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English Literature and Language   Tags: english, language, linguistics, literature, research  

Research guide for literature in the English language, the study of the English language, and guides for courses in the English Department at the University of Kentucky.
Last Updated: Jul 30, 2014 URL: http://libguides.uky.edu/english Print Guide RSS UpdatesEmail Alerts

Getting Started Print Page
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Welcome!

Welcome to the guide for literature in the English language
and the study of the English language.
 

This guide will connect you with resources to find books, journal articles, information from reference books, as well as primary texts and other sources.

ENG 104 and other courses in the English Department have specific course guides to further help you with research in those courses.

Have an assignment and don't know where to start? The Guide to the Research Process will walk you through the basics, step by step.  Still have questions?  Just ask a librarian, as we're glad to help.

 

Announcements

 

Free access to all Palgrave Macmillan journal content in April 2013

From April 1-30, 2013 Palgrave Macmillan will be offering free online access to its full journals portfolio.

All current and archival content spanning the Humanities, the Social Sciences and Business will be available, including access to the following high-profile journals, Journal of International Business Studies, Feminist Review, International Politics and the award-winning postmedieval: a journal of medieval cultural studiesFor more information, visit Access All Areas.

 

Getting Started with your Research

Some quick tips to get you started:

  • Understand your assignment.  What kind of information do you need?  Peer-reviewed journal articles, literary criticism, biographical information?
  • Know your deadlines.  It is so much easier to do your research early so that you will have plenty of time to write your paper.
  • Develop your topic.  Narrowing your broad idea to a specific question you want to research will save you much time and effort.
  • Brainstorm keywords.  Think about keywords related to each aspect of your topic to help in searching.

The Guide to the Research Process will take you through library research step by step, from developing your topic, finding and evaluating a variety of information sources, and citing your sources properly.  It is an excellent place to start your research, and following the guide will save you time.  In addition to the Guide to the Research Process, check to see if there is a course guide available for your class.

If you run into any trouble at any point in your research process, you can always Ask a Librarian for help.

Another advantage to starting your research early: you can schedule a consultation with a librarian.  Librarians are here to help you navigate the many resources available to you, and a consultation is a great opportunity to make sure you are looking in the right places.  Librarians are glad to help!

Head of Young Library Reference Services & Librarian for English and Linguistics

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Jennifer A. Bartlett
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2-31 William T. Young Library
859-218-1236
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