UK’s College of Agriculture, the Agricultural Experiment Station, and Extension Services throughout his career. He has worked on the 1300 acre family farm in Hickman County since 1943.  Hilliard describes the livestock and crop programs on the farm, and discusses his participation in the certified seed program, where he grew Kentucky 31 fescue and hybrid seed corn with registered seed. He mentions many people he worked with in these programs, such as Shirley Phillips, Dr. Oran Little, and Dr. W. D. Valleau. Hilliard discusses his work as President of the Kentucky Seed Improvement Association in 1967 and between 1971 and 1975. He explains his work with the Farm Analysis Group, and states that he was President of the Production Credit Administration. He also served on the Extension Advisory Committee. Hilliard discusses his satisfying and dissatisfying experiences, and talks about his family. The interviewer lists the many organizations Hilliard has served as well as his many awards, including the Thomas Poe Cooper award.

 

90OH309 A/F 409

BARBARA HITCHCOCK

Date:  August 10, 1972

Location:  Skaneateles, New York

Interviewer:  Charles Talbert

Length: 2 hours

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Mrs. Barbara McVey Hitchcock is a niece of Dr. Frank L. McVey. Other family members are present and sometimes contribute during this interview. Hitchcock reminisces about her early life, her parents and grandparents, family lore, and summer vacations with family. She recalls several visits with “Aunt Frances and Uncle Frank” McVey at Maxwell Place. Hitchcock states that she was initially terrified of “Aunt Frances” and anxious about staying with her aunt and uncle when she attended the University of Kentucky. She describes Maxwell Place in detail, and recalls many formal and informal activities held there.  She mentions several students who stayed in the apartment above the garage including A. B. “Happy” Chandler, John Jacob Niles, and Jesse Stuart. Hitchcock also discusses a visit by Mrs. Eleanor (Franklin D.) Roosevelt, Mrs. Nikita Khrushchev, and Mrs. Henry Morgenthau to UK during Farmer’s Week, and their attendance at the tea held for the farmer’s wives. She recalls Mrs. Morgenthau and Frances Jewell McVey were classmates at Vassar College.

Hitchcock states that she traveled with McVey in support of UK’s Extension Services. They visited the agricultural sub-stations, including one at Buckhorn, near Hazard, Kentucky, where shootings occurred in 1937 at the mines. She recalls a Christmas spent with the Jewell family and her first taste of green beans cooked “Southern style.” Hitchcock mentions the weekly afternoon teas held at Maxwell Place each Wednesday and the Senior Breakfasts held on the lawn. She remembers lively discussions between Sarah Gibson Blanding and Frank L. McVey. She mentions the Book Thieves Club, a literary group consisting of Charles Staples, William H. Townsend, John Winston Coleman, McVey, and others. Hitchcock and other family members relate stories which illustrate McVey’s sense of humor. She talks about the Guignol Theater. She mentions visits by Vice-President Alben W. Barkley. Charles Talbert records information regarding McVey’s original name, which was Harry. Hitchcock mentions the death of her grandfather due to gangrene, and France Jewell McVey’s funeral.  

 

78OH09 A/F 82

SARAH B. HOLMES

Date:  February 20, 1978

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  William Cooper

Length: 1 hour, 25 minutes

Audio Conditions:

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Sarah B. Holmes was born in eastern Pennsylvania near the Pocono Mountains.  She was valedictorian of her class at East Augsburg State Teacher’s College.  Holmes later taught in Glen Ridge, New Jersey while she continued her studies at the Teacher’s College, Columbia University, where she met her husband.  Her husband obtained his M.D. from Bowdoin College.  She recalls they married in 1910 and traveled to Mexico City to start a health program, just as the Mexican Revolution began.  Holmes recalls some of their experiences during this time. They later worked at Ohio Wesleyan, during which time Dr. Frank L. McVey asked her husband to help establish a new health center at the University of Kentucky.

Holmes’s husband died in 1924. By this time, they had four children, so she accepted the position of Dean at Sayre School in Lexington. She also became involved with the University of Kentucky by taking classes, supervising the residence halls, teaching, and serving as a chaperone for social affairs.  She recalls that by 1932, the Depression began to affect the university.  Funding was cut, salaries were reduced or frozen, but the enrollment still continued to increase. Holmes explains that she helped to organize a cooperative living program for students. She became Assistant Dean of Women at UK upon the recommendation of Dean Sarah Blanding, and then became Dean of Women in 1941, when Blanding went to work at Cornell University.  Holmes remembers UK presidents Dr. Frank McVey, and Dr. Herman L. Donovan, who she claims was “one of the best administrators” she has ever known.

Holmes mentions several Kentucky governors and their involvement with university affairs and she talks about the increased emphasis on athletics. Holmes describes a lack of student interest in the events of World War II.  She discusses the changes in the students after the war, and the integration of UK’s campus in 1949. She recalls some of the most serious problems she encountered as Dean of Women, including an incident where Ruby Graham, a female student was barred from graduation after climbing a trapeze.  Holmes explains this decision has “haunted” her.  She recalls satisfying and dissatisfying experiences associated with her position and several faculty members whom she admired. Holmes also remembers the disparity of salaries between men and women. She mentions a lack of etiquette education for current students.

 

79OH123 A/F 101

DAVID HOLWERK

Date:  December 4, 1978

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  John Jason Peter

Length: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

David Holwerk begins this interview by talking about his fifth year at the University of Kentucky in 1969. He was taking classes part-time and attempting avoid the draft, which was a fairly common practice during this period. He recalls he was a member of the National Student Association (NSA).  Holwerk also worked with the Bluetail Fly, an underground “left-wing” off-campus newspaper, which was an offshoot of disgruntled students from the Kentucky Kernel. He recalls how the Bluetail Fly got its name. Holwerk wrote a group of editorials for the Kernel under the title “Cynic View.” He recalls campus life in general changed dramatically during the period he was at UK.

Holwerk recalls the first anti-war demonstration at UK in the fall of 1969, but states that agitation really began right before the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago. Holwerk remembers that Robert Frampton organized the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) on UK’s campus during this time. Holwerk explains that he was involved the Appalachian Volunteers, a program aimed at ending poverty.  He mentions increased drug use on UK’s campus during the late 1960s, and especially notes rising marijuana use.

Holwerk talks extensively about his participation in events on May 5, 1970 at UK, the day after the Kent State killings.  He recalls a student rallies held on the patio at the Student Center and other locations on UK’s campus. He mentions several students who were active in these events, including Don Pratt, True Gardner, and Frank Shannon, an SDS activist. Holwerk states that he did not participate in the student march across campus, but recalls that he was stunned when the ROTC building (Buell Armory) was burned, since the Kentucky State Police were present. Holwerk talks about the curfew put in place and Governor Louie B. Nunn’s decision to send in the National Guard. He recalls “getting gassed” with tear gas on May 6 at the Student Center. Holwerk was charged under UK’s Code of Conduct and talks about the hearing, where he was accused of using strong language during the rally.  Holwerk was acquitted, but he remembers changes in the Student Code and the Student Judicial Board after these events. Holwerk also talks about Jack Hall, Dean of Students.

 

84OH96 A/F 153

LEVI JACKSON HORLACHER

Date:  September 21, 1984

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Audio Conditions:

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Levi Jackson Horlacher was born in 1896 in Washington Township, Clinton County, Indiana.  Horlacher attended rural schools in Indiana and Kansas, and first became involved with agricultural extension in 1909 while attending high school in Frankfort, Indiana. He was later awarded a scholarship to Purdue University and was a member of the 1916 Purdue University Livestock Judging Team which won the National Collegiate Livestock Judging Contest at the International Livestock Exposition in Chicago, Illinois. Horlacher studied Animal Husbandry and received his B. S. degree from Purdue and his M. S. degree from Kansas State Agricultural College.

Horlacher recalls E. S. Good offered him a position at the University of Kentucky in 1918, and mentions the various positions he held during his tenure. He reads an extensively detailed early history of UK’s College of Agriculture, which includes information on early faculty members, research projects, and the livestock judging teams.  This history also mentions purchases of purebred foundation livestock, UK’s difficulties in acquiring land, and changes to the curriculum.

Horlacher remembers that UK developed a wool-selling cooperative during World War I, and states that he was the only college professor in the country licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) to grade wool. Horlacher supervised the livestock judging teams from 1919 until 1934, and also employed Harold Barber, a well-known sheepherder, who exhibited prize-winning sheep locally and nationally. Kentucky became known internationally for its sheep program.

Dean Thomas Poe Cooper asked Horlacher to become Assistant Dean so that he could work with students academically.  After additional course work, Horlacher assumed this role in 1927. He recalls the effects of the Depression on faculty and students. He remembers the increased interest by women in pursuing an agricultural education, which began before World War I. He mentions his involvement with many professional organizations, and talks at length about the history of beef cattle in Kentucky. Horlacher was a Technical Training Leader in Iran, India, and Guatemala from 1953-1956. Horlacher retired from UK in 1964. He remembers his wife, Vaneta Thomas, who died in 1982, and he talks at length about his family.

 

90OH315 A/F 415

LEVI JACKSON HORLACHER

Date:  January 8, 1974

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles Talbert

Length: 50 minutes

Audio Conditions: Fair

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Professor Levi Jackson Horlacher is Dean Emeritus of the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture. He came to the Department of Animal Husbandry at UK in June of 1918.  Horlacher remembers PresidentFrank McVey and Dean Thomas Poe Cooper “set a good example” for young faculty members.  He states that McVey and Cooper earned the acceptance as well as respect of the people of Kentucky, even though they were Northerners.  Horlacher remembers McVey’s last commencement address, given at Stoll Field during a rainstorm.

Horlacher describes the teas hosted by the McVey’s at Maxwell Place, especially one for Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt when she came to speak at the Farm and Home Convention. He talks at length about President McVey, and notes that many people thought he was aloof, although Horlacher feels that he may just have been shy. Horlacher recalls the purchase of the land for the Experiment Station, and explains that McVey decided to acquire it due to concern that it would be subdivided.  Horlacher mentions the conflict between the College of Agriculture and the Experiment Station while Fred Mutchler was Director and Henry Stites Barker was President. He recalls the reorganization of the College of Agriculture when Thomas Poe Cooper became the new Dean as well as Director of both Extension and the Experiment Station. Horlacher notes that the College of Extension had been a separate entity at the time, a common practice in many states. He feels this centralization of administration was necessary to better coordinate the activities of the department.

Horlacher remembers the efforts of McVey and Ezra Gillis to find a location for Memorial Hall, which was built to honor those who died in World War I.  He talks about his duties in the Department of Animal Husbandry. Horlacher remembers the controversy regarding evolution, and praises McVey for how he handled the situation.  He mentions several individuals involved with this, including J. W. Porter, Clarence Walker, and Noel Gaines. Horlacher recalls a similar situation occurred at the University of Tennessee, and Harcourt Morgan took the position that it was a religious matter, and that UT should not be involved. Horlacher discusses the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (NASULGC), a merger of the American Association of Land Grant Colleges and State Universities with the National Association of State Universities.

 

75OH29 A/F 06

JAMES F. HOPKINS

Date:  November 3, 1975

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles C. Hay

Length: 1 hour, 40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Excellent

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

James F. Hopkins is a retired Professor of History at the University of Kentucky. He came to UK as a graduate student in 1937, and received his M. A. in History in 1938. Hopkins recalls he and Clark were from the same county in Mississippi, but met as roommates their first year at the University of Mississippi. Dr. Thomas D. Clark encouraged him to pursue graduate work at UK, and like Clark, Hopkins received his Ph.D. from Duke University, where he studied under Charles Sackett Sydnor. Hopkins discusses the department and the faculty in place at UK when he returned in 1940 to teach.   Hopkins married and was drafted shortly thereafter. He talks about the effect World War II had on campus activities.  By the time Hopkins returned after the war, Clark was the department head.  Hopkins remembers he met Lyman Johnson, the first African American to attend graduate school at UK under court order in 1948. He recalls John Hope Franklin was a consultant on this case. He remembers the History faculty was sympathetic towards the situation, although some students and faculty still favored segregation.

Hopkins remembers McCarthyism during the 1950’s and that, in general, UK’s faculty perceived Senator Joseph McCarthy as “a menace.” He talks about membership in the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Hopkins shares his recollections of UK presidents he worked under including  Frank McVey, Herman L. Donovan, Frank G. Dickey, and John W. Oswald. He discusses the criteria for tenure. He talks about the process of studying history and judging the objectivity and originality of the research material.  Hopkins discusses his writings and the challenges of research.  He talks funding the project to arrange and describe the Henry Clay papers through several channels, including the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). Hopkins explains the importance of small presses such as the University Press for providing scholarly publishing opportunities. He recalls traveling to professional meetings. He talks about his work with the UK Senate and various committees. Hopkins also discusses changes in student attitudes towards education over the years.

 

85OH149 A/F 258

WENDELL HOWARD

Date:  June 25, 1985

Location:  Lexington, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 40 minutes

Audio Conditions: Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Wendell E. Howard was born in the Harrods Grove community of Marshall County, near Calvert City in Kentucky in 1910. His family owned a 136 acre farm. He graduated from eighth grade at the Harrods Grove community one-room elementary school in 1925, and attended Calvert City High School. Howard received his B. S. degree in Agriculture from the University of Kentucky in 1933 and his Master’s degree in 1941. He recalls H. R. Cottrell, who was the County Agent in Marshall County, helped him with his first 4-H swine project and encouraged him to join the livestock judging team in grade school. He also mentions H. E. Hendricks, who replaced Cottrell and Joe Kilpatrick, as the District Agent for Western Kentucky.

Howard taught vocational agriculture for ten years and served as principal of Ewing High School in Fleming County, Kentucky.  He recalls the formation of the Fleming County Farm Bureau.  Howard explains that the Kentucky Farm Bureau was formed in 1919, and Kentucky was one of the first states in the American Farm Bureau Federation. He mentions Ben Kilgore, an early founder.

Howard was Executive Vice-President of the Kentucky Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company and is known as “Mr. Farm Bureau Insurance.” He discusses at length the history, formation, and scope of the Farm Bureau Mutual Insurance Company. Howard describes the company’s early association with State Farm Casualty and Indiana Farm Bureau, which joined to provide casualty and property damage insurance to farmers.  Howard discusses current coverage available to farmers, and talks about the history of several insurance organizations, including the American Insurance Association, the American Mutual Association, and the National Association of Independent Insurers, and the Southern Farm Bureau Life Insurance Company. Howard also recalls lobbying with E. S. Kessler at the state and national level on behalf of farmers.

Howard talks about his involvement in various organizations, especially the Kentucky Council of Cooperatives. He credits UK and Extension Services with the assistance provided to farmers over the years, and mentions several staff members. He talks about his family, and mentions his awards.  Howard is known as “Mr. Farm Bureau Insurance.”

 

75OH26 A/F 04

SARAH HULETTE

Date:  September 18, 1975

Location:  Morganfield, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Terry Birdwhistell

Length: 50 minutes

Audio Conditions:

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Sarah Hulette is from Lexington, Kentucky and entered the University of Kentucky in 1962, where she majored in History, minored in Political Science.  Hulette was awarded the Sullivan Medallion upon graduation in 1966.  She talks about her membership in Chi Omega sorority, and how this experience was beneficial in developing self-confidence. She was also a member of Panhellenic Board and the Student Center Board, which was responsible for campus activities. The Board decided to remain separate from Student Government to function more effectively. Hulette discusses changes on campus for female students such as curfew and dormitory regulations. She talks about UK Presidents Frank Dickey and John T. Oswald. She recalls how national issues affected social attitudes as well as the political atmosphere on campus during the 1960s.

Hulette worked at the Kentucky Kernel, the student newspaper, and states that it expanded from reporting campus activities to more controversial issues “to cause a stir.” Hulette remembers several UK professors were unhappy living in Lexington, and expresses negative views towards the local community and the South.  She discusses the Greek organizations’ position regarding black students signing up for Rush Week. Hulette mentions a local story, that Mrs. Adolph Rupp told Coach Rupp that “there would be no colored basketball players” at UK. Hulette was Chairman of the Homecoming Steering Committee in 1964, a year when UK won the football game. She recalls UK made national news in 1962 when two homecoming queens were crowned by mistake; one was the girlfriend of Cotton Nash, an All-American basketball player for UK. Hulette discusses significant changes at UK since she graduated, including the new architecture. She was Assistant Program Director at the Student Center in 1968.

 

75OH21 A/F 02

SIDNEY H. HULETTE

Date:  September 17, 1975

Location:  Morganfield, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Charles Atcher

Length: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Audio Conditions: Excellent

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Sidney H. Hulette talks about his experiences at the University of Kentucky. He discusses his membership in Sigma Nu fraternity and the support he received from his fellow members. He recalls that students had to maintain a certain grade average to remain eligible. He remembers that programs brought on campus, including a concert by the pianist Van Cliburn, were attended primarily by fraternity and sorority students.  President Frank G. Dickey’s son was a fraternity brother of Hulette’s. He talks briefly about his perception of the differences between President Dickey and President John W. Oswald. He reminisces about off-campus hangouts such as Danceland and Joyland, and mentions Tommy Gentry, whose father managed Darby Dan Farm, where they would sometimes party.

Hulette recalls the football team experienced “lean years” while he was at UK. He remembers several UK basketball players such as Cotton Nash and Larry Conley; Conley was in his law school class. Hulette states that he was not involved in campus politics, but he talks about the national concern in the late sixties regarding the Vietnam War. He remembers that protest activities came late to UK’s campus, and things were “generally pretty quiet” while he was in law school.  Hulette left UK in December of 1968. Hulette discusses the changes lifestyle and dress on campus during the late 1960s, and discusses the importance of the college experience for meeting others and learning about different perspectives.

 

84OH95 A/F 152

HUGH HURST

Date:  September 17, 1984

Location:  Somerset, Kentucky

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length: 1 hour, 10 minutes

Audio Conditions:

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

Hugh Thomas Hurst was born in Talladega County, Alabama in 1912. He attended Berea College between 1935 and 1939, and earned his B. S. degree in Agriculture. He also completed several agricultural courses at the University of Kentucky and Colorado State University.  Hurst recalls he was active in 4-H Clubs while growing up, and explains that his father was an Extension Leader. Hurst served as an extension agent in Whitley, Johnson, McCreary, and Letcher Counties in Kentucky before coming to Pulaski County, where he worked for 38 years. He recalls Pulaski County was considered a “burying ground” for County Agents, due poor funding, bad office conditions, and a resistant attitude from people towards the Extension Service. Hurst talks about UK’s policy regarding supplying help to the counties through Extension Services, and his work with Pulaski County leadership to obtain the improvements in personnel and facilities. He recalls his first Assistant County Agent, J. W. Kidwell.

Hurst remembers the local newspaper was not initially friendly towards Extension Services, but stresses the importance of the news media for spreading information about extension.  He lists this as one of the many broad changes which have directly or indirectly affected Extension Services. He talks at length about the slow but successful efforts made to improve farming practices and conditions in Pulaski County, including raising corn with the no-till methods and up-to-date machinery. He discusses chickens and notes that Pulaski County is considered the top poultry producing county in the state. Hurst talks about the Green Pasture Program, livestock and alfalfa production, and the building of silos.  He discusses improvements in dairy production. He remembers the formation of the Kentucky Artificial Breeding Association and the difficulties with the Strawberry Growers Association.

Hurst recalls the importance of the news media for reaching people and emphasizes that Extension has become more than just farming; it is now a balance of farming, industry, and tourism.  He mentions many people in Extension who helped him in his work. Hurst retired in 1977, and recalls his retirement celebrations. The interviewer reads a letter from Senator John Sherman Cooper, who was from Pulaski County. Hurst mentions his work with many professional organizations and pays tribute to J. M. Feltner.

 

85OH08 A/F 177

WILLIAM INSKO, JR.

Date:  December 7, 1978

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Mike Duff

Length:  20 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good 

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

William Insko, Jr., a former UK professor, was a leading authority on poultry incubation, and president of the Poultry Science Association.  Insko was born in 1901 in Carlisle, Kentucky, and started working at UK in 1928 where he was an Assistant in Poultry Husbandry.  Insko later served as Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry, Professor in Charge of Poultry Husbandry, Chairman of the Poultry Department, and Chairman of the Animal Science Department.  He describes the radical changes that were occurring in the poultry industry when he started working at UK including improvement in nutrition, the growth of chicks, the use of vitamins, and the development battery brooders for breeding.  Insko talks about the Smith Incubator Company in Lexington, Kentucky who supplied UK with incubators.  He describes the National Poultry Improvement Plan which was instrumental in improving egg production and in combating disease. 

Insko discusses research efforts at UK and the involvement of UK in improvement in the poultry industry.  He describes how UK professors and extension agents held meetings and visited with individuals to discuss marketing, housing, feeding, and general care. He describes outstanding men in Kentucky’s poultry industry including D.D. Slade of UK extension who started the Kentucky Hatchery in Lexington and served as president of the National Hatchery Association for many years. Insko discusses UK’s research on efficiency in hatchery operations and those involved including Dr. George Byers and Dr. [McLaury]. 

Insko explains that he was asked to serve on a committee of Avian Standards of the Institute of Laboratory Resources, and talks about his work on this committee.  He describes the poultry industry of the future as he envisions it.  Insko sees a more commercialized industry with larger farms and larger hatchery operations.  Insko also talks about his wife and family.

 

92OH144 A/F 493

ROBERT IRELAND

Date:  March 13, 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Bryan Beauman

Length:  45 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Fair 

Transcript:  Yes

Restrictions:  None

Robert Ireland, Acting Chair and Professor, in the University of Kentucky, Department of History discusses the development of his career.  He was born in Lincoln, Nebraska in 1937 and earned his Bachelor’s degree in 1959 from the University of Nebraska.  He explains that he attended law school at Stanford University and earned his J.D. in 1962.  Ireland states that he disliked the law profession, so after a year with a law firm in Oregon, he decided to pursue his Ph.D. in history at the University of Nebraska.  He describes awards he received as a student, and mentions honors he has earned as a professor including the Collins Article Awards from the Kentucky Historical Society, the Hallam Article Award and the Hallam Book Award, and teaching awards.  Ireland discusses his family’s interest in education, and explains that his father was an academic dentist and dean of the College of Dentistry at the University of Nebraska. 

Ireland came to UK in the Fall of 1967.  He recalls that UK expressed an interest in him immediately and that he liked the university because it was in a good position both academically and geographically.  He describes a typical day including his activities as department chairperson, teaching duties, advisory activities, administrative work, and research.  Ireland talks about the specific abilities and skills required of a person in his position mentioning the need for good people skills, organizational abilities, and efficiency.  He explains that teaching bright, eager students is his favorite part of his job, but states that he dislikes night or weekend meetings.  Ireland talks about tenure, and the independent nature of his work.  He discusses greatest achievement of UK as a university as its role as the flagship university, and the biggest problem as the political involvement into the university’s affairs.  He talks about the effect of gender and age upon careers at UK.  Ireland also mentions his wife, children, and grandchild.

 

92OH148 A/F 495

ROBERT IRELAND

Date:  April 13, 1992

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Bryan Beaumann 

Length:  45 minutes

Audio Conditions:  Fair 

Transcript: No

Restrictions:  None

In this second interview with Robert Ireland, Chair of UK’s History Department, he describes his work in both teaching and research.  He talks about the rewards of his career choice including flexibility with time and the ability to be your own boss, but mentions some frustrations with advising.  Ireland describes the role of communication within the department of history and states that it is a myth that if you are chair you know everything.  Ireland also discusses the organizational structure of the history department mentioning committees and merit evaluations, and his role in dealing with inter-departmental conflict. 

Ireland describes his personal life and habits.  He states that he and his wife both work full-time, and that they attempt to keep their work at work.  Ireland talks about receiving a teaching award and role of research and publishing in academia.   He states that he did not truly understand the “publish or perish” motto until after he received tenure.  He describes his research projects which focused on Kentucky history for the first fifteen years of his career, but has expanded into national legal history.  He tells a story about trouble that he had doing research at the Maryland Historical Society for his dissertation, and talks about his latest research project on the role of honor in the nineteenth century criminal justice system in the U.S. especially the unwritten laws protecting avengers of sexual dishonor.

Ireland discusses teaching and mentions his classes on American Constitutional History and American Legal History.  He explains his teaching philosophy and his idea that students should be taught to think for themselves, and provides his opinion of student evaluations.  He discusses comments that Governor Brereton Jones made in regards to research and teaching at UK.  Ireland mentions how his time is divided between teaching, research, and administrative work.  He also explains how he would like to see further changes in higher education in Kentucky for more flexible arrangements for teaching.   

 

75OH43 A/F 13

JOHN G. IRVIN

Date:  December 15, 1975

Location: Lexington, Kentucky 

Interviewer:  Terry L. Birdwhistell

Length:  1 hour, 15 minutes 

Audio Conditions:  Good

Transcript:  No

Restrictions: None

John G. Irvin was a student at the University of Kentucky right before and after World War II.  He was born in Carlisle, Kentucky, but explains that he grew up all over central and eastern Kentucky because his father traveled testing cattle for tuberculosis.  Irvin came to Lexington in September of 1941 and attended Transylvania for one year before transferring to UK.  Irvin states that he joined a reserve program for enlisted men which enabled him to avoid military service until March of 1943.  He came back to UK in the Spring of 1946 to finish his degree.  He majored in journalism and recalls professors including Dr. Neil Plumber, Victor Portland, and Mr. Macaulay.  Irvin talks about the fun that he had in the journalism department and explains that he even married a former editor of the Kentucky Kernal, the student newspaper. 

Irvin describes social activities on campus mentioning that he was a member of the Kappa Alpha fraternity.  He recalls that Professor Frank Dickey would often chaperone the Kappa Alpha events.  Irvin states that he noticed few differences on campus before and after the war, including the benefits of the G.I. Bill, and the fact that the veterans were somewhat more serious students.  He describes taverns and restaurants near campus which were frequented by students.  He talks about the student government and regulations toward women on campus.  He particularly recalls negotiating with the Dean of Women, Sarah Holmes, to allow the women to stay out later when there were bands like Jimmy Dorsey and Skitch Henderson visiting campus.  He also describes his involvement when Ruby Graham attempted to climb an aerial trapeze on Memorial Day in 1949.  Graham barred from the graduation celebration, due to this stunt.

Irvin recalls the ground-breaking for Memorial Coliseum, and talks about the role of athletics at the university.  He states that he enjoyed the courses that he took in history and political science mentioning “tremendous” professors like Thomas D. Clark and Jasper Shannon.  He remembers participation of student in politics, describes a controversial speech professor, and talks about his belief in academic freedom.  He explains the effect that UK had upon his life, and states that his education was not nearly as useful as the people he met while attending UK.  Irvin also tells stories about working at the Phoenix Hotel.  He discusses significant changes to the campus since he graduated including building of the A.B. Chandler Medical Center.  He also mentions his involvement with UK’s Alumni Association.

Browse The Oral History Collection By Subject Or Keyword.

Description

Loading  Loading...

Tip